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Tag Archives: VMware vSphere

OpenStack Boston Summit VMware Sessions Recap

Watch below to experience VMware’s Speaker Sessions at this year’s OpenStack Summit in Boston!


OpenStack & VMware Getting the Best of Both

Speaker: Andrew Pearce

Come and understand the true value to your organization of combining Openstack and VMware. In this session you will understand the value of having a defcore / Openstack powered solution to enable your developers to provision IaaS, in a way that they want, using the tools that they want. In addition you will be able to enable your operations team to continue to utilize the tools, resources and methodology that they use to ensure that your organization has a production grade environment to support your developers.Deploying Openstack, and getting the advantages of Openstack does not need to be a rip and replace strategy. See how other customers have had their cake and eat it.


OpenStack and VMware: Enterprise-Grade IaaS Built on Proven Foundation

Speakers: Xiao Hu Gao & Hari Kannan 

Running production workloads on OpenStack requires a rock solid IaaS running on a trusted infrastructure platform. Think about upgrading, patching, managing the environment, high availability, disaster recovery, security and the list goes on. VMware delivers a top-notch OpenStack distribution that allows you all of the above and much more. Come to this session to see (with a demo) how you can easily and quickly deploy OpenStack for your dev test as well as production workloads.


Is Neutron Challenging to You? Learn How VMware NSX is the Solution for Regular OpenStack Network & Security Services and Kubernetes

Speakers: Dmitri Desmidt, Yves Fauser

Neutron is challenging in many aspects. The main ones reported by OpenStack admins are: complex implementation of network and security services, high-availability, management/operation/troubleshooting, scale. Additionally, with new Kubernetes and Containers deployments, security between containers and management of container traffic is a new headache. VMware NSX offers a plugin for all Neutron OpenStack installations for ESXi and KVM hypervisors. Learn in this session with multiple live demos how VMware NSX plugin resolves all the Neutron challenges in an easy way.


 Digital Transformation with OpenStack for Modern Service Providers

Speakers: Misbah Mahmoodi, Kenny Lee

The pace of technological change is accelerating at an exponential rate. With the advent of 5G networks and IoT, Communications Service Providers success depends not only on their ability to adapt to changes quickly but to do so faster than competitors. Speed is the of the essence in developing new services, deploying them to subscribers, delivering a superior Quality of Experience, and increasing operational efficiency with lowered cost structures. For CSPs to adapt and remain competitive, they are faced with important questions as they explore the digital transformatVMwareion of their business and infrastructure, and how they can leverage NFV, and OpenStack and open hardware platforms to accelerate change and modernization.


Running Kubernates on a Thin OpenStack

Speakers: Mayan Weiss & Hari Kannan 

Kubernetes is leading the container mindshare and OpenStack community has built integrations to support it. However, running production workloads on Kubernetes is still a challenge. What if there was a production ready, multi-tenant K8s distro? Dream no more. Come to this session to see how we adapted OpenStack + K8s to provide container networking, persistent storage, RBAC, LBaaS and more on VMware SDDC.


OpenStack and OVN: What’s New with OVS 2.7

Speakers: Russel Bryant, Ben Pfaff, Justin Pettit

OVN is a virtual networking project built by the Open vSwitch community.
OpenStack can make use of OVN as its backend networking implementation
for Neutron. OVN and its Neutron integration are ready for use in OpenStack
deployments.

This talk will cover the latest developments in the OVN project and the
latest release, part of OVS 2.7. Enhancements include better performance,
improved debugging capabilities, and more flexible L3 gateways. 
We will take a look ahead the next set of things we expect to work on for
OVN, which includes logging for OVN ACLs (security groups), encrypted
tunnels, native DNS integration, and more.

We will also cover some of the performance comparison results of OVN
as compared with the original OVS support in Neutron (ML2/OVS). Finally, 
we will discuss how to deploy OpenStack with OVN or migrate an existing
deployment from ML2/OVS to OVN.


