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Tag Archives: benchmarking

Introducing TPCx-HS Version 2 – An Industry Standard Benchmark for Apache Spark and Hadoop clusters deployed on premise or in the cloud

Since its release on August 2014, the TPCx-HS Hadoop benchmark has helped drive competition in the Big Data marketplace, generating 23 publications spanning 5 Hadoop distributions, 3 hardware vendors, 2 OS distributions and 1 virtualization platform. By all measures, it has proven to be a successful industry standard benchmark for Hadoop systems. However, the Big Data landscape has rapidly changed over the last 30 months. Key technologies have matured while new ones have risen to prominence in an effort to keep pace with the exponential expansion of datasets. One such technology is Apache Spark.

spark-logo-trademarkAccording to a Big Data survey published by the Taneja Group, more than half of the respondents reported actively using Spark, with a notable increase in usage over the 12 months following the survey. Clearly, Spark is an important component of any Big Data pipeline today. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, there is also a significant trend towards deploying Spark in the cloud. What is driving this adoption of Spark? Predominantly, performance.

Today, with the widespread adoption of Spark and its integration into many commercial Big Data platform offerings, I believe there needs to be a straightforward, industry standard way in which Spark performance and price/performance could be objectively measured and verified. Just like TPCx-HS Version 1 for Hadoop, the workload needs to be well understood and the metrics easily relatable to the end user.

Continuing on the Transaction Processing Performance Council’s commitment to bringing relevant benchmarks to the industry, it is my pleasure to announce TPCx-HS Version 2 for Spark and Hadoop. In keeping with important industry trends, not only does TPCx-HS support traditional on premise deployments, but also cloud.

I envision that TPCx-HS will continue to be a useful benchmark standard for customers as they evaluate Big Data deployments in terms of performance and price/performance, and for vendors in demonstrating the competitiveness of their products.

 

Tariq Magdon-Ismail

(Chair, TPCx-HS Benchmark Committee)

 

Additional Information:  TPC Press Release

Oracle Database Performance on vSphere 6.5 Monster Virtual Machines

We have just published a new whitepaper on the performance of Oracle databases on vSphere 6.5 monster virtual machines. We took a look at the performance of the largest virtual machines possible on the previous four generations of four-socket Intel-based servers. The results show how performance of these large virtual machines continues to scale with the increases and improvements in server hardware.

Oracle Database Monster VM Performance across 4 generations of Intel based servers on vSphere 6.5

Oracle Database Monster VM Performance on vSphere 6.5 across 4 generations of Intel-based  four-socket servers

In addition to vSphere 6.5 and the four-socket Intel-based servers used in the testing, an IBM FlashSystem A9000 high performance all flash array was used. This array provided extreme low latency performance that enabled the database virtual machines to perform at the achieved high levels of performance.

Please read the full paper, Oracle Monster Virtual Machine Performance on VMware vSphere 6.5, for details on hardware, software, test setup, results, and more cool graphs.  The paper also covers performance gain from Hyper-Threading, performance effect of NUMA, and best practices for Oracle monster virtual machines. These best practices are focused on monster virtual machines, and it is recommended to also check out the full Oracle Databases on VMware Best Practices Guide.

Some similar tests with Microsoft SQL Server monster virtual machines were also recently completed on vSphere 6.5 by my colleague David Morse. Please see his blog post  and whitepaper for the full details.

This work on Oracle is in some ways a follow up to Project Capstone from 2015 and the resulting whitepaper Peeking at the Future with Giant Monster Virtual Machines . That project dealt with monster VM performance from a slightly different angle and might be interesting to those who are also interested in this paper and its results.

 

Capturing the Flag for Cloud IaaS Performance with VMware’s vSphere 6.5 and VIO 3.1 on Dell PowerEdge Servers

This week SPEC has published a new SPEC CloudTM IaaS 2016 result for a private cloud configuration built using VMware vSphere 6.5 and VMware Integrated OpenStack 3.1 (VIO 3.1) and Dell PowerEdge Servers. Working with VMware, Dell has pushed their lead in cloud performance even further. This time, the primary metric produced was a Scalability score of 78.5 @ 72 Application Instances (468 VMs). The Elasticity score was 87.4%.

VMware and Dell are active participants in SPEC and have contributed to the development of its industry standard benchmarks including SPEC Cloud IaaS 2016. Both organizations strongly support SPEC’s mission to provide a set of fair and realistic metrics on which to differentiate modern systems and technologies.

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Weathervane, a benchmarking tool for virtualized infrastructure and the cloud, is now open source.

Weathervane is a performance benchmarking tool developed at VMware.  It lets you assess the performance of your virtualized or cloud environment by driving a load against a realistic application and capturing relevant performance metrics.  You might use it to compare the performance characteristics of two different environments, or to understand the performance impact of some change in an existing environment.

