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Category Archives: vCloud Suite

Big Data Virtualization: Talks and Related Events at VMworld 2015

Here is a list of the Big Data technical talks and events at VMworld 2015 for your conference planning. The big data team at VMware will be delighted to see you at some or all of these events during the conference coming soon. Please register for these through the schedule builder on the VMworld website.

Sunday, 30th August

4:00pm VAPP6442-QT Quick Talk on VMware and Big Data

Monday, 31st August

12:30pm VAPP4567 – Big Data Partnering – Cloudera and VMware Work Together

3pm EXPERTS  – Meet the Big Data Experts

Tuesday, 1st September

11:00am Book Signing at DigitalGuru Bookshop in Moscone Lobby

12:00pm Theater Talk and Book Signing at the VMware Booth in Exhibition Hall

1:00pm VAPP6428GD – Group Discussion on Big Data

2:00pm INF4566 – A Customer Deployment with Hadoop on vSphere

4:00pm VAPP4588 – Virtualizing Big Data – a Customer Panel

Wednesday, 2nd September

08:30am CNA4725 – Scalable Cloud-Native Apps

3:30pm INF4551 – Customer Case Study: Skyscape’s Hadoop-in-the-Cloud Deployment

Big Data Hands-on-Lab HOL-SDC-1609 – available on each day of the show

Big Data Extensions/Hadoop Demos – at the vSphere/VSOM pod on the VMware booth

VMworld 2015: Extreme Performance Series

Who loves virtual Performance? Who wants to learn more about it?

Everybody of course!

I’m very excited about this year’s Extreme Performance Series mini-track being hosted at VMworld San Francisco and Barcelona. These sessions are created and presented by VMware’s best and most distinguished performance engineers, architects and gurus. I’ve tried to provide my personal thoughts on each session but these few words will never do them justice. Hope too see you all there!

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Big Data Extensions Version 2.2 – What’s New? A summary of the new features.

The new  vSphere Big Data Extensions Version 2.2 shipped on the 5th June 2015!

Here is a quick summary of the new features that appear in the 2.2 release. This is an exciting and much-awaited release. As always, refer to the technical documents and the release notes to get more detail on these subjects. 

• Support for the Latest Hadoop Distributions. BDE 2.2 supports the latest versions from the major Hadoop distribution vendors, including Bigtop 0.8, Cloudera CDH 5.4, Hortonworks HDP 2.2, MapR 4.1, and Pivotal PHD 3.0.

• Better Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) Management. We found that some users had difficulty with generating FQDNs within their network for newly cloned virtual machines. BDE can now generate and propagate meaningful host names in FQDN form for your new  virtual machines that host the Hadoop nodes. The new FQDNs will be registered to a DNS server if you are using a Dynamic DNS server.

• Shrink clusters. You can now reduce (as well as expand) the number of worker virtual machines that belong to a running Hadoop cluster in an easy way. The virtual machines targeted for shrinking will be quiesced, withdrawn from the Hadoop cluster and then deleted to release any resources that they used completely.

• Active Directory/Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (AD/LDAP) integration. You can use an AD/LDAP server to manage the accounts generated by BDE within the Hadoop nodes . You can specify the accounts to be Hadoop users accounts and/or service accounts in an AD/LDAP server.

• vSphere 6.0 Instant Clone. BDE will, at the user’s request, use Instant Clone technology to spin up new Hadoop VMs. This feature reduces the time of spinning up Hadoop VMs and the runtime footprint. This is an optional way to do this. You can choose to use the older “full clone” method also if you prefer to. We recommend that you use this new type of cloning for your test and development workloads to begin with.
• Centralised logging. You can configure BDE to direct logging information to an external syslog server including LogInsight.
• Quiesce the BDE management server. You can quiesce BDE management server with a command so that you can backup BDE management server’s data for your clusters safely.
• Automatic GUI installation. BDE GUI is automatically registered to the vCenter after BDE is deployed.

