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Author Archives: Adam Bloom

About Adam Bloom

Adam Bloom has worked for 15+ years in the tech industry and has been a key contributor to the VMware vFabric Blog for the past year. He first started working on cloud-based apps in 1998 when he led the development and launch of WebMD 1.0’s B2C and B2B apps. He then spent several years in product marketing for a J2EE-based PaaS/SaaS start-up. Afterwards, he worked for Siebel as a consultant on large CRM engagements, then launched their online community and ran marketing operations. At Oracle, he led the worldwide implementation of Siebel CRM before spending some time at a Youtube competitor in Silicon Valley and working as a product marketer for Unica's SaaS-based marketing automation suite. He graduated from Georgia Tech with high honors and an undergraduate thesis in human computer interaction.

Tomcat 8: Websocket, Lamda Expressions, SpringOneG2X & More

The first release candidate of Apache Tomcat 8 is now available as an alpha release. This release is intended to allow for testing and feedback. It is not intended for production use.

One of Pivotal’s senior engineers, leading expert, and Tomcat contributor, Mark Thomas, made the announcement on Tuesday via Apache Tomcat mailing lists. Tomcat 8.0 supports the Java SE 7 specifications including, Java Servlet 3.1, JavaServer Pages 2.3, Java Unified Expression Language 3.0, and the new Java WebSocket 1.0 specifications.

Developed in parallel, Thomas had previously explained how specifications and releases are related, “As the work on the specifications proceeds, and, as the changes firm up, then those changes will be implemented in the Tomcat 8 branch.”

Thomas outlined Tomcat 8 at his ApacheCon Europe 2012 presentation, “Apache Tomcat 8 Preview” in Sinsheim, Germany. Continue reading

7 Myths on Big Data—Avoiding Bad Hadoop and Cloud Analytics Decisions

Hadoop is an open source legend built by software heroes.

Yet, legends can sometimes be surrounded by myths—these myths can lead IT executives down a path with rose-colored glasses.

Data and data usage is growing at an alarming rate.  Just look at all the numbers from analysts—IDC predicts a 53.4% growth rate for storage this year, AT&T claims 20,000% growth of their wireless data traffic over the past 5 years, and if you take at your own communications channels, its guaranteed that the internet content, emails, app notifications, social messages, and automated reports you get every day has dramatically increased.  This is why companies ranging from McKinsey to Facebook to Walmart are doing something about big data.

Just like we saw in the dot-com boom of the 90s and the web 2.0 boom of the 2000s, the big data trend will also lead companies to make some really bad assumptions and decisions.

Hadoop is certainly one major area of investment for companies to use to solve big data needs. Companies like Facebook that have famously dealt well with large data volumes have publicly touted their successes with Hadoop, so its natural that companies approaching big data first look to the successes of others.  A really smart MIT computer science grad once told me, “when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.” This functional fixedness is the cognitive bias to avoid with the hype surrounding Hadoop. Hadoop is a multi-dimensional solution that can be deployed and used in different way. Let’s look at some of the most common pre-concieved notions about Hadoop and big data that companies should know before committing to a Hadoop project: Continue reading

How fast is a Rabbit? Basic RabbitMQ Performance Benchmarks

One of the greatest things about RabbitMQ is the community that surrounds it. With open source at its roots, people come together to share their code, their knowledge and their stories of how they’ve deployed it in their projects. At a recent meetup near Nice, France, database engineer Adina Mihailescu shared a presentation on choosing messaging systems. Supported by Murial Salvan’s benchmark comparing ActiveMQ, RabbitMQ, HornetQ, Apollo, QPID, and ZeroMQ, they shared some interesting performance comparisons that we’d like to share with you.

In a single laptop benchmark, Salvan ran four different scenarios in order to obtain some insight on performance of the default setups for these messaging solutions. Each test had 1 process dedicated to enqueuing and another dedicated to dequeuing. The message volume and size ranged from 200 to 20,000 to 200,000 messages and 32 to 1024 to 32768 bytes. Both persistent and transient queues and messages were used. Continue reading

10 Ways to Make Hadoop Green in the CFO’s Eyes

Hadoop is used by some pretty amazing companies to make use of big, fast data—particularly unstructured data. Huge brands on the web like AOL, eBay, Facebook, Google, Last.fm, LinkedIn, MercadoLibre, Ning, Quantcast, Spotify, Stumbleupon, Twitter, as well as some more brick and mortar giants like GE, Walmart, Morgan Stanley, Sears, and Ford use Hadoop.

Why? In a nutshell, companies like McKinsey believe the use of big data and technologies like Hadoop will allow companies to better compete and grow in the future.

Hadoop is used to support a variety of valuable business capabilities—analysis, search, machine learning, data aggregation, content generation, reporting, integration, and more. All types of industries use Hadoop—media and advertising, A/V processing, credit and fraud, security, geographic exploration, online travel, financial analysis, mobile phones, sensor networks, e-commerce, retail, energy discovery, video games, social media, and more. Continue reading

Understanding Speed and Scale Strategies for Big Data Grids and In-Memory Colocation

The new database is opening up significant career opportunities for data modelers, admins, architects, and data scientists. In parallel, it’s transforming how businesses use data. It’s also making the traditional RDBMS look like a T-REX. 