DefCore to Interop and Back Again: OpenStack Programs and Certifications Explained

Speakers: Mark Voelker & Egle Sigler

Openstack Interop (formerly DefCore) guidelines have been in place for 2 years now, and anyone wanting to use OpenStack logo must pass these guidelines. How are guidelines created and updated? How would your favorite project be added to it? How can you guarantee that your OpenStack deployment will comply with the new guidelines? In this session we will cover OpenStack Interop guidelines and components, as well as explain how they are created and updated.


Senlin: An ideal Bridge Between NFV Orchestrator and OpenStack

Speakers: Xinhui Li, Ethan Lynn, Yanyan Hu

Resource Management is a top requirement in NFV field. Usually, the Orchestrator take the responsibility of parsing a virtual network function into different virtual units (VDU) to deploy and operate over Cloud. Senlin, positioned as clustering resource manager since the born time, can be the ideal bridge between NFV orchestrator with OpenStack: it uses a consolidate model which is directly mapped to a VDU to interact with different backend services like Nova, Neutron, Cinder for compute, network and storage resources per Orchestrator’s demand; it provides rich operational functions like auto-scaling, load-balancing and auto healing. We use a popular VIMS typed VNF to illustrate how to easily deploy a VNF on OpenStack and manage it in a scalable and flexible way.


High Availability and Scalability Management of VNF

Speakers: Haiwei Xu, Xinhui Li, XueFeng Liu

Now network function virtualization (NFV) is growing rapidly and widely adopted by many telcom enterprises. In openstack Tacker takes the responsibility of building a Generic VNF Manager (VNFM) and a NFV Orchestrator (NFVO) to deploy and operate Network Services and Virtual Network Functions (VNFs) on the infrastructure platform. For the VNFs which can work as a loadbalancer or a firewall, Tacker needs to consider the availability of each VNF to ensure they are not overloaded or out of work. To prevent VNFs from being overloaded or down, Tacker need to make VNFs HA and auto-scaling. So in fact the VNFs of certain function should not be a single node, but a cluster.

That comes out a problem of cluster managing. In OpenStack environment there is a Clustering service called Senlin which provides scalability management and HA functions for the nodes, those features are exactly fit for Tacker’s requirement.

In this talk we will give you a general introduction of this feature.


How an Interop Capability Becomes Part of the OpenStack Interop Guidelines

Speakers: Rochelle Grober, Mark Voelker, Luz Cazares

OpenStack Interop Working Group (formerly DefCore) produces the OpenStack Powered (TM) Guidelines (a.k.a. Interoperability Guidelines). But, how do we decide what goes into the guideline? How do we define these so called “Capabilities”? And how does the team “score” them? Attend this session to learn what we mean by “Capability”, the requirements a capability must meet, the process the group follows to grade those capabilities… And, you know what, lets score your favorite thing live.


OpenStack Interoperability Challenge and Interoperability Workgroup Updates: The Adventure Continues

Speakers: Brad Topol, Mark Voelker, Tong Li

The OpenStack community has been driving initiatives on two sides of the interoperability coin: workload portability and API/code standards for OpenStack Powered products. The first phase of the OpenStack Interoperability Challenge culminated with a Barcelona Summit Keynote demo comprised of 16 vendors all running the same enterprise workload to illustrate that OpenStack enables workload portability across OpenStack clouds. Building on this momentum for its second phase, the multi-vendor Interop Challenge team has selected new advanced workloads based on Kubernetes and NFV applications to flush out portability issues in these commonly deployed workloads. Meanwhile, the recently formed Interop Working Group continues to roll out new Guidelines, drive new initiatives, and is considering expanding its scope to cover more vertical use cases. In this presentation, we describe the progress, challenges, and lessons learned from both of these efforts.

How To Efficiently Derive Value From VMware Integrated OpenStack

One of our recent posts on this blog covered how VMware Integrated Openstack (VIO) can be deployed in less than 15 minutes thanks to an easy and friendly wizard-driven deployment.