Weathervane is very flexible, allowing you to configure almost every aspect of a test, and yet is easy to use thanks to tools that help prepare your test environment and a powerful run harness that automates almost every aspect of your performance tests.  You can typically go from a fresh start to running performance tests with a large multi-tier application in a single day.

Weathervane supports a number of advanced capabilities, such as deploying multiple independent application instances, deploying application services in containers, driving variable loads, and allowing run-time configuration changes for measuring elasticity-related performance metrics.

Weathervane has been used extensively within VMware, and is now open source and available on GitHub at https://github.com/vmware/weathervane.

The rest of this blog gives an overview of the primary features of Weathervane.

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vCenter 6.5 Performance: what does 6x mean?

At the VMworld 2016 Barcelona keynote, CTO Ray O’Farrell proudly presented the performance improvements in vCenter 6.5. He showed the following slide:

6x_slide

Slide from Ray O’Farrell’s keynote at VMworld 2016 Barcelona, showing 2x improvement in scale from 6.0 to 6.5 and 6x improvement in throughput from 5.5 to 6.5.

As a senior performance engineer who focuses on vCenter, and as one of the presenters of VMworld Session INF8108 (listed in the top-right corner of the slide above), I have received a number of questions regarding the “6x” and “2x scale” labels in the slide above. This blog is an attempt to explain these numbers by describing (at a high level) the performance improvements for vCenter in 6.5. I will focus specifically on the vCenter Appliance in this post.

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SQL Server VM Performance with VMware vSphere 6.5

Achieving optimal SQL Server performance on vSphere has been a constant focus here at VMware; I’ve published past performance studies with vSphere 5.5 and 6.0 which showed excellent performance up to the maximum VM size supported at the time.

Since then, there have been quite a few changes!  While this study uses a similar test methodology, it features an updated hypervisor (vSphere 6.5), database engine (SQL Server 2016), OLTP benchmark (DVD Store 3), and CPUs (Intel Xeon v4 processors with 24 cores per socket, codenamed Broadwell-EX).

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How to correctly test the performance of Virtual SAN 6.2 deduplication feature

In VMware Virtual SAN 6.2, we introduced several features highly requested by customers, such as deduplication and compression. An overview of this feature can be found in the blog: Virtual SAN 6.2 – Deduplication And Compression Deep Dive.

The deduplication feature adds the most benefit to an all-flash Virtual SAN environment because, while SSDs are more expensive than spinning disks, the cost is amortized because more workloads can fit on the smaller SSDs. Therefore, our performance testing is performed on an all-flash Virtual SAN cluster with deduplication enabled.

When testing the performance of the deduplication feature for Virtual SAN, we observed the following:

  • Unexpected deduplication ratio
  • High device read latency in the capacity tier, even though the SSD is perfectly fine

In this blog, we discuss the reason behind these two issues and share our testing experience.

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Virtual SAN 6.2 Performance with OLTP and VDI Workloads

Virtual SAN is a VMware storage solution that is tightly integrated with vSphere—making storage setup and maintenance in a vSphere virtualized environment fast and flexible. Virtual SAN 6.2 adds several features and improvements, including additional data integrity with software checksum, space efficiency features of RAID-5 and RAID-6, deduplication and compression, and an in-memory client read cache.

We ran several tests to compare the performance of Virtual SAN 6.1 and 6.2 to make sure they were on par with each other.

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Fault Tolerance Performance in vSphere 6

VMware has published a technical white paper about vSphere 6 Fault Tolerance architecture and performance. The paper describes which types of applications work best in virtual machines with vSphere FT enabled.

VMware vSphere Fault Tolerance (FT) provides continuous availability to virtual machines that require a high amount of uptime. If the virtual machine fails, another virtual machine is ready to take over the job.  vSphere achieves FT by maintaining primary and secondary virtual machines using a new technology named Fast Checkpointing. This technology is similar to Storage vMotion, which copies the virtual machine state (storage, memory, and networking) to the secondary ESXi host. Fast Checkpointing keeps the primary and secondary virtual machines in sync.

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Virtualizing Performance-Critical Database Applications in VMware vSphere 6.0

by Priti Mishra

Performance studies have previously shown that there is no doubt virtualized servers can run a variety of applications near, or in some cases even above, that of software running natively (on bare metal). In a new white paper, we raise the bar higher and test “monster” vSphere virtual machines loaded with CPU and running the most taxing databases and transaction processing applications.

The benchmark workload, which we call Order-Entry, is based on an industry-standard online transaction processing (OLTP) benchmark called TPC-C. Both rigorous and demanding, the Order-Entry workload pushes virtual machine performance.

Note: The Order Entry benchmark is derived from the TPC-C workload, but is not compliant with the TPC-C specification, and its results are not comparable to TPC-C results.

The white paper quantifies the:

  • Performance differential between ESXi 6.0 and native
  • Performance differential between ESXi 6.0 and ESXi 5.1
  • Performance gains due to enhancements built into ESXi 6.0

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