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Tag Archives: Hadoop

Introducing TPCx-HS Version 2 – An Industry Standard Benchmark for Apache Spark and Hadoop clusters deployed on premise or in the cloud

Since its release on August 2014, the TPCx-HS Hadoop benchmark has helped drive competition in the Big Data marketplace, generating 23 publications spanning 5 Hadoop distributions, 3 hardware vendors, 2 OS distributions and 1 virtualization platform. By all measures, it has proven to be a successful industry standard benchmark for Hadoop systems. However, the Big Data landscape has rapidly changed over the last 30 months. Key technologies have matured while new ones have risen to prominence in an effort to keep pace with the exponential expansion of datasets. One such technology is Apache Spark.

spark-logo-trademarkAccording to a Big Data survey published by the Taneja Group, more than half of the respondents reported actively using Spark, with a notable increase in usage over the 12 months following the survey. Clearly, Spark is an important component of any Big Data pipeline today. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, there is also a significant trend towards deploying Spark in the cloud. What is driving this adoption of Spark? Predominantly, performance.

Today, with the widespread adoption of Spark and its integration into many commercial Big Data platform offerings, I believe there needs to be a straightforward, industry standard way in which Spark performance and price/performance could be objectively measured and verified. Just like TPCx-HS Version 1 for Hadoop, the workload needs to be well understood and the metrics easily relatable to the end user.

Continuing on the Transaction Processing Performance Council’s commitment to bringing relevant benchmarks to the industry, it is my pleasure to announce TPCx-HS Version 2 for Spark and Hadoop. In keeping with important industry trends, not only does TPCx-HS support traditional on premise deployments, but also cloud.

I envision that TPCx-HS will continue to be a useful benchmark standard for customers as they evaluate Big Data deployments in terms of performance and price/performance, and for vendors in demonstrating the competitiveness of their products.

 

Tariq Magdon-Ismail

(Chair, TPCx-HS Benchmark Committee)

 

Additional Information:  TPC Press Release

New White Paper: Best Practices for Optimizing Big Data Performance on vSphere 6

A new white paper is available showing how to best deploy and configure vSphere for Big Data applications such as Hadoop and Spark. Hardware, software, and vSphere configuration parameters are documented, as well as tuning parameters for the operating system, Hadoop, and Spark.

The best practices were tested on a Dell 12-server cluster, with Hadoop installed on vSphere as well as on bare metal. Workloads for both Hadoop (TeraSort and TestDFSIO) and Spark (Support Vector Machines and Logistic Regression) were run on the cluster. The virtualized cluster outperformed the bare metal cluster by 5-10% for all MapReduce and Spark workloads with the exception of one Spark workload, which ran at parity. All workloads showed excellent scaling from 5 to 10 worker servers and from smaller to larger dataset sizes.

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Virtualized Hadoop Performance with vSphere 6

A recently published whitepaper shows that not only can vSphere 6 keep up with newer high-performance servers, it thrives on their capabilities.

Two years ago, Hadoop benchmarks were run with vSphere 5.1 on a cluster of 32 dual-socket, quad-core servers. Very good performance was demonstrated, with the optimal virtualized configuration shown to be actually 2% faster than native for TeraSort (see the previous whitepaper).

These benchmarks were recently run on a cluster of the same size, but with ten-core processors, more disks and memory, dual 10GbE networking, and vSphere 6. The maximum dataset size was almost quadrupled to 30TB, to ensure that it is much bigger than the total memory in the cluster (hence qualifying the test as Big Data, by one definition).

The results, summarized in the chart below, show that the optimal virtualized configuration now delivers 12% better performance than native for TeraSort. The primary reason for this excellent performance is the ability of vSphere to map physical hardware resources to virtual hardware that is optimized for scale-out applications. The observed trend, as well as theory based on processor characteristics, indicates that the importance of being able to do this mapping correctly increases as processors become more powerful. The sub-optimal performance of one of the tests is due to the combination of very small VMs and how Hadoop does replication during data creation. On the other hand, small VMs are very advantageous for read-dominated applications, which are typically more common. Taken together with other best practices discussed in the paper, this information can be used to configure Hadoop clusters for the highest levels of performance. Despite all the hardware and software changes over the past two years, the optimal configuration was still found to be four VMs per dual-socket host.

elapsed_time_ratioPlease take a look at the whitepaper for more details on how these benchmarks were run and for analyses on why certain virtual configurations perform so well.