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Category Archives: vCloud Suite

SDDC Reference Architecture

I’m pleased to announce the first in a series of reference architectures is now available.

This reference architecture showcases the integrations between VMware vCloud® Suite Enterprise, VMware NSX for vSphere®, and VMware vCenter Log Insight to create an on-demand infrastructure with a secure networking environment. It is based on real-world scenarios, user workloads, and infrastructure system configurations. It uses industry-standard servers, IP-based storage, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet (10GbE) networking to support a scalable and redundant architecture based on vCloud Suite Enterprise version 5.5.

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Don’t miss what your peers are saying about building a Software-Defined Data Center at VMworld 2014!

Ever wonder how you can:

  • Forecast storage needs for the next 1-3 years
  • Deploy a cost-effective storage tier for VDI environments
  • Monitor compute and reduce mean time to resolution
  • Virtualize and provide Disaster Recovery for Business Critical Applications, like SAP / Oracle RAC Database and ERP
  • Automate server and application provisioning, with a true service catalog

Join us in a roundtable discussion on architecting a Software-Defined Data Center, design trade-off decisions, and time to value. John Gilmartin, General Manager of the SDDC Suites Business Unit, will moderate the discussion among:

  • Ricky Caldwell, MCSE, CCIA, CCE-V – Director, Server Infrastructure & Architecture for Cornerstone Home Lending
  • Andy Lubel – Manager, Technical Infrastructure for Exostar
  • Suzan Pickett – Senior Manager, Global Infrastructure Services for Columbia Sportswear
  • Sunyo Suhaimi – IT Cloud Transformation Director for VMware

Register now for SDDC2556-S – Customer Panel: Journey to Software-Defined Data Center. Attend and you just might be 1 of 5 lucky session attendees who will take home an iPad Mini or a Patagonia jacket. Because it never hurts to be prepared –  “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.” See you there.

Profiling OLTP performance on Virtualized SQL 2014 with All Flash Arrays


TPC-C Benchmark is an on-line transaction processing (OLTP). (TPCC Main site) TPC-C uses a mix of five concurrent transactions of different types and complexity. The database is comprised of nine types of tables with a wide range of record and population sizes. TPC-C is measured as transactions per minute (TPM).

The goal of this exercise was to see if 1 million TPM can be achieved on virtualized SQL 2014 backed by an all Flash storage array for a TPC-C like test.  The TPC-C testing would be compared between two VM sizes (Within NUMA & Exceeding NUMA boundaries)

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Journey to the SDDC – vSphere with Operations Management

Are you looking at the Software-Defined Datacenter (SDDC) and taking a dive into the vCloud Suite? As you take your journey it sometimes becomes confusing and potentially overwhelming as you look at all the possibilities and figure out what comes next.

For example, it’s fairly easy to recognize the value in these solutions, but you also do understand that implementing change takes time and resources no matter how much you desire to get them done. Continue reading

vCenter Server 5.5 Update 1b released

Today VMware released an update to its virtualization management solution, vCenter Server. The update brings several fixes as documented in the release notes which can be reviewed in full here.

The new versions are as follows:

  • vCenter Server 5.5 Update 1b | 12 JUN 2014 | Build 1891313
  • vCenter Server 5.5 Update 1b Installation Package | 12 JUN 2014 | Build 1891310
  • vCenter Server Appliance 5.5 Update 1b | 12 JUN 2014 | Build 1891314
    downloaded now from vmware.com

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Which vCenter Server platform should I use – Appliance or Windows?

One of the most repetitive questions that I get asked is which version of vCenter Server should I be using. This obviously is based on the decision between using the vCenter Server appliance (VCSA) introduced with vSphere 5.0 or the trusted and proven vCenter Server on Windows.

whichplatform

It has been general knowledge that the vCenter Server appliance, since its introduction has lacked features to that of its Windows counterpart. With vSphere 5.5 the vCenter Server appliance has come a long way, it supports all solutions that integrate with vCenter Server (vCD, vCOPs, SRM, VUM etc) but is it production ready? I can confidently say yes but will it meet your requirements?
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vCenter Availability and Performance survey

As many of you know, I work very closely with VMware Product Management and Engineering and we are always looking for data points to support concepts and aid the development of future generations with our products. We have created a 3 page survey that covers Performance and Availability within vCenter Server environments.

Help us make our products better by spending a few minutes to complete, your participation is much appreciated.

https://www.tinyurl.com/VCPerf

 

vSphere Distributed Switch Concept Video

Over the past few months I’ve been creating assets showcasing the features and how to deploy them for our VMware vSphere Distributed Switch (VDS). This last video takes a much higher level overview to help those not so technical realize the benefits of leveraging the VDS.

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Reporting on Site Recovery Manager Failover via PowerCLI

Here’s another fun one!

So we’ve automated some Site Recovery Manager failovers with PowerCLI.  Say we run a weekly test for a given recovery plan.  But now we want to know how it worked.  Maybe generate a table report, maybe email it out, whatever.

Take a look at the following:

I’m assuming you’ve already done the Connect-VIServer and $SrmConnection to the appropriate systems.  What next?  Well as before the $SrmAPI mapping again gives us an entry point to the actual SRM API itself.

$PlanMoref = $SrmApi.Recovery.Listplans()[1].moref 

This is in essence retrieving the managed object reference ID for the recovery plan returned by “Listplans”.  You will need to know which recovery plan you want to report on, but that is easily determined by running the Listplans method without any reference, i.e. simply running:

$SrmApi.Recovery.Listplans

Once you know that you know which plan you want to run the report on and you know whether to pass a [0] or a [1] or whatever to the $PlanMoref variable you are creating.

Once that is done we want to pull out the managed object reference to the *history* of the recovery plan execution.  So we execute the GetHistory method against the $PlanMoref variable we have created, and assign it to the new variable $HistoryMoref.

$HistoryMoref = $SrmApi.Recovery.GetHistory($PlanMoref)

This then attaches us to the history of the particular recovery plan we want, and gives us a nice variable name to use for the next step:

$HistoryMoRef.GetRecoveryResult(1)

This, now, is the heart of the matter.  It is retrieving the data from the latest run of the recovery plan we attached to earlier.  The “1″ listed here indicates the most recent execution of the recovery plan.  If we indicated “2″ it would not retrieve the second most recent, but the last *two* executions, and so forth.  So to retrieve the details of the last run of our recovery plan, we need to know: a) The plan as listed by ListPlans, b) the Moref of the plan as listed by Listplans()[planid].moref, c) to attach to the history using the plan’s GetHistory($PlanMoref), and that we d) access the output by running GetRecoveryResult against all the prior input.

Make sense?  Fundamentally it can be reduced to the 4 or fewer lines, as per my example at the top.  What you do *with* that output is up to you!  If you check out the sample scripts for generating reports against the SRM API, or really reference any PowerCLI materials you’ll doubtless come up with some great ideas for generating tables, reports, emails, whatever is appropriate.

One last thing though – we’ve generated a test run automatically, and now run a report against the result.  What’s next?  Run a cleanup, as per my previous blog about automating execution.

Automating Failover with SRM and PowerCLI

Today we’ll take a look at running a recovery plan for SRM programatically, from the API via PowerCLI.

In almost all scenarios, falling over in an automated fashion is a poor idea.  There is a lot of risk associated with it and a lot of potential liability for failing over due to incorrect reasoning.  Failing over automatically in *test mode* however makes an awful lot of sense!

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