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Category Archives: vCloud Suite

vCenter Server 6.0 Deployment Guide

VMware_vSphere6_Box

Over the course of the last few months I’ve been working on a pretty massive deployment guide for vCenter Server 6, the result turned into a 100 page guide. Before getting scared off by the size the guide it goes into details for installing and upgrading many different scenarios including new installs and upgrades from the most common configurations.

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VMware Certificate Authority overview and using VMCA Root Certificates in a browser

 

With vSphere 6.0 the vCenter Virtual Server Appliance (VCSA), now has a component called the Platform Services Controller (PSC). The PSC handles things like SSO and the License Server and ships with its own Certificate Authority called VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA). In this blog post we’ll quickly go over some of the modes of VMCA operation and how to download and install the VMCA root certificate into your browser.

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vSphere 6 Feature Walkthroughs

The Technical Marketing team has put out a series of vSphere 6 related feature walkthroughs. We’re covering vCenter Server install and upgrades for many different scenarios as well as vSphere Data Protection and vSphere Replication.

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vSphere 6 Web Client

With the recent announcement of VMware vSphere 6, I can finally start talking about the improvements we’ve made for vSphere 6 Web Client.  Over 100 enhancements, with some user actions performing 5x faster.  There are excel sheets and graphs full of performance data, but the best way to see the difference is to experience it yourself.  If you’ve been wary of using vSphere Web Client in the past, you should give it another shot with vSphere 6.

In my time here I’ve heard of many tips on using Web Client that I didn’t learn during training or while using it directly.  I thought it would be helpful to put all of these learnings in one place.  I’m sure many of you reading this know about some of these tips, but hopefully there are some new ones in there that are helpful to you as well.  This is a living document, so if there are tips and tricks not on the list, please share with the rest of us by adding it to the list.  I should stress that this is not an official VMware document:

https://en.wikibooks.org/w/index.php?title=VSphere_Web_Client/UI_Tips

Short url: http://tiny.cc/webclientwiki

 

There are also many enhancements in the vSphere 6 Web Client, some of which are highlighted below:

  • Controlling “All Users’ Tasks” for performance

We know that the All Users’ Tasks view of Recent Tasks is an important feature, but  it also turns out to be an incredibly “heavy” feature, which can quickly spiral out of control and impact vCenter Server performance.  The focus of this version of vSphere Web Client was improving performance and giving you more control on customizing your experience.  In order to achieve both of these goals, we had to make it a bit harder to get to All Users’ Tasks.  This will help ensure that your systems will run smoother out of the box, with the option to enable the feature if you need it.  We are also actively working on a better solution for this feature, but couldn’t get it in time for this release.

You’ll see some instructions when you first select All Users’ Tasks, and more detailed steps are in the Release Notes, but I included them here for reference.  Once you’ve enabled this feature, it becomes the default view:

A) Click More Tasks in the Recent Tasks panel to view all users’ tasks.

OR

B) Edit the webclient.properties file and change the “show.allusers.tasks” setting. For large vSphere environments, changing the “show.allusers.tasks” setting can potentially impact performance.

1. Locate the webclient.properties file

For the vCenter Server Appliance, the file is located in the /etc/vmware/vsphere-client/webclient.properties directory.

For vCenter Server on Windows, the file is located in the C:\ProgramData\VMware\vCenterServer\cfg\vsphere-client\webclient.properties directory.

2. Edit the file using a text editor and change show.allusers.tasks=false to show.allusers.tasks=true.

3. That’s it!  No restart of anything should be required.  Go to vSphere Web Client, select “All Users’ Tasks” and it should work.

  • Many performance enhancements

Performance was the primary goal of this release of vSphere Web Client.  Efforts were made to improve the performance of every portion of the interface, and you should see these improvements when you start using vSphere 6.  Here are some of the major areas we worked on: Login and Home page, Summary pages, Networking pages, Related Objects lists, General Navigation, Performance Charts, Action Menus (right click), and reducing unnecessary data retrieval, which also serves to lighten load on vCenter Server.

The net result is that the vSphere 6 Web Client is an entirely new experience and easier to use than previous versions of vSphere Web Client.

  • Tasks where they belong

This was shown at VMworld, but is worth another mention: The tasks pane is now back at the bottom, giving you room to see the information you need.

Tasks at bottom

This comes along with the ability to move and resize panes (we call this Dockable UI), allowing you to customize it to your liking, such as below where Alarms and Work in Progress have been moved to provide a larger workspace.

Dockable UI

  • Reorganized Action menus (right click)

Action menus have been reorganized and flattened so that your actions are easier to find, and placed more familiarly.  It should be much easier to pick up as you transition from the old desktop client to vSphere Web Client.

Action Menus

  • Home menu navigation

The new and improved home button now shows a navigation menu which allows you to jump from wherever you are to one of the common views.  You can now get back to any of the major inventory trees from anywhere in one click!

Homeburger

I hope this overview encourages you to upgrade your existing vCenter Servers to vSphere 6 so that you can experience these improvements (and more!) that we’ve made.