That post has also mentioned that recent updates have been added to VIO that focus on its ease of use and consumption, including the integration with your existing vSphere environment.

 

This article will explore in greater detail the latter topic and will focus on two features that are designed to help customers start deriving value from VIO quickly.


vSphere Templates as OpenStack Images

 

An OpenStack cloud without any image is like a physical server without an operating system – not so useful!

 

One of the first elements you want to seed your cloud with is images so users/developers can start building applications. In a private cloud environment, cloud admins will want to expose a list of standard OS (Operating System, not OpenStack…) images to be used to that end, in other words OS master images.

 

When VIO is deployed on top of an existing vSphere environment, these OS master images are generally already present in the virtualization layer as vSphere templates and a great deal of engineering hours have gone into creating and configuring those images to reflect the very own needs of a given corporate organization in terms of security, compliance or regulatory requirements – OS hardening, customization, agents installation, etc…

 

What if you were able to reuse those vSphere templates and turn them into OpenStack images and hence preserve all of your master OS configurations across all of your cloud deployments?

VIO supports this capability out of the box (see diagram below) and enables users to leverage their existing vSphere templates by adding them to their OpenStack deployment as Glance images, which can then be booted as OpenStack instances or used to create bootable Cinder volumes.

 

The beauty of this feature is that it is done without copying the template into the Glance data-store. The media only exists in one place (the original data-store where the template is stored) and we will actually create a “pointer” from the OpenStack image object towards the vSphere template thus saving us from the tedious and possibly lengthy process of copying media from one location to another (OS images tend to be pretty large in corporate environments).

 

This feature is available through the glance CLI only and here are the high-level steps that need to be performed to create an image:

– First: create an OpenStack image

– Second: note that image ID and specify a location pointing towards the vSphere template

– Third: in the images section of the Horizon dashboard for example, a new image will show up called “corporate-windows-2012-r2” from which instances can be launched.

Note: cloud admins will have to make sure those OS images have the cloud-init package installed on them before they can be fully used in the OpenStack environment. If cloud-init needs to be installed, this can be done either pre- or post- the import process into Glance.

Run the video below for a detailed tutorial on the configuration steps, including CLI commands:

Finally, here’s the section in the official configuration guide: http://tinyurl.com/hx4z4jt


Importing vSphere VMs into OpenStack

 

A frequent request from customers deploying VIO on their existing vSphere implementation is “Can I import my existing VMs into my OpenStack environment?”

 

The business rationale for this request is that IT wants to be consistent and offer a similar level of service and user experience to both the new applications deployed through the OpenStack framework as well as the existing workloads currently running under a vSphere management plane “only”. They basically want users in charge of existing applications to enjoy capabilities such as self-service, lifecycle management, automation, etc…and hence avoid creating a two-tier IT offering.

 

VIO supports this capability by allowing users to quickly import vSphere VMs into VIO and start managing them as instances through standard OpenStack APIs. This feature is also available through CLI only and leverages the newly released VMware DCLI toolset.

 

Here are the high-level steps for importing an existing VM under OpenStack:

– First, list the “Unmanaged” VMs in vCenter (ie unmanaged by VIO)

– Import one of those VMs into a specific project/tenant in OpenStack

– The system will then generate a UUID for the newly created instance and the instance will show up in Horizon where it can be managed like any other running one.

 

 

We hope you enjoyed reading this article and that those features will make you want to go ahead and discover VIO!

If you’re ready to deploy OpenStack today, download it now and get started, or dare your IT team to try our VMware Integrated OpenStack Hands-On-Lab, no installation required.


This article was written by Hassan Hamade a Cloud Solution Architect at VMware in the EMEA SDDC technology practice team. 

