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Fusion for IT

Did you know…

VMware Fusion is a fantastic tool to have in your toolbox if you’re an IT Professional.

Why’s that you ask? Take a look at this video and find out…


VMware Fusion: Mac Virtualization for Everyone

Hi everyone!

Most Mac users know about VMware Fusion and how it’s the best way to run Windows on your Mac… BUT… did you know it’s also the tool of choice for IT, Developers and Businesses looking to get the most out of their hardware investment, or embrace a BYOD culture?

Well if you didn’t, consider this an introduction to how people use Fusion for things OTHER than home users running Windows on the Mac.

Check out our new video below!



Fusion 8.5 Released and Available Now!

Lots of stuff in this announcement, so read on!

Fusion 8.5 Now Available!


Start your upgrade engines, Fusion 8.5 is here!

We’re very proud of our team for achieving this milestone release, which is available as a free update for Fusion 8 customers!

New features include:

  • Support for Windows 10 Anniversary Guests
  • Support for macOS Sierra Host and Guest
  • Ready for Windows Server 2016
  • Tabbed View Support
  • Siri Support
  • Bug Fixes
  • Free for 8.0 Customers!

Grab the bits here: vmware.com/go/getfusion or use the built-in Software Update feature.

We chose to make this a free release for current customers for a few reasons, but largely: “We hear from our users year on year that having to pay for something as small as a minor operating system release gets a little long in the tooth” . Theres a lot going on at VMware this year giving us an opportunity to pause and focus, (but we’re not dead!) so we extended that opportunity to our users with a free upgrade that supports the latest from Apple and Microsoft, while still managing to squeeze in support for a couple of interesting features largely with the help of Apple: Tabs and Siri.



Upgrade Pricing

We also want everyone on the current version, so we’ve extended our upgrade price eligibility going back as far as Fusion 4.0… So, if you’re on Fusion 4, 5 or 6 you can qualify for a huge discount on the price of Fusion. (Oh, and we’re also giving you an additional 15% off Fusion 8 upgrades for 2 days only, and and 33% off Fusion 8 Pro upgrades!! We must be crazy… Or we love our users… you decide!)

Virtual Reality Contest

Oh, and while we’re here, did you hear about our Virtual Reality giveaway? All you have to do is tell us in 30 seconds to a minute ‘Why you love Fusion or Workstation’ and an interesting tale that is unique to you. All the details are available here: store.vmware.com/oculus

VMworld 2016: We Love Fusion and Workstation!

We did a session at VMworld which you can check out here and spoke with some of our fans afterward, here what they have to say about Fusion and Workstation!


Release Notes

Full Release Notes can be found here

Bug fixes in this release include:

  • MS Office applications in Windows virtual machine would sometimes not open the attachment in the mail application on Mac. This issue is resolved.
  • After you import a Parallels 11 virtual machine into VMware Fusion, attempting to power on the virtual machine would fail with the error “Inaccessible Boot Device.”. This issue is resolved.
  • When the Full Screen Minibar was hidden at the edge of the screen, hovering the cursor over it would not make it appear. This issue is resolved.
  • Fusion could crash when you attempt to create a remote virtual machine on vCenter Server 5.5. This issue is resolved.
  • On the Ubuntu 15.10 and later versions guest OS, when you replace open-vm-tools with the VMware Tools version bundled with VMware Fusion, VMware Tools may not work as expected. After you reboot the system, an Ubuntu crash report might appear and one of the services in VMware Tools might stop working. This issue is resolved.
  • Attempts to drag and drop files between the host and a Mac OS virtual machine occasionally fail. This issue is resolved.

We will be issuing point releases to address any issues that may come up after macOS Sierra reaches General Availability later this month.

Hope you enjoy!

VMware Fusion 8.5 Announced!

We’ve been holding in the surprise for some time now but on the keynote stage today at VMworld, Sanjay Poonan, EVP of our End user Computing business unit where Fusion and Workstation are situated, pulled the covers back and revealed the details about our big annual release.

This year we are delivering Fusion 8.5 and Fusion 8.5 Pro, and the big surprise is this: It’s a free upgrade for all current-version customers.  So, if you’re on Fusion 8.1.1, you’re going to be able to upgrade to the latest Fusion with full support for macOS Sierra and Windows 10 Anniversary edition, for free. We’ll also be adding Windows Server 2016 support when it comes available.