What’s New with vSphere Data Protection 6.0 and vSphere Replication 6.0

There are many interesting items coming out of VMware’s 28 Days of February where customers can learn more about “One Cloud, Any Application, Any Device”. A couple of the biggest items are the announcements of vSphere 6.0 and Virtual SAN 6.0. In this article, we will look at what is new with two of the more popular vSphere features: vSphere Data Protection and vSphere Replication. Perhaps the biggest news with these two features is around vSphere Data Protection. Before vSphere 6.0 and vSphere Data Protection 6.0, there were two editions of vSphere Data Protection: vSphere Data Protection, included with vSphere, and vSphere Data Protection Advanced, which was sold separately. With the release of vSphere Data Protection 6.0, all vSphere Data Protection Advanced functionality has been consolidated into vSphere Data Protection 6.0 and included with vSphere 6.0 Essentials Plus Kit and higher editions. Keep reading to learn more about the advanced functionality now included as part of vSphere Data Protection 6.0.

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vSphere 6 – Clarifying the misinformation

With the Announcement of vSphere 6 this week there is a lot of information being published by various sources. Some of that information is based on old beta builds and is much different than what we’ll see in the final product. In this post I aim to correct some of the information based on the beta builds that’s floating around out there.

First off there’s confusion on the maximum number of virtual machines per cluster vSphere 6 supports. This is in part my fault, when we wrote the What’s New in vSphere 6 white paper the number was 6000. Additional scale testing has been done and that number is now 8000. The what’s new paper will be updated soon to reflect this.

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vSphere APIs for IO Filtering

I’ve been fortunate to have one of our super sharp product line managers, Alex Jauch (twitter @ajauch), spend some time explaining to me one of the new enabling technologies of vSphere 6.0: VAIO.  Let’s take a look at this really powerful capability and see what types of things it can enable and an overview of how it works.

VAIO stands for “vSphere APIs for IO Filtering”

This had for a time colloquially been known as “IO Filters”. Fundamentally, it is a means by which a VM can have its IO safely and securely filtered in accordance with a policy.

VAIO offers partners the ability to put their technology directly into the IO stream of a VM through a filter that intercepts data before it is committed to disk.

Why would I want to do that? What kinds of things can you do with an IO filter?

Well that’s up to our customers and our partners. VAIO is a filtering framework that will initially allow vendors to present capabilities for caching and replication to individual VMs. This will expand over time as partners come on board to write filters for the framework, so you can imagine where this can go for topics such as security, antivirus, encryption and other areas, as the framework matures. VAIO gives us the ability to do stuff to an IO stream in a safe and certified fashion, and manage the whole thing through profiles to ensure we get a view into the IO stream’s compliance with policy!

The VAIO program itself is for partners – the benefit is for consumers who want to do policy based management of their environment and pull in the value of our partner solutions directly into per-VM and indeed per-virtual disk storage management.

When partners create their solutions their data services are surfaced through the Storage Policy Based Management control plane, just like all the rest of our policy-driven storage offerings like Virtual SAN or Virtual Volumes.

Beyond that, because the data services operate at the VM virtual device level, they can also work with just about any type of storage device, again furthering the value of VSAN and VVOLs, and extending the use of these offerings through these additional data services.

How does it work?

The capabilities of a partner filter solution are registered with the VAIO framework, and are surfaced for user interaction in the SPBM Continue reading

Announcing vSphere 6: Virtualize Applications with Confidence

Today, VMware announces vSphere 6, the latest release of the industry-leading virtualization platform, and the first major release of the flagship product in more than three years (read the press release).  vSphere 6 is packed with 650-plus new features and innovations that will empower users to virtualize applications with confidence by delivering increased scale and performance, breakthrough availability, storage efficiencies for virtual machines (VMs), and simplified management for the virtual data center.  vSphere 6 is purpose-built for both scale-up and scale-out applications including newer cloud, mobile, social and big data applications. Following is a sample of the new features:

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New Release: vCenter Server 5.5 Update 2d

Today VMware released an update to its vCenter Server management solution.

vCenter Server 5.5 Update 2d | 27 JAN 2015 | Build 2442329
vCenter Server 5.5 Update 2d Installation Package | 27 JAN 2015 | Build 2442328
vCenter Server Appliance 5.5 Update 2d | 27 JAN 2015 | Build 2442330

Please make sure to review the release notes and download from vmware.com

While this is a minor release it does resolve many issues previously experienced as summarized here:

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Storage and Availability at Partner Exchange 2015

VMware’s 2015 Partner Exchange is now just about one week away, and it’s shaping up to be a great one!

In storage and availability we’ll have a lot to talk about across the board: Some sessions will offer deeper examinations of our current products, others will give you a great exploration of some of the newer things VMware has to showcase.

I’ve made a list of some of the sessions put on by those of us in the storage and availability product team; it’s a good cross section from product marketing, product managers, and technical marketing people such as myself.  Outside of the engineers who actually write the code, these are the people closest to the products you use, so sign up and hear something new.  There are also sessions from our highly experienced field sales and technical teams — the experts at understanding how these products address customer requirements and explaining their value to our customers.

I’m personally doing a technical session with my colleague Rawlinson on Virtual SAN (STO4275) and looking forward to it quite a bit.

Lastly, don’t be shy to come say hello after the sessions.  We love to hear your thoughts, if we’ve got time between activities…

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