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Microsoft Finally Recognizes the Importance of Desktop Virtualization with VECD Licensing Change

Author: Chris Westphal

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By Raj Mallempati – Director, Product Marketing

At long last, Microsoft publicly recognizes a shift in IT computing trends as indicated in their recent announcements around desktop virtualization and their changes to VECD licensing to support the adoption of virtual desktop environments.  By loosening up the restrictive desktop virtualization license policy (VECD), Microsoft has finally bowed to intensive customer pressure.  This validates the acceleration in demand in the desktop virtualization industry that VMware helped start and continues to lead.  Microsoft’s move here is extremely positive for the industry. 

This decrease in Microsoft licensing costs will decrease the overall CAPEX cost, thus building a better business case for VMware View.  Starting July 1, 2010, VECD is going away for customers with Software Assurance (SA) and for those without SA, Virtual Desktop Access (VDA) is available for purchase to allow for VDI environments.  Here are the details:

  • PCs covered under SA will no longer need a separate VECD license, instead this usage right will be included in SA thus eliminating the separate $23 per device fee. 
  • PCs not covered under SA, thin clients or other clients that cannot run a full Windows OS, customers can purchase VDA for $100 per device/year, a $10 decrease from the previous VECD license price.
  • Roaming use rights allows users to be able to access their virtual desktops from secondary devices like home PCS, kiosks and internet cafes without additional licensing costs.
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