The release includes support for some interesting macOS Sierra features, including Tabs and Siri support.

This is an exciting release for us because it marks the first time that we have provided a yearly update for no additional cost to current-version customers. We’ve been holding the surprise in for some time, so we’re very excited to finally share this with the world.

We’ve also changed how users can upgrade to the latest release. Users are eligible for upgrade pricing going back to Fusion 4. So, if you have an old Fusion license and haven’t upgraded in a few years, there’s never been a better time.


Tabs! With macOS Sierra, you can now bring all those VM’s into a single window


Hey Siri, Open Microsoft Edge

This also marks the release of VMware Workstation 12.5 Pro and Player editions, which you can read more about here. We expect all 4 products (Fusion, Fusion Pro, Workstation Pro and Workstation Player) to release mid-September.

So if you’re still on Fusion 7 or older, you can upgrade to 8.1.1 today and know that we’ve got your back by making sure you’ll be able to run the latest and greatest from Microsoft and Apple!

We’re Giving Away 20 Oculus Rift Headsets. Want One?

Oculus Rift headsets

Yes, you read that right. Twenty virtual reality headsets. Wow.

Of course, writing to me and asking for one won’t cut it; you have to work a little harder than that.

Continue reading

Fusion is picking up the tab…

Hah, tab… see what I did there?

Here’s a sneak peek at something we’re very excited about…


One of the new features of macOS Sierra people are talking about has been native tabs for apps, and let me tell you I’m pretty excited about it. Seriously, the folks in our office are probably getting tired of me geeking-out over this by now…

Our users have been asking us for this feature for a while, and we had heard wind that Apple was going to open this up so we didn’t have to figure out a custom implementation. Good things come to those who wait =)

This feature is something I think “other Mac-based virtualization tools” will have a hard time doing…

Part of our design philosophy is to consistently use native UI elements wherever possible. This ethos applies not only to Fusion, but also to Workstation and Player where we have native UI for Linux built on GTK, for example.

In the case of OS X / macOS, we have always had a better time when we implement things that are standard UI elements within the Apple ecosystem. This year our design philosophy really pays off with our ability to natively support multiple running VM’s in a tabbed interface on macOS Sierra.

So, by upgrading to Fusion 8 and macOS Sierra, users will just get this feature by default. Yes, I said Fusion 8 😉

Enabling it is pretty simple, even if it is a little different than how you’re used to opening tabs in Safari or Finder.

With Fusion you need to have 2 or more VMs open (the Library Window does not count).

With the VM window active, go to the Window menu and click ‘Merge All Windows’.



There’s no fancy animation yet, and I expect Apple will probably add that later on.

So for folks using more than 1 VM, this is a pretty exciting feature!

We have more surprises in store for this year’s release, and with VMworld looming we’re getting very excited, and can’t wait to share the news! Stay tuned!

Meet the team!

One of our signs at our Palo Alto campus

The Fusion and Workstation teams are having a very busy year. Since we shipped Fusion 8 and Workstation 12 almost a year ago, we’ve been busy adding new skills to the development teams so that we can take the products in a new and compelling direction. Added to that, the team has released several updates that you really should be loading on to your systems – they make the products better in a bunch of ways that are described here, here and here.

Given that some of the new features we’re working on are aimed at developers, we recently sponsored a Macworld party at WWDC so that people could meet the me and the rest of the management team. I was impressed by how passionate and supportive the party-goers were, and we certainly learned a lot. Our backlog of ideas almost doubled!


Early shot of the rooftop Patio Party with Macworld and friends during WWDC 2016, VMware’s Andy Morris can be seen on the very right in the middle of some intense conversation with our eStore team director, Michael B.

More sober and back in the office, it occurred to us that more people might like to meet the team too. The management team is boring, that’s just the five of us Powerpoint jockies; the real teams that do the hard work of building, delivering and supporting the products are a diverse group of people spread all over the world.

Our Palo Alto braintrust. Without these geniuses, we wouldn't be having this conversation!

Our Palo Alto braintrust. Without these geniuses, we wouldn’t be having this conversation! Ooh, and check out the turtles in our pond!

