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Performance of SQL Server 2017 for Linux VMs on vSphere 6.5

Microsoft SQL Server has long been one of the most popular applications for running on vSphere virtual machines.  Last year there was quite a bit of excitement when Microsoft announced they were bringing SQL Server to Linux.  Over the last year Microsoft has had quite a bit of interest in SQL Server for Linux and it was announced at Microsoft Ignite last month that it is now officially launched and generally available.

VMware and Microsoft have collaborated to validate and support the functionality and performance scalability of SQL Server 2017 on vSphere-based Linux VMs.  The results of that work show SQL Server 2017 for Linux installs easily and has great performance within VMware vSphere virtual machines. VMware vSphere is a great environment to be able to try out the new Linux version of SQL Server and be able to also get great performance.

Using CDB, a cloud database benchmark developed by the Microsoft SQL Server team, we were able to verify that the performance of SQL Server for Linux in a vSphere virtual machine was similar to other non-virtualized and virtualized operating systems or platforms.

Our initial reference test size was relatively small, so we wanted to try out testing larger sizes to see how well SQL Server 2017 for Linux performed as the VM size was scaled up.  For the test, we used a four socket Intel Xeon E7-8890 v4 (Broadwell)-based server with 96 cores (24 cores per socket).  The initial test began with a 24 virtual CPU VM to match the number of physical cores of a single socket.  Additional tests were run by increasing the size of the VM by 24 vCPUs for each test until, in the final test, the VM had 96 total vCPUs.  We configured the virtual machine with 512 GB of RAM and separate log and data disks on an SSD-based Fibre Channel SAN.  We used the same best practices for SQL Server for Linux as what we normally use for the windows version as documented in our published best practices guide for SQL Server on vSphere.

The results showed that SQL Server 2017 for Linux scaled very well as the additional vCPUs were added to the virtual machine. SQL Server 2017 for Linux is capable of scaling up to handle very large databases on VMware vSphere 6.5 Linux virtual machines.

Skylake Update – Oracle Database Performance on vSphere 6.5 Monster Virtual Machines

We were able to get one of the new four-socket Intel Skylake based servers and run some more tests. Specifically we used the Xeon Platinum 8180 processors with 28 cores each. The new data has been added to the Oracle Monster Virtual Machine Performance on VMware vSphere 6.5 whitepaper. Please check out the paper for the full details and context of these updates.

The generational testing in the paper now includes a fifth generation with a 112 vCPU virtual machine running on the Skylake based server. Performance gain from the initial 40 vCPU VM on Westmere-EX to the Skylake based 112 vCPU VM is almost 4x.

The performance gained from Hyper-Threading was also updated and shows a 27% performance gain from the use of Hyper-Threads. The test was conducted by running two 112 vCPU VMs at the same time so that all 224 logical threads are active. The total throughput from the two VMs is then compared with the throughput from a single VM.

My colleague David Morse has also updated his SQL Server monster virtual machine whitepaper with Skylake data as well.

Updated – SQL Server VM Performance with vSphere 6.5, October 2017

Back in March, I published a performance study of SQL Server performance with vSphere 6.5 across multiple processor generations.  Since then, Intel has released a brand-new processor architecture: the Xeon Scalable platform, formerly known as Skylake.

Our team was fortunate enough to get early access to a server with these new processors inside – just in time for generating data that we presented to customers at VMworld 2017.

Each Xeon Platinum 8180 processor has 28 physical cores (pCores), and with four processors in the server, there was a whopping 112 pCores on one physical host!  As you can see, that extra horsepower provides nice database server performance scaling:

Generational SQL Server VM Database Performance

Generational SQL Server VM Database Performance

For more details and the test results, take a look at the updated paper:
Performance Characterization of Microsoft SQL Server on VMware vSphere 6.5

New White Paper: Fast Virtualized Hadoop and Spark on All-Flash Disks – Best Practices for Optimizing Virtualized Big Data Applications on VMware vSphere 6.5

A new white paper is available showing how to best deploy and configure vSphere 6.5 for Big Data applications such as Hadoop and Spark running on a cluster with fast processors, large memory, and all-flash storage (Non-Volatile Memory Express storage and solid state disks). Hardware, software, and vSphere configuration parameters are documented, as well as tuning parameters for the operating system, Hadoop, and Spark.

The best practices were tested on a 13-server cluster, with Hadoop installed on vSphere as well as on bare metal. Workloads for both Hadoop (TeraSort and TestDFSIO) and Spark Machine Learning Library routines (K-means clustering, Logistic Regression classification, and Random Forest decision trees) were run on the cluster. Configurations with 1, 2, and 4 VMs per host were tested as well as bare metal. Among the 4 virtualized configurations, 4 VMs per host ran fastest due to the best utilization of storage as well as the highest percentage of data transfer within a server. The 4 VMs per host configuration also ran faster than bare metal on all Hadoop and Spark tests but one.

