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Monthly Archives: December 2015

Virtualizing Performance-Critical Database Applications in VMware vSphere 6.0

by Priti Mishra

Performance studies have previously shown that there is no doubt virtualized servers can run a variety of applications near, or in some cases even above, that of software running natively (on bare metal). In a new white paper, we raise the bar higher and test “monster” vSphere virtual machines loaded with CPU and running the most taxing databases and transaction processing applications.

The benchmark workload, which we call Order-Entry, is based on an industry-standard online transaction processing (OLTP) benchmark called TPC-C. Both rigorous and demanding, the Order-Entry workload pushes virtual machine performance.

Note: The Order Entry benchmark is derived from the TPC-C workload, but is not compliant with the TPC-C specification, and its results are not comparable to TPC-C results.

The white paper quantifies the:

  • Performance differential between ESXi 6.0 and native
  • Performance differential between ESXi 6.0 and ESXi 5.1
  • Performance gains due to enhancements built into ESXi 6.0

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VMware vCloud Air Database Performance Scalability with SQL Server

Previous posts have shown vSphere can easily handle running Microsoft SQL Server on four-socket servers with large numbers of cores—with vSphere 5.5 on Westmere-EX and more recently with vSphere 6 on Ivy Bridge-EX.  We recently ran similar tests on vCloud Air to measure how these enterprise databases with mission critical performance requirements perform in a cloud environment. The tests show that SQL Server databases scale very well on vCloud Air with a variety of virtual machine (VM) counts and virtual CPU (vCPU) sizes.

The benchmark tests were run with vCloud Air using their Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) subscription-based service.  This is a very compelling hybrid cloud service that allows for an on-premises vSphere infrastructure to be expanded into the public cloud in a secure and scalable way. The underlying host hardware consisted of two 8-core CPUs for a total of 16 physical cores, which meant that the maximum number of vCPUs was 16 (although additional processors were available via Hyper-Threading, they were not utilized).

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