Our web-centric, social media, and internet-of-things are acting as a sea-change to break traditional data design and management approaches. Data is coming in at increasing speeds, and 80% of it cannot be easily organized into the neat little rows and columns associated with the traditional RDBMS.

Additionally, executives are realizing the power of bigger and faster data—responding to customer demands in real-time. They want analysis, insights, and business answers in real-time. They want the analysis to be done on data that is integrated across systems. And, they don’t want to wait a day to load it into a data warehouse or data mart. As a result, developers are changing how they build applications.  They are using different tools, different design patterns, and even different forms of SQL to parse data. Continue reading

What 10 Partners Are Saying About vFabric Today

When you are a software company like VMware, you are tied to the success of your partners in the field standing shoulder to shoulder with your customers, guiding them to a successful deployment. Their success and growth directly reflects your customer’s success as your own success in the marketplace.

Partners are focused on solutions that customers care about because it is the only way to stay in business and grow.  Today, 10 representatives from technology consulting organizations share their perspectives on how they are using the VMware vFabric Suite to achieve success with customers. Each includes a video or you can visit the full vFabric playlist on VMwareTV.

1. Modernizing Legacy Apps to Cloud and SaaS with vFabric

“In vFabric we see a very attractive modern cloud application platform.  So while spring and vFabric represent very attractive alternatives for new application development, what we see with our clients are is the desire to modernize and transform existing applications to take advantage of those same benefits of vFabric.  The run time benefits, the design time benefits.”—Chase Crawson, Director of Application Services, CSC Continue reading

Scaling Real-Time Comments @ HuffPost Live with RabbitMQ

Last week, one of the engineering leaders from Huffingtonpost.com presented at the Erlang Factory, a 2-day conference held in San Francisco with 50+ speakers across 8 tracks (not the cassette kind). Among the presenters was, Adam Denenberg, VP of Engineering at the Huffington Post and HuffPost Live. Besides leading the engineering teams for Huffingtonpost.com and HuffPost Live, Adam is also responsible for community products and advertising platforms.

By using RabbitMQ, SockJS, Cowboy, Erlang, and more, his team built a highly scalable, customizable solution for real-time comments based on websockets.  His talk, Realtime Web @ HuffingtonPost, was for developers of real-time, Erlang-based solutions—he covered architecture, lessons learned, pitfalls, and future improvements. The presentation objectives included:

  • Why they went with Erlang and SockJS for the commenting platform
  • How they integrated RabbitMQ routing to power the subscription architecture
  • How they managed subscriptions for real time channels
  • Their plans to extend the framework into an open source solution
  • Where they want other mechanisms for publishing comments outside of RabbitMQ Continue reading

Join Us at Strata – Feb 26-28 in Santa Clara

The vFabric and Greenplum teams will be at Strata on Feb 26-28 at the Santa Clara Convention Center.

While the Pivotal Initiative is forming, both vFabric and Greenplum groups will be represented separately. Of course, you can also learn what’s going on by checking out Strata Greenplum or Strata VMware on Twitter.

If you aren’t familiar with Strata, it is a great conference for those building apps in the cloud. Its focus is all about the future of big data and how to use big data successfully. Speakers include representatives from Google, VMware, Amazon, Microsoft, and many other software companies focused in the big data space. Topics include: Continue reading

Q&A with Shay Banon: 10 “Bonsai Cool” Things About elasticsearch

We are very fortunate to post an interview with Shay Banon, the founder of elasticsearch. Elasticsearch is technology that is very popular among some of the coolest companies on the web today, including  SoundCloud, StumbleUpon, Mozilla and Klout. These companies use elasticsearch to help them deploy powerful search capabilities in their applications that are easy to set up, scalable and built for the cloud.  In this interview, we get to learn all kinds of cool things:

  1. How Shay got into search
  2. How he came up with the idea for elasticsearch
  3. Why elastic search is different than other OSS search projects
  4. Example elasticsearch users like Foursquare, Brewster, GitHub, Sony, and Klout
  5. About the elasticsearch architecture for big data
  6. The strategy behind JSON over HTTP for search
  7. Connecting elasticsearch with RabbitMQ
  8. Connecting elasticsearch with Spring
  9. Connecting elasticsearch with GemFire
  10. Running elasticsearch on virtualized infrastructure

Without further ado, here is the interview.

Q1. So, how did you end up getting into search?
About 10 years ago, I moved from Israel to London because my wife was going to study to be a chef at the Cordon Bleu. I had no job. I was in a new country. I was unemployed. So, I started to get into the latest, cool, new technologies. Continue reading

What’s New in vFabric Web Server 5.2.1

For those that may have missed it, vFabric Web Server 5.2.1 is now available.
Here is the list of new features and changes:

  • Updated Apache Portable Runtime. The Apache Portable Runtime (APR) is upgraded from 1.4.5 to 1.4.6.
  • Disabled SSL/TLS Compression. OpenSSL compression is now disabled by default for protection against the CRIME exploit vector. The mod_ssl “SSLCompression on” configuration option is added to allow the administrator to re-enable compression. See Vulnerability Summary for CVE-2012-4929. Continue reading