• Support for the Latest Partner Hadoop Management Tools. BDE 2.2 supports Cloudera Manager 5.3, and Ambari 1.7. You have more flexibility to deploy Hadoop clusters, including a compute-only cluster,a  HBase-only cluster,a  data-compute separated cluster etc. even when using a Partner Hadoop Management tool.

• Support for the Latest Isilon Version. Fully automated process to deploy and manage compute only clusters on OneFS 7.2.

• Big Data Extensions Upgrade. You can upgrade Big Data Extensions 2.1 to the current version, Big Data Extensions 2.2, and preserve all the data for the Hadoop clusters that were created using Big Data Extensions 2.1. All of your existing clusters can be managed by Big Data Extensions once the upgrade completes.

• Localization. BDE is localized to 6 languages including DE, FR, ZH_CN, ZH_TW, KO, and JA.

Confessions of an Energy Consciousness Mind

I have a confession. 

My data center kit has been using too much energy.

Having kit available at my disposable is great, but I have been wasting this resource when it’s not required by my workloads. And if there’s one thing I try to be conscious of, it’s energy consumption. Just ask my kids who I chase from room to room turning off lights, screens, and the lot when they aren’t using them.

But why not in the data center? Did you know that hosts typically use 60%+ of their peak power when idle?

Until recently, I had overlooked configuring my kit to use the vSphere Distributed Power Management (“DPM”) feature to manage power consumption and save energy.

With the release of vSphere 6.0 it’s a good time to review and take deeper look into the capabilities and benefits of this feature.

What is VMware vSphere Distributed Power Management?

VMware vSphere Distributed Power Management is a feature included with vSphere Enterprise and Enterprise Plus editions that dynamically optimizes cluster power consumption based on workload demands. When host CPU and memory resources are lightly used, DPM recommends the evacuation of workloads and powers-off of ESXi hosts. When CPU or memory resource utilization increases for workloads or additional host resources are required, DPM powers on a required set of hosts back online to meet the demand of HA or other workload-specific contraints by executing vSphere Distributed Resource Scheduler (“DRS”) in a “what-if” mode. DRS will ensure host power recommendations are consistent with the cluster constraints and resources being managed by the cluster.

Beneath the covers there are key challenges that DPM addresses to enable effective power-savings capabilities:

  • Accurately Assessing Workload Resource Demand
  • Avoiding Frequent Power-on/Power-off of Host and Excessive vMotion Operations
  • Rapid Response to Workload Demand and Performance Requirements
  • Appropriate Host Selection for Power-on/Power-Off within Tolerable Host Utilization Ratios
  • Intelligent Redistribution of Workloads After Host Power-on/Power-Off

Once DPM determines the number of hosts needed to satisfy all workloads and relevant constraints, and DRS has distributed virtual machines across hosts to maintain resource allocation constraints and objectives, each powered-on host is free to handle its power management

Hosts Entering and Exiting Standby

When a host is powered-off by DPM, they are marked in vCenter Server in “standby” mode indicating that they are powered-off but available to be powered-on when required. The host icon is updated with a crescent moon overlay symbolizing a “sleeping” state for the host.

DPM can awaken hosts from the standby mode using one of three power management options:

  1. Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI)
  2. Hewlett Packard Integrated Lights-Out (iLO), or
  3. Wake-On-LAN (WOL).

Each protocol requires its own hardware support and configuration. If a host does not support any of these protocols it cannot be put into standby by DPM. If a host supports multiple protocols, they are used in the following order: IPMI, iLO, WOL. This article is focused on the use of the first two.

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Help us improve vSphere!

Are you a vSphere user? If so, we want to hear from you. Attached is our new survey. Help us build a better product and make sure our features are aligned with your business needs.

http://www.surveymethods.com/EndUser.aspx?B094F8E0B1F6ECE7B3

 

Enhancing User Experience: Customization of vRealize Automation 6.2.x Email Notifications

User Experience (“UX”) focuses on the intimate understanding of your users. What is it that they need or desire, what do they value, what are their abilities, as well as their limitations?

