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Tag Archives: nfvi

Industry’s first Open VNF Onboarding Hackathon a great success!

MWC 2017 was the venue chosen by VMware, Intel and Cloudify to kick off a co-innovation project to address one of the biggest challenges to the rapid deployment of NFV-based services: VNF onboarding. Continue reading

Network Functions Virtualisation – ‘a key focus for VMware vForum Singapore’

VMware vForum is here again!  The Singapore vForum will takes place at the Marina Bay Sands Convention Center on 15th November. vForum is a complimentary one-day event that offers a unique setting for IT and Networking professionals to engage with experts and learn about the latest virtualization technologies, tips, and trends in the industry.

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A focus on Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV)

With the potential to bring much needed operational agility, service differentiation and cost efficiencies to telecoms services, NFV is fast becoming the key topic among Communication Service Provider (CSP) strategists and network architects.

Many believe that early adopters of NFV will transition from a short period of learning into accelerated deployments of new and innovative services. Late adopters run the risk of market erosion through lack of competitiveness and differentiation. Continue reading

Don’t deploy NFV as ‘New Legacy’

With many predicting 2017 as the year in which telco service cost per bit will exceed achievable revenues, operators must act quickly and effectively if they are to avoid large parts of their revenue streams becoming non-profitable.

With this in mind, Network Functions Virtualization (NFV)) has captured the imagination of the telecommunications industry. According to iHS (formally Infonetics), 35% of Communications Service Providers (CSPs) are planning to deploy NFV in 2015. Will they all succeed? I suspect not.

The fact is, there are many ways in which NFV could simply perpetuate the status quo. In deploying NFV CSPs may be deploying a ‘new legacy’. That is, creating software-defined silos where previously there were hardware-defined silos. These software silos can be just as inflexible, just as expensive and just as locked-in as their physical counterparts. Continue reading