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Content Library Performance Tuning

by Joanna Guan and Davide Bergamasco

The first two posts in this series assessed the performance of some Content Library operations like virtual machine deployment and library synchronization, import and export. In this post we discuss how to fine-tune Content Library settings in order to achieve optimal performance under a variety of operational conditions. Notice that in this post we only discuss the settings that have the most noticeable impact on the overall solution performance. There are several other settings which may potentially affect Content Library performance. We refer the interested readers to the official documentation for the details (the Content Library Service settings can be found here , while the Transfer Service settings can be found here.)

Global Network Bandwidth Throttling

Content Library has a global bandwidth throttling control to limit the overall bandwidth consumed by file transfers. This setting, called Maximum Bandwidth Consumption, affects all the streaming mode operations including library synchronization, VM deployment, VM capture, and item import/export. However, it does not affect direct copy operations, i.e., operations where data is directly copied across ESXi hosts.

The purpose of the Maximum Bandwidth Consumption setting is to ensure that while Content Library file transfers are in progress enough network bandwidth remains available to vCenter Server for its own operations.

The following table illustrates the properties of this setting:

Setting Name Maximum Bandwidth Consumption
vSphere Web Client Path AdministrationàSystem ConfigurationàServicesà
Transfer ServiceàMaximum Bandwidth Consumption
Default Value Unlimited
Unit Mbit/s

Concurrent Data Transfer Control

Content Library has a setting named Maximum Number of Concurrent Transfers that limits the number of concurrent data transfers. This limit applies to all the data transfer operations including import, export, VM deployment, VM capture, and synchronization. When this limit is exceeded, all new operations are queued until the completion of one or more of the operations in progress.

For example, let’s assume the current value of Maximum Number of Concurrent Transfers is 20 and there are 8 VM deployments, 2 VM captures, and 10 item synchronization in progress. A new VM deployment request will be queued because the maximum number of concurrent operations has been reached. As soon as any of those operations completes, the new VM deployment is allowed to proceed.

This setting can be used to improve Content Library overall throughput (not the performance of each individual operation) by increasing the data transfer concurrency when the network is underutilized.

The following table illustrates the properties of this setting:

Setting Name Maximum Number of Concurrent Transfers
vSphere Web Client Path AdministrationàSystem ConfigurationàServicesàTransfer Serviceà
Maximum Number of Concurrent Transfers
Default Value 20
Unit Number

A second concurrency control setting, whose properties are shown in the table below, applies to synchronization operations only. This setting, named Library Maximum Concurrent SyncItems,controls the maximum number of items that a subscribed library is allowed to concurrently synchronize.

Setting Name Library Maximum Concurrent SyncItems
vSphere Web Client Path AdministrationàSystem ConfigurationàServicesà
Content Library ServiceàLibrary Maximum Concurrent SyncItems
Default Value 5
Unit Number

Given that the default value of Maximum Number of Concurrent Transfers is 20 and the default value of Library Maximum Concurrent SyncItems is 5, a maximum of 5 items can concurrently be transferred to a subscribed library during a synchronization operation, while a published library with 5 or more items can be synchronizing with up to 4 subscribed libraries (see Figure 1).  If the number of items or subscribed libraries exceeds these limits, the extra transfers will be queued. Library Maximum Concurrent SyncItems can be used in concert with Maximum Number of Concurrent Transfers to improve the overall synchronization throughput by increasing one or both limits.

 

post3-fig1

Figure 1. Library Synchronization Concurrency Control

 

The following Table summarizes the effect of each of the settings described above on each of the Content Library operations, depending on the data transfer mode.

    Maximum Bandwidth Consumption Maximum Number of Concurrent Transfers Library Maximum Concurrent Sync Items
Streaming Mode VM Deployment/Capture
Import/Export
Synchronization
(Published Library)
Synchronization
(Subscribed Library)
Direct Copy Mode VM Deployment/Capture
Import/Export
Synchronization
(Published Library)
Synchronization
(Subscribed Library)

 

Data Mirroring

Synchronizing library content across remote sites can be problematic because of the limited bandwidth of typical WAN connections. This problem may be exacerbated when a large number of subscribed libraries concurrently synchronize with a published library because the WAN connections originating from this library can easily cause congestion due to the elevated fan-out (see Figure 2).

 

post3-fig2

Figure 2. Synchronization Fan-out Problem

 

This problem can be mitigated by creating a mirror server to cache content at the remote sites.  As shown in Figure 3, this can significantly decrease the level of WAN traffic by avoiding transferring the same files multiple times across the network.

