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Category Archives: ESXi

vSphere Hardening Guide 6.0 Public Beta 1 available

I’m happy to announce that the vSphere 6 Hardening Guide Public Beta 1 is now available.

The guide is being provided as Excel spreadsheet. I’m also making a PDF doc available for easier viewing. In addition,  I’ve also included an Excel spreadsheet of the guidelines that have moved out of the guide and into documentation. THIS IS INCOMPLETE. We are still working on some of that content. (that’s why this is a beta!)

Please read the blog on the changes that have happened to the guide. LOTS of changes and the blog will explain.

vSphere 6.0 Hardening Guide – Overview of coming changes | VMware vSphere Blog – VMware Blogs

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Confessions of an Energy Consciousness Mind

I have a confession. 

My data center kit has been using too much energy.

Having kit available at my disposable is great, but I have been wasting this resource when it’s not required by my workloads. And if there’s one thing I try to be conscious of, it’s energy consumption. Just ask my kids who I chase from room to room turning off lights, screens, and the lot when they aren’t using them.

But why not in the data center? Did you know that hosts typically use 60%+ of their peak power when idle?

Until recently, I had overlooked configuring my kit to use the vSphere Distributed Power Management (“DPM”) feature to manage power consumption and save energy.

With the release of vSphere 6.0 it’s a good time to review and take deeper look into the capabilities and benefits of this feature.

What is VMware vSphere Distributed Power Management?

VMware vSphere Distributed Power Management is a feature included with vSphere Enterprise and Enterprise Plus editions that dynamically optimizes cluster power consumption based on workload demands. When host CPU and memory resources are lightly used, DPM recommends the evacuation of workloads and powers-off of ESXi hosts. When CPU or memory resource utilization increases for workloads or additional host resources are required, DPM powers on a required set of hosts back online to meet the demand of HA or other workload-specific contraints by executing vSphere Distributed Resource Scheduler (“DRS”) in a “what-if” mode. DRS will ensure host power recommendations are consistent with the cluster constraints and resources being managed by the cluster.

Beneath the covers there are key challenges that DPM addresses to enable effective power-savings capabilities:

  • Accurately Assessing Workload Resource Demand
  • Avoiding Frequent Power-on/Power-off of Host and Excessive vMotion Operations
  • Rapid Response to Workload Demand and Performance Requirements
  • Appropriate Host Selection for Power-on/Power-Off within Tolerable Host Utilization Ratios
  • Intelligent Redistribution of Workloads After Host Power-on/Power-Off

Once DPM determines the number of hosts needed to satisfy all workloads and relevant constraints, and DRS has distributed virtual machines across hosts to maintain resource allocation constraints and objectives, each powered-on host is free to handle its power management

Hosts Entering and Exiting Standby

When a host is powered-off by DPM, they are marked in vCenter Server in “standby” mode indicating that they are powered-off but available to be powered-on when required. The host icon is updated with a crescent moon overlay symbolizing a “sleeping” state for the host.

DPM can awaken hosts from the standby mode using one of three power management options:

  1. Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI)
  2. Hewlett Packard Integrated Lights-Out (iLO), or
  3. Wake-On-LAN (WOL).

Each protocol requires its own hardware support and configuration. If a host does not support any of these protocols it cannot be put into standby by DPM. If a host supports multiple protocols, they are used in the following order: IPMI, iLO, WOL. This article is focused on the use of the first two.

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Enable Auto Deploy on vCenter Server Appliance (vCSA) 6

Many customers are now converting over to use the vCenter Server Appliance 6.0 since vSphere 6 has reached feature parity with the Windows vCenter Server.

For those of you who are new to using the appliance, I figured I would walk you through setting up the Auto Deploy portion of the server. Continue reading

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vSphere 6: Updates to Host Profiles

Host Profiles_v2

With the announcement of vSphere 6 becoming Generally Available, I figure it a good time to shine some light on some of the updated features of Host Profiles. Host Profiles allow you to establish standard configurations for your ESXi hosts and to automate compliance to these configurations, simplifying operational management of large-scale environments and reducing errors caused by misconfigurations. In this release we’ve made several improvements which will make updates and applying of Host Profiles easier and with minimal disruption.

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vSphere 6.0 Lockdown Modes

Lockdown mode has been around in various forms for many releases. The behaviors have changed a few times since 5.1 with varying levels of usability success. For vSphere 6.0 we are trying to address some of these issues. Personally, what I’d love to see happen with all customers running V6.0 is that you run at a minimum the “Normal” Lockdown Mode.

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vCenter Server 6 Deployment Topologies and High Availability

Architectural changes to vSphere 6:

vCenter Server 6 has some fundamental architectural changes compared to vCenter Server Server 5.5. The multitude of components that existed in vCenter Server 5.x has been consolidated in vCenter Server 6 to have only two components vCenter Management Server and Platform Services Controller, formerly vCenter Server Single Sign-On.

The Platform Services Controller (PSC) provides a set of common infrastructure services encompassing

  • Single Sign-On (SSO)
  • Licensing
  • Certificate Authority

The vCenter Management Server consolidates all the other components such as Inventory Service & Web Client services along with its traditional management components. The vCenter Server components can be typically deployed in with either embedded or external PSC. Care should be taken to understand the critical differences between the two deployment models. Once deployed one cannot move from one mode to another in this version.

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VMware Certificate Authority overview and using VMCA Root Certificates in a browser


With vSphere 6.0 the vCenter Virtual Server Appliance (VCSA), now has a component called the Platform Services Controller (PSC). The PSC handles things like SSO and the License Server and ships with its own Certificate Authority called VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA). In this blog post we’ll quickly go over some of the modes of VMCA operation and how to download and install the VMCA root certificate into your browser.

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vSphere 6 Feature Walkthroughs

The Technical Marketing team has put out a series of vSphere 6 related feature walkthroughs. We’re covering vCenter Server install and upgrades for many different scenarios as well as vSphere Data Protection and vSphere Replication.

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vSphere 6 – Clarifying the misinformation

With the Announcement of vSphere 6 this week there is a lot of information being published by various sources. Some of that information is based on old beta builds and is much different than what we’ll see in the final product. In this post I aim to correct some of the information based on the beta builds that’s floating around out there.

First off there’s confusion on the maximum number of virtual machines per cluster vSphere 6 supports. This is in part my fault, when we wrote the What’s New in vSphere 6 white paper the number was 6000. Additional scale testing has been done and that number is now 8000. The what’s new paper will be updated soon to reflect this.

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