The core compute, storage and network guys work on all of VMware’s hypervisors and are known as Layer 1. These guys build the hypervisor as well as our Virtual Devices (all the “hardware” that Windows/guests see), the Graphics stack, the Networking stack, VMware Tools, VMRC (the ‘console’ view), USB devices, and the list goes on… In the photo is about half of the group. Every one of the people in this photo is a certifiable genius, and without these guys, a whole industry would not exist.

Our Hosted UI and Quality teams

Our Hosted UI and Quality teams

Once they’ve done their voodoo, as they do, they pass the base code to these guys, our Hosted-UI (Product) and QE (Quality) teams. These folks have the incredibly difficult task of turning what is basically just cool tech, in to the products you love. And they do it exceedingly well. Every time we do a customer survey, Workstation and Fusion score the highest of all our products for quality and satisfaction. Our Hosted-UI team members, past and present, put in a lot of hours making Fusion and Workstation the amazing products they are today, and for that we can’t begin to express our gratitude.  By the same extension, we couldn’t be more excited about what we have in store for the future!


The Support team!

The Support team!

Of course, even with awesome quality control, sometimes you just need help solving a problem, and that’s where these guys come in. This is about half of our 24 hour, 7 days a week, Fusion and Workstation support staff. These guys are the ones we listen to the most. Building new products is fun, but we’re very aware that you rely on them to solve real world problems. These guys are our canaries, our triage, our compass. We couldn’t do it without them.


This combined team is working tirelessly to support you in your business. They’ve got a great surprise lined up for Q3, something very interesting for Q4, and something very big for H1. It’s not easy delivering a product that is downloaded almost 5 million times a year, but these people are the very best at what they do, and we’re proud to have them with us.


Fix for installing macOS Sierra as a VM

## UPDATE: This fix in this post is no longer required if you have Fusion 8.5, the fix is included ##


I love our dev teams.

These folks work tirelessly to make sure that the crazy complexity that is Fusion and Workstation are able to support both the latest and greatest as well as the ancient and obsolete.

In this particular case, Apple had released a Developer Preview of their latest iteration of their Mac operating system previously called OS X. The new macOS Sierra has plenty of features to delight, but installing it in a virtual machine with VMware Fusion to test it out was met with some complications that I wrote about.

That workaround was a bit of an exercise, but our team has a more graceful fix ready to go now.

It’s a pretty small patch, only a couple of lines changed for one of our supporting scripts, but it makes the entire process as easy as ‘drag .app onto the New VM wizard, click next, wait for the magic to delight you’.

The Fix:

We need to replace a single file that’s located in your VMware Fusion app bundle.

To do this, go to your /Applications folder and right-click / ctrl-click the VMware Fusion.app

Select ‘Show Package Contents’

Navigate into Contents > Library

There’s a file in there called ‘Create Mavericks Installer.tool’. We must replace this with the patched one.

You can download the patched file from our newly-created “officially unofficial” Github page located here:




I plan on using this Github space to host random patch files and other interesting stuff, so feel free to fork and submit a pull request if you think there’s something we could do better in this script or anything else we post up there in the future.  It’s not exactly ‘Open Source VMware Fusion’, but it’s a step in the right direction I think 😉

So go ahead, download the .tool file, replace the existing one with the patched one and get your macOS on!

Github users you know what to do, for folks that may be new to Github just click the green ‘clone or download’ button and choose ‘download .zip’.


Fusion doesn’t even need to be powered off.

Once you replace the file you should be able to click ‘File > New’ in Fusion, and simply drop the ‘Install 10.12 Developer Preview.app’ directly onto the New VM wizard.


Forgot about permissions… You’ll have to adjust permissions at the command line with the following 2 commands:

sudo chmod 755 /Applications/VMware\ Fusion.app/Contents/Library/Create\ Mavericks\ Installer.tool
sudo xattr -rc /Applications/VMware\ Fusion.app/Contents/Library/Create\ Mavericks\ Installer.tool

If you have the windows open in Finder you can just type ‘sudo chmod 755’ and then drag and drop the Create Mavericks Installer.tool onto the Terminal window. Or be lazy and just paste what I wrote above which will work on any system 😉

Simple as that!


macOS Sierra and VMware Fusion 8

Hot off the heels of WWDC, Apple has made available the next major update to it’s flagship operating system for Mac. With a new name, macOS, Apple seems to be getting away from the OS X moniker and aligning with the rest of the OS’s that it has in it’s bag: tvOS, iOS, watchOS, and now macOS.