 

post3-fig3b

Figure 3. Data Mirroring Used to Mitigate Fan-Out Problem

 

The mirror server is a proxy Web server that caches content on local storage. The typical location of mirror servers is between the vCenter Server hosting the published library and the vCenter Server(s) hosting the subscribed library(ies). To be effective, the mirror servers must be as close as possible to the subscribed libraries. When a subscribed library attempts to synchronize with the published library, it requests content from the mirror server.  If such content is present on the mirror server, the request is immediately satisfied. Otherwise, the mirror server fetches said content from the published library and stores it locally before satisfying the request from the subscribed library. Any further request for that particular content will be directly satisfied by the mirror server.

A mirror server can be also used in a local environment to offload the data movement load from a vCenter Server or when the backing storage of a published library is not particularly performant. In this case the mirror server is located as close as possible to the vCenter Server hosting the published library as shown in Figure 4.

 

post3-fig4

Figure 4. Data Mirroring Used to Off-Load vCenter Server

 

Example of Mirror Server Configuration

This section provides step-by-step instructions to assist a vSphere administrator in the creation of a mirror server using the NGINX web server (other web servers, such as Apache and Lighttpd, can be used for this purpose as well). Please refer to the NGINX documentation for additional configuration details.

  1. Install the NGINX web server in a Windows or Linux virtual machine to be deployed as close as possible to either the subscribed or the published library depending on the desired optimization (fan-out mitigation or vCenter offload).
  2. Edit the configuration files. The NGINX default configuration file, /etc/nginx/nginx.conf, defines the basic behavior of the web server. Some of the core directives in the nginx.conf file need to be changed.
    • Configure the IP address / name of the vCenter server hosting the published library
         proxy_pass https://<PublishervCenterServer-name-or-IP>:443;
    • Set the valid time for cached files. In this example we assume the contents to be valid for 6 days (this time can be changed as needed):
         proxy_cache_valid any 6d;
    • Configure the cache directory path and cache size. In the following example we use /var/www/cache as the cache directory path on the file system where cached data will be stored. 500MB is the size of the shared memory zone, while 18,000MB is the size of the file storage. Files not accessed within 6 days are evicted from the cache.
         proxy_cache_path /var/www/cache levels=1:2 keys_zone=my-cache:500mmax_size=18000m inactive=6d;
    • Define the cache key. Instruct NGINX to use the request URI as a key identifier for a file:
         proxy_cache_key "$scheme://$host$request_uri";
      When an OVF or VMDK file is updated, the file URL gets updated as well. When a URL changes, the cache key changes too, hence the mirror server will fetch and store the updated file as a new file during a library re-synchronization.
    • Configure HTTP Redirect (code 302)
         handling.error_page  302  = @handler;
         upstreamup_servers {
            serverPublishervCenterServer-name-or-IP:443;
         }
         location @handler{
            set $foo $upstream_http_location;
            proxy_pass $foo;
            proxy_cache my-cache;
            proxy_cache_valid any 6d;
         }
  3. Test the configuration.  Run the following command on the mirror server twice:
       wget  --no-certification-check –O /dev/null https://<MirrorServer-IP-or-Name>/example.ovf
    The first time the command is run the file example.ovf will be fetched from the published content library and copied in some folder within the cache path proxy_cache_path. The second time, there should not be any network traffic between the mirror server and the vCenter hosting the published library as the file will be served from the cache.
  4. Sync library content through mirror server. Create a new subscribed library using the New Library Wizard from the vSphere Web Client. Copy the published library URL in the Subscription URL box and replace the vCenter IP or host name with the mirror server IP or host name (see Figure 5). Then complete the rest of the steps for creating a new library as usual.

 

post3-fig5

Figure 5. Configuring a Subscribed Library with a Mirror Server

 

Note: If the network environment is trusted, a simple HTTP proxy can be used instead of HTTPS proxy in order to improve data transfer performance by avoiding unnecessary data encryption/decryption.

3 thoughts on “Content Library Performance Tuning

  1. gbo

    Thank you for this article 🙂

    Can you post a sample of configuration NGINX.conf please ?

    Regard

    Reply
    1. Davide Bergamasco

      You’re welcome!

      Unfortunately we are no longer able to locate the config files used for the experiments. However, we heavily borrowed from the Nginx documentation. Take a look here for some inspiration: https://www.nginx.com/blog/nginx-caching-guide/

      Hope this helps,

      Davide

      Reply
  2. manu

    Hello Anyone have this config file ready ? It will be of great help. Thanks

    Reply

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