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VMware vSphere 6 and Oracle 12c Scalability Study: Scaling Monster Virtual Machines

vSphere 6 introduces the ability to run virtual machines (VMs) with up to 128 virtual CPUs (vCPUs) and 4TB of RAM. This doubles the number of vCPUs supported from the previous version and increases the amount of RAM by four times. This new capability provides the potential for customers to run larger workloads than ever before in a virtual machine.

A series of tests were run with a virtual machine hosting Oracle 12c database instances. The DVD Store 2.1 open-source transactional workload was used to measure the performance of a large “Monster” VM on vSphere 6. The Oracle 12c database VM was scaled from 15 vCPUs all the way up to 120 vCPUs, and the maximum achieved throughput was measured. The full results and test details have been published in a white paper – VMware vSphere 6 and Oracle 12c Scalability Study: Scaling Monster Virtual Machines.

A four-socket Intel Xeon E7-4890 v2 processor based server with 1TB of memory was used to host the virtual machine for the tests.  Each Xeon E7-4890 v2 processor has 15 cores / 30 threads with Hyper Threading enabled for a total of 60 cores / 120 threads for the system. The diagram below shows the basic test configuration.

vSphere6OracleArchDiagram

 

In all tests Hyper-Threading was enabled on the server, but in configurations where 60 vCPUs or less are assigned to the VM, Hyper-Threads are not used by the VM. This is a result of the default scheduling policy where the preference is for vCPUs to be scheduled on one thread per core before using the second thread of any core. This first set of results, shown below, is focused on the tests that scale up to 60 vCPUs. These tests show the scaling for the virtual machine without the use of Hyper-Threads

vSphere6OraScaleUpto60

While vSphere 6 supports up to 128 vCPUs per VM, these tests were limited to 120 vCPUs due to the number of threads available on the server. The largest VM configuration used both hardware execution threads (Hyper-Threads) on all the processor cores in order to reach 120 vCPUs. In this case, there is one vCPU per execution thread.

Hyper-Threading doubles the number of execution threads, but it does not double performance. In order to measure the scale-up performance of the 120-vCPU VM, a 60-vCPU VM was configured with CPU affinity so that it was limited to only two of the server’s four sockets. In this configuration the 60-vCPU VM has one vCPU per execution thread, which is the same as the 120-vCPU VM.  Configuring a 60-vCPU VM in this way makes it easy to see the scale up performance at 120 vCPUs on this server with hyper-threads enabled.

The results of the scale-up testing using the 60-vCPU VM configured with CPU affinity to only 2 sockets and the 120-vCPU VM using all four sockets showed approximately linear scaling, as shown in the graph below.

vSphere6OraScaleUpto120

For full test details and more test results please see the white paper that has was recently published.

The new larger “Monster” VM support in vSphere 6 allows for virtual machines that can support larger workloads than ever before with excellent performance. These tests show that large virtual machines running on vSphere 6 can scale up as needed to meet extreme performance demands.

 

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