As you embark upon the journey to the software-defined data center (SDDC), think and architect in terms of the user experience in addition to “boxes and arrows.”

  • What are the desired UX outcomes for those consuming the service(s)?
  • Have you considered the UX in terms of its usefulness, usability, desirability, accessibility, credibility, and its value?

In addition to fundamental tenant and business group designs, entitlements and service catalogue designs, one such area for UX consideration is the messages provided to those consuming services of the software-defined data center.

For a moment, imagine you are providing automated infrastructure delivery to multiple business segments of a large media and entertainment organization, each with their own distinct brand. The segments are built upon their individual brand and identity.

  • Do you centrally brand the service that you offer or do you tailor the service to each tenant business segment?
  • How would this change if instead the services were used to provide automated infrastructure delivery only to your IT Operations team and not direct end users?

The messages that appear in the inbox of the user are part of the experience. VMware vRealize Automation can send automatic notifications for several types of events, such as, the successful completion of a catalogue request or a required approval workflow.  System Administrators can configure global email servers, senders and recipients that process email notifications.

Tenant Administrators can override those defaults, or add their own servers, senders and recipients if no global attributes are specified. They may even select which events will cause notifications to be sent to their users. Each component, such as the service catalog or infrastructure-as-a-service, can define events that can trigger notifications.

scenarios

Additionally, each user can choose if they wish to receive notifications. Users either receive all notifications configured by the Tenant Administrator or no notifications.

Notification may also have links that allow the user to perform interactively. For example, a notification about a request that requires approval can have one link for approving the request and one for rejecting it. When a user clicks one of the links, a new email opens with content that is automatically generated. The user can send the email to complete the approval.

Messages can be easily and beautifully customized using a simple, powerful template engine. These may be customized per-locale, per-tenant, and per-notification scenario. You have the ability to define and craft the desired user experience for any notification.

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vCenter Server 6 Deployment Topologies and High Availability

Architectural changes to vSphere 6:

vCenter Server 6 has some fundamental architectural changes compared to vCenter Server Server 5.5. The multitude of components that existed in vCenter Server 5.x has been consolidated in vCenter Server 6 to have only two components vCenter Management Server and Platform Services Controller, formerly vCenter Server Single Sign-On.

The Platform Services Controller (PSC) provides a set of common infrastructure services encompassing

  • Single Sign-On (SSO)
  • Licensing
  • Certificate Authority

The vCenter Management Server consolidates all the other components such as Inventory Service & Web Client services along with its traditional management components. The vCenter Server components can be typically deployed in with either embedded or external PSC. Care should be taken to understand the critical differences between the two deployment models. Once deployed one cannot move from one mode to another in this version.

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vCenter Server 6.0 Deployment Guide

VMware_vSphere6_Box

Over the course of the last few months I’ve been working on a pretty massive deployment guide for vCenter Server 6, the result turned into a 100 page guide. Before getting scared off by the size the guide it goes into details for installing and upgrading many different scenarios including new installs and upgrades from the most common configurations.

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VMware Certificate Authority overview and using VMCA Root Certificates in a browser

 

With vSphere 6.0 the vCenter Virtual Server Appliance (VCSA), now has a component called the Platform Services Controller (PSC). The PSC handles things like SSO and the License Server and ships with its own Certificate Authority called VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA). In this blog post we’ll quickly go over some of the modes of VMCA operation and how to download and install the VMCA root certificate into your browser.

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vSphere 6 Feature Walkthroughs

The Technical Marketing team has put out a series of vSphere 6 related feature walkthroughs. We’re covering vCenter Server install and upgrades for many different scenarios as well as vSphere Data Protection and vSphere Replication.

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