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Tag Archives: mano

Industry’s first Open VNF Onboarding Hackathon a great success!

MWC 2017 was the venue chosen by VMware, Intel and Cloudify to kick off a co-innovation project to address one of the biggest challenges to the rapid deployment of NFV-based services: VNF onboarding. Continue reading

Meet VMware NFV Experts at Light Reading’s “OSS in the Era of SDN and NFV” Event.

On November 3rd in London VMware colleagues and myself will be joining industry leaders at this Light Reading event. We will be discussing the impact of virtualization on higher-order Operational Support Systems (OSS), and considering whether this is ‘evolution or revolution’.

Across the globe many operators already rely on VMware infrastructure for their OSS (and internal IT) services. Whether through the deployment of OSS applications on a VMware vSphere environment, or through embedded VMware technology in third party OSS products from leading network equipment providers (NEPs).

NFV and SDN are all about creating a software-defined virtualized service delivery platform. OSS systems largely run on virtualised environments today. So on the face of it, bringing together a virtualized OSS environments and a virtualized service delivery platform should be straight forward – shouldn’t it? Continue reading

Don’t deploy NFV as ‘New Legacy’

With many predicting 2017 as the year in which telco service cost per bit will exceed achievable revenues, operators must act quickly and effectively if they are to avoid large parts of their revenue streams becoming non-profitable.

With this in mind, Network Functions Virtualization (NFV)) has captured the imagination of the telecommunications industry. According to iHS (formally Infonetics), 35% of Communications Service Providers (CSPs) are planning to deploy NFV in 2015. Will they all succeed? I suspect not.

The fact is, there are many ways in which NFV could simply perpetuate the status quo. In deploying NFV CSPs may be deploying a ‘new legacy’. That is, creating software-defined silos where previously there were hardware-defined silos. These software silos can be just as inflexible, just as expensive and just as locked-in as their physical counterparts. Continue reading