Apples To Oranges: Why vSphere & VIO are Best Bests for OpenStack Adoption

OpenStack doesn’t mandate defaults for compute, network and storage, which frees you to select the best technology. For many VMware customers, the best choice will be vSphere to provide OpenStack Nova compute capabilities.

 

It is commonly asserted that KVM is the only hypervisor to use in an OpenStack deployment. Yet every significant commercial OpenStack distro supports vSphere. The reasons for this broad support are clear.

Costs for commercial KVM are comparable to vSphere. In addition, vSphere has tremendous added benefits: widely available and knowledgeable staff, vastly simplified operations, and proven lifecycle management that can keep up with OpenStack’s rapid release cadence.

 

Let’s talk first about cost. Traditional, commercial KVM has a yearly recurring support subscription price. Red Hat OpenStack Platform-Standard 2 sockets can be found online at $11,611/year making the 3 year cost around $34,833[i]. VMware vSphere with Operations Management Enterprise Plus (multiplied by 2 to match Red Hat’s socket pair pricing) for 3 years, plus the $200/CPU/year VMware Integrated OpenStack SnS is $14,863[ii]. Even when a customer uses vCloud Suite Advanced, costs are on par with Red Hat. (Red Hat has often compared prices using VMware’s vCloud Suite Enterprise license to exaggerate cost differences.)

 

 

When 451 Research[iii] compared distro costs based on a “basket” of total costs in 2015 they found that commercial distros had a cost that was close to regular virtualization. And if VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) is the point of comparison, the costs would likely be even closer. The net-net is that cost turns out not to be a significant differentiator when it comes to commercial KVM compared with vSphere. This brings us to the significant technical and operational benefits vSphere brings to an OpenStack deployment.

 

In the beginning, it was assumed that OpenStack apps would build in the resiliency that used to be assumed from a vSphere environment, thus allowing vSphere to be removed. As the OpenStack project has matured, capabilities such as VMware vMotion and DRS (Distributed Resource Scheduler) have risen in importance to end users. Regardless of the application the stability and reliability of the underlying infrastructure matters.

 

There are two sets of reasons to adopt OpenStack on vSphere.

 

First, you can use VIO to quickly (minutes or hours instead of days or weeks) build a production-grade, operational OpenStack environment with the IT staff you already have, leveraging the battle-tested infrastructure your staff already knows and relies on. No other distro uses a rigorously tested combination of best-in-class compute (vSphere Ent+ for Nova), network (NSX for Neutron), and storage (VSAN for Cinder).

 

Second, only VMware, a long-time (since 2012), active (consistently a top 10 code contributor) OpenStack community member provides BOTH the best underlying infrastructure components AND the ongoing automation and operational tools needed to successfully manage OpenStack in production.

 

In many cases, it all adds up to vSphere being the best choice for production OpenStack.

 


[i] http://www.kernelsoftware.com/products/catalog/red_hat.html
[ii] http://store.vmware.com/store/vmware/en_US/cat/ThemeID.2485600/categoryID.66071400
[iii] https://451research.com/images/Marketing/press_releases/CPI_PR_05.01.15_FINAL.pdf


This Article was written by Cameron Sturdevant,  Product Line Manager at VMware

OpenStack Summit 2016 Re-Cap – Speeding Up Developer Productivity with OpenStack and Open Source Tools

Some developers may avoid utilizing an OpenStack cloud, despite the advantages they stand to gain, because they have already established automation workflows using popular open source tools with public cloud providers.

But in a joint presentation to the 2016 OpenStack Summit, VMware Senior Technical Marketing Manager Trevor Roberts Jr.’s and VMware NSX Engineering Architect Scott Lowe explain how developers can take advantage of OpenStack clouds using the same open source tools that they already know.

Their talk runs through a configuration sequence, including image management, dev/test, and production deployment, showing how standard open source tools that developers already use for non-OpenStack deployments can run in exactly the same way with an OpenStack cloud. In this case, they discuss using Packer for image building, Vagrant and Docker Machine for software development and testing, and Terraform for production grade deployments.