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DRS Lens – A new UI dashboard for DRS

DRS Lens provides an alternative UI for a DRS enabled cluster. It gives a simple, yet powerful interface to monitor the cluster real time and provide useful analyses to the users. The UI is comprised of different dashboards in the form of tabs for each cluster being monitored.

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Oracle Database Performance on vSphere 6.5 Monster Virtual Machines

We have just published a new whitepaper on the performance of Oracle databases on vSphere 6.5 monster virtual machines. We took a look at the performance of the largest virtual machines possible on the previous four generations of four-socket Intel-based servers. The results show how performance of these large virtual machines continues to scale with the increases and improvements in server hardware.

Oracle Database Monster VM Performance across 4 generations of Intel based servers on vSphere 6.5

Oracle Database Monster VM Performance on vSphere 6.5 across 4 generations of Intel-based  four-socket servers

In addition to vSphere 6.5 and the four-socket Intel-based servers used in the testing, an IBM FlashSystem A9000 high performance all flash array was used. This array provided extreme low latency performance that enabled the database virtual machines to perform at the achieved high levels of performance.

Please read the full paper, Oracle Monster Virtual Machine Performance on VMware vSphere 6.5, for details on hardware, software, test setup, results, and more cool graphs.  The paper also covers performance gain from Hyper-Threading, performance effect of NUMA, and best practices for Oracle monster virtual machines. These best practices are focused on monster virtual machines, and it is recommended to also check out the full Oracle Databases on VMware Best Practices Guide.

Some similar tests with Microsoft SQL Server monster virtual machines were also recently completed on vSphere 6.5 by my colleague David Morse. Please see his blog post  and whitepaper for the full details.

This work on Oracle is in some ways a follow up to Project Capstone from 2015 and the resulting whitepaper Peeking at the Future with Giant Monster Virtual Machines . That project dealt with monster VM performance from a slightly different angle and might be interesting to those who are also interested in this paper and its results.

 

SQL Server VM Performance with VMware vSphere 6.5

Achieving optimal SQL Server performance on vSphere has been a constant focus here at VMware; I’ve published past performance studies with vSphere 5.5 and 6.0 which showed excellent performance up to the maximum VM size supported at the time.

Since then, there have been quite a few changes!  While this study uses a similar test methodology, it features an updated hypervisor (vSphere 6.5), database engine (SQL Server 2016), OLTP benchmark (DVD Store 3), and CPUs (Intel Xeon v4 processors with 24 cores per socket, codenamed Broadwell-EX).

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Machine Learning on vSphere 6 with Nvidia GPUs – Episode 2

by Hari Sivaraman, Uday Kurkure, and Lan Vu

In a previous blog [1], we looked at how machine learning workloads (MNIST and CIFAR-10) using TensorFlow running in vSphere 6 VMs in an NVIDIA GRID configuration reduced the training time from hours to minutes when compared to the same system running no virtual GPUs.

Here, we extend our study to multiple workloads—3D CAD and machine learning—run at the same time vs. run independently on a same vSphere server.

This is episode 2 of a series of blogs on machine learning with vSphere. Also see:

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Machine Learning on VMware vSphere 6 with NVIDIA GPUs

by Uday Kurkure, Lan Vu, and Hari Sivaraman

Machine learning is an exciting area of technology that allows computers to behave without being explicitly programmed, that is, in the way a person might learn. This tech is increasingly applied in many areas like health science, finance, and intelligent systems, among others.

In recent years, the emergence of deep learning and the enhancement of accelerators like GPUs has brought the tremendous adoption of machine learning applications in a broader and deeper aspect of our lives. Some application areas include facial recognition in images, medical diagnosis in MRIs, robotics, automobile safety, and text and speech recognition.

Machine learning workloads have also become a critical part in cloud computing. For cloud environments based on vSphere, you can even deploy a machine learning workload yourself using GPUs via the VMware DirectPath I/O or vGPU technology.

GPUs reduce the time it takes for a machine learning or deep learning algorithm to learn (known as the training time) from hours to minutes. In a series of blogs, we will present the performance results of running machine learning benchmarks on VMware vSphere using NVIDIA GPUs.

This is episode 1. Also see:

Episode 1: Performance Results of Machine Learning with DirectPath I/O and NVIDIA GPUs

In this episode, we present the performance results of running machine learning benchmarks on VMware vSphere with NVIDIA GPUs in DirectPath I/O mode and on GRID virtual GPU (vGPU) mode.

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Virtual SAN 6.2 Performance with OLTP and VDI Workloads

Virtual SAN is a VMware storage solution that is tightly integrated with vSphere—making storage setup and maintenance in a vSphere virtualized environment fast and flexible. Virtual SAN 6.2 adds several features and improvements, including additional data integrity with software checksum, space efficiency features of RAID-5 and RAID-6, deduplication and compression, and an in-memory client read cache.

We ran several tests to compare the performance of Virtual SAN 6.1 and 6.2 to make sure they were on par with each other.

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