Users have been excited to run this in a VM to test, but it doesn’t “just work” in Fusion yet unfortunately. The reason is that Developer Preview builds have debugging code included which changes the memory layout of the installer. We specifically require a certain block layout of the .app to create the bootable install image, but because the layout is different due to debugging code, it fails with an ‘Internal Error’.

There are 2 ways to get around this:

  1. Install 10.11 and upgrade it to 10.12
  2. Manually create the bootable install image and attach it to an empty 10.11 VM.

The first one is pretty easy, and you can make an OS X 10.11 VM using the recovery partition with just a couple of clicks from File > New.

Once it’s up and you’ve installed VMware Tools, you can drag the ‘Install 10.12 Developer Preview.app’ onto the desktop of your 10.11 VM, double-click it and begin the install.

For folks that don’t have the time or who want to walk through a fresh installation there is a multi-step method that I’ve written about here that will show you the way and explain what’s happening along the trip.


For folks who want to run Sierra on the Mac itself and use Fusion, there is a bit of a bug that we’re working on, but there’s an easy workaround.

Currently if you try to run a VM it will fail/crash with an ‘Internal Error’.

The simple work around for now is to disable 3D graphics acceleration (per-VM setting). 

It’s possible that this ‘goes away’ when Apple moves to the public beta branch (it has different debugging code enabled than the developer previews), but we’ll be keeping a close eye on things as they develop and share what we learn.

Overall, I’ve found that macOS Sierra as a Host and as a Guest work pretty well. Siri tends to work better on the Host in my experience, so we’ll be examining how to make it a smooth experience in a VM as well. For now, my advice is to speak slowly to her when she’s ‘trapped’ in a VM 😉

(talking about AI with ‘he’ and ‘she’ is weird… welcome to the future!)

Fusion 8.1.1 Available Now with Important Networking fixes!

Hi Everyone,

Over the weekend we rolled out an update to Fusion 8 and Fusion 8 Pro that brings our version to 8.1.1.

The important fix has resolved a NAT port forwarding and DNS lookup issues that some users have been experiencing, particularly those who work with Hashicorp’s Vagrant plugin for VMware.

We’ve also addressed USB issues, Fusion crashes related to graphics, and we’ve plugged up a memory leak.

Get it via auto-update today, or grab the download directly from your MyVMware portal or our trial pages (you can drag the trial right over the copy in your /Applications folder, all your licensing and preference information is saved elsewhere)


Details from the release notes:

The following issues were resolved in this version of VMware Fusion.

  • Resolved: Running graphic software with MSAA enabled causes VMware Fusion to crash
    • In a Windows virtual machine, running graphic software, such as a Realtime Landscape Architect program, or a graphic game, such as Civilization 4, with Multisample anti-aliasing (MSAA) enabled causes VMware Fusion to crash.
  • Resolved: Resizing the window of a running virtual machine causes host-system memory to leak
    • Resizing the window of a running virtual machine by dragging its corner causes the amount of system memory used to increase. You can observe the memory usage by looking at the Memory Used value on the Memory tab of the Activity Monitor.
  • Resolved: Enabling port forwarding breaks NAT
    • Enabling any port forwarding prevents the vmnat supporting application to fail to perform Network Address Translation functions
  • Resolved: Installing an automatic update unexpectedly suspends remote virtual machines
    • In VMware Fusion, after you connect to a remote virtual machine stored on either an ESXi server or a Workstation Server instance, as Fusion updates, the automatic update suspends or shuts down the running remote virtual machine, in addition to the running virtual machines that are stored on the local disk.
  • Resolved: Connecting specific USB devices to a virtual machine through a USB 3.0 controller causes issues
    • In VMware Fusion 8.1, the following situations occur when you connect the specified USB devices to a virtual machine through a USB 3.0 controller:
      • USB 3.0 scanner – this type of device does not function inside a virtual machine.
      • USB 3.0 flash drive – you cannot format this type of device inside a virtual machine.