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Tag Archives: virtualization

EMC VMAX3, XtremIO and VMware Solutions: Helping Solve IT’s Biggest Challenges

By Loretta Brown, vice president, OEM Alliances, VMware

The mobile cloud era (cloud, mobile, social, big data) is driving structural change across many industries. Organizations that are able to take advantage of this by delivering workloads to any device, across any cloud, on demand and securely, can gain a competitive advantage. In order to accomplish this, IT must build a hybrid cloud solution based on a software-defined datacenter.

The tectonic shifts in IT pose many great challenges for organizations, and at VMware we are proud to continue to collaborate closely with our partners, like EMC, to help solve some of the industry’s biggest IT challenges.

With today’s announcements from EMC on its Next Gen VMAX3 and XtremIO solutions, VMware continues its strong partnership with EMC as customers continue to accelerate and realize the benefits of the software-defined enterprise.

    VMAX, XtremIO and VMware solutions

Today, EMC revealed a new VMAX solution, VMAX3, which is a hyper-consolidated solution that provides predictable service levels for up to tens of thousands of virtualized workloads, including file or block, and provides high levels of availability with seamless cloud access.
VMAX3 includes enhanced management support with vSphere and acceleration with VMware VAAI.

More information on the new VMAX3 can be found here.

Additionally, EMC also announced new XtremIO solutions, which help organizations realize powerful performance and agility in their software-defined data centers. VMware Horizon 6 and XtremIO solutions meet at this intersection of VDI and storage — empowering a dynamic end-user experience at scale with radically simple central management across desktop, BYO and applications for IT, with low TCO.

When customers have specialized virtualized workloads in block environments, which require low latency and inline data reduction services, such as VDI, and mission critical applications and databases, XtremIO and VMware Horizon is a powerful solution. Thousands of desktops can be deployed in minutes for all kinds of users across desktop, BYOD and enterprise applications soar with incredibly fast, low-latency performance – all without compromising security or risking data loss.

Together, the combination of EMC’s new solutions with VMware infrastructure helps customers keep on top of today’s workloads and get ahead with tomorrow’s applications.

We congratulate EMC on its significant portfolio launch today, and look forward to continuing to partner as we help solve IT’s biggest challenges.

VMworld 2014 is quickly approaching, and you can learn more about how EMC and VMware are working together at many of the sessions available at the event. The VMworld session scheduler is live at the following link – here you can search for sessions where you can learn more about joint solutions with EMC. We look forward to seeing you in San Francisco, Aug. 24-28.

Now Available: VMware vSphere with Operations Management

By: Michael Adams, Group Product Line Marketing Manager, Cloud Infrastructure

Today, we are pleased to announce the general availability of VMware vSphere with Operations Management (read the February 12, 2013 press release).

Customers have achieved tremendous cost savings and IT agility by virtualizing their server hardware. To help them better monitor and manage VMware vSphere and business critical applications running in virtualized environments, VMware vSphere with Operations Management combines VMware vCenter Operations Management Suite Standard Edition with every VMware vSphere edition in a convenient, single SKU.

VMware vSphere with Operations Management is a new VMware vSphere product line that helps customers make the most of their investment in VMware vSphere by delivering deep insights into health to pro-actively avoid bottlenecks for improved platform and application availability and performance. Additionally, VMware vSphere with Operations Management enables customers to optimize their virtual environments and make the most efficient use of resources through integrated capacity planning.

Customers that rely on both VMware vSphere and the VMware vCenter Operations Management Suite have detailed substantial improvements in key performance metrics as well as operational and business benefits, including:

  • Reduced Capex costs by up to 30 percent;
  • Optimized capacity, improving utilization by up to 40 percent and consolidation ratios by 37 percent;
  • Improved application availability and performance, cutting downtime by more than a third and reducing the time it takes to find and resolve problems by up to 26 percent; and,
  • Nearly double the operational savings they receive from VMware vSphere alone.

VMware vSphere with Operations Management is available with a simple and scalable per processor licensing model – with no core, vRAM or number of virtual machine limits – so customers can deploy more virtual machines and further optimize their resource utilization without having to worry about added costs.

To learn more about VMware vSphere with Operations Management:

 

Three types of applications that are best suited for the Private Cloud

I had an experience recently that helped me understand how
companies should think about deploying Private Clouds in their organizations.

I went to my local bank branch to deposit a check I had
received.  As I was about to enter the teller
line, a bank employee asked me if I had used their new ATM station that
supported automated check deposits.  She walked
me outside and trained me on how I could make my deposit without having to talk
to a bank teller.

How brilliant was that! 
The bank had come up with a cost-effective way to service my request through
standardization and automation!  But to
do this, they must have identified which types of requests could be serviced
through the ATM and which ones would still be best served by the teller.

One of the questions we at VMware get a lot is, “If I want
to take advantage of the rapid provisioning and self-service capabilities of a
Private Cloud, what types of applications would benefit most from this model?”

We’ve found from the customers we’ve talked to that 3 types
of applications tend to be the best suited for the Private Cloud:

  • Transient apps – applications that will be
    rapidly cloned or re-allocated, like stage or pre-production environment, are great candidates for automation since there’s very little configuration differences between environments.
  • Elastic apps – applications where the resource demand will vary greatly over time, like with scientific computation, are also good choices since resource capacity can be extended very easily
  • The “Long Tail” of apps – applications that never get prioritized by IT, like a customized web farm for an extranet, are also a great fit since a Private Cloud may
    finally allow these applications to be provisioned at a cost that justifies
    their relatively smaller value.

Of course, there’s no reason to lose focus on virtualizing
all of your business-critical applications to get the benefits of higher
utilization and lower cost.

But as IT thinks about shifting specific workloads to the
Private Cloud to reduce costs and improve service, much like my bank shifted my
request to the ATM, these types of applications are a perfect place to start.  If your organization has applications that
are transient, elastic, or considered “long tail,” I’d recommend accelerating
your virtualization efforts with these apps and starting a dialogue with users
about moving to a self-service Private Cloud model.  In future posts, I’ll talk more specifically about
how customers have actually gone about evolving virtualized architecture into
Private Clouds and what types of learning and practice they gained in the
process.

Cloud computing: it’s an approach, not a destination

Hi, my name Murthy Mathiprakasam. I joined VMware last week as a product marketing manager.

The first few weeks at any job are a blur of ramping up, learning the lingo, and generally drinking from the fire hose.  At VMware, this is all in hyperdrive.  Not only is there a lot of exciting stuff going on over here, there are also a dizzying amount of tech terms and acronyms.  Through it all, one word has come up in almost every meeting and conversation I’ve had: Cloud.  

Now, I have to admit, I’ve always found the term and the buzz around it kind of confusing.  It seems like everyone has their own definition of Cloud, and every technology company has a Cloud angle.  Isn’t VMware all about virtualization?

So, I set out to understand VMware’s definition of Cloud, and the first thing my new boss said was:   “It’s an approach, not a destination.”

He expanded on this, offering the following perspective:  Cloud Computing is an approach to computing that leverages the efficient pooling of on-demand, self-managed virtual infrastructure, consumed as a service.

And then, it all came together for me.   

We live in a world of getting “exactly what I want, exactly how I want it, exactly when I want it.”  People buy shoes, apps, car insurance whenever they want.  They buy music and movies however they want (a single song, a 2 day “rental,” a custom channel).  In all these cases, it doesn’t matter where the product is coming from – only that we get what we want, when we need it.

This is the promise of cloud computing, bringing the “what I want, how I want, and went I want it” to the business.

And here is where I began to understand VMware’s vision.  There is no quick answer for “going to The Cloud.”  The approach is for IT departments to take an evolutionary path from virtualizing their data centers to developing a Private Cloud architecture that can be bridged with external Public Cloud resources to get the full flexibility of a Hybrid Cloud.  For IT departments to go down this evolutionary path, they are going to have to change the way they work. 

This is Cloud Computing.

It will take me a few more weeks to understand some of the concepts, the changes, and the technologies that will make all of this possible.  I do understand that virtualization is central to this approach. Some of the words I’m picking up are agility, self-service, security, policy-driven… but even if I don’t understand the details, I understand the potential.  Today’s datacenter isn’t built to deliver “what, how, when.”  At VMware, we are helping customers transform the way IT operates  – transform the datacenter  – in order to better serve the line of business (and us business consumers) in a way that is streamlined, responsive, and cost-effective.  

I’m looking forward to learning more about this approach and hope you are too.