“This is a way of using an existing tool that you’re already comfortable and familiar with to start consuming your OpenStack cloud,” says Roberts, before demoing an OpenStack customized image build with Packer and then using that image to create and deploy an OpenStack-provisioned instance with Vagrant.

 

Lowe next profiles Docker Machine, which provisions instances of the Docker Engine for testing, and shows how you can use Docker Machine to spin up instances of Docker inside an OpenStack cloud.

Lastly, Lowe demos Terraform, which offers an infrastructure-as-a-service/cloud services approach to production deployments on multiple platforms (it’s similar to Heat for OpenStack), creating an entire OpenStack infrastructure with a single click, including a new network and router, and launching multiple new instances with floating IP addresses for each, ready for pulling down containers as required.

 

“It’s very simple to use these development tools with OpenStack,” adds Roberts. “It’s just a matter of making sure your developers feel comfortable with the environment and letting them know there are plugins out there – you don’t have to keep using other infrastructures.”

As Roberts notes in the presentation, VMware itself is “full in on OpenStack – we contribute to projects that aren’t even in our own distribution just to help out the community.” Meanwhile, VMware’s own OpenStack solution – VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) – offers, a DefCore-compliant OpenStack distribution specifically configured to use open source drivers to manage VMware infrastructure technologies, further aiding the adoption process for developers already familiar with vSphere, vRealize, and NSX.

 

For more information on VIO, check out the VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) product homepage, or the VIO Hands-on Lab. If you hold a current license for vSphere Enterprise Plus, vSphere Operations Management, or vSphere Standard with NSX Advanced, you can download VIO for free.

VMware Integrated OpenStack Video Series: Working with Instances

In our last installment, we discussed the simplicity of the VMware Integrated OpenStack deployment process. Today, we will discuss how VMware Integrated OpenStack users can provision virtual machines. First, we need to get familiar with some OpenStack terminology:

  • Instance – a running virtual machine in your environment. The OpenStack Nova service provides users with the ability to manage hypervisors and deploy virtual machines.
  • Image – similar in concept to a VM template. The OpenStack Glance service maintains a collection of images from which users will deploy their instances.
  • Volume – this is an additional virtual disk (VMDK) that is attached to a running instance. Volumes can be added to instances ad hoc via the OpenStack Cinder service.
  • Flavor – allocation of resources (i.e. number of vCPUs, storage, RAM).
  • Security Group – rules governing network access to your deployed instance (ex: this instance may be accessed via TCP port 22 from a certain IP range).
  • Network – the VMware vSphere port group that your instance will be attached to. Your port groups are automatically created by the OpenStack Neutron service.

OpenStack emphasizes the capability for users to manage their infrastructure programmatically through REST APIs, and this is exhibited in the multiple ways that a user can deploy an instance. The Horizon GUI provides the capability to launch instances with a point-and-click interface. The Nova CLI provides users with simple commands to deploy your instances, and these commands can be combined in shell scripts.

For users who want even more control and flexibility over instance deployment, the REST APIs can be leveraged. The important thing to note is that regardless of the interface the user selects, the REST API is utilized behind the scenes. For example, if I use the nova boot CLI command, it translates my simple inputs into an HTTP request that the Nova service will understand.

If you would like to see the API code being generated by your CLI commands, you can use the “–debug” option with CLI tools (ex: nova –debug boot…). An example HTTP Request generated by the nova boot CLI command is included below:

curl -g -i -X POST https://vio-dashboard.eng.vmware.com:8774/v2/b228bcefad9f487fb6ae4821bfb90130/servers
-H "User-Agent: python-novaclient"
-H "Content-Type: application/json"
-H "Accept: application/json"
-H "X-Auth-Token: {SHA1}c1ef2534845b985dc4c52b803e357c08daea265b"
-d '{
"server": {
"name": "apitest",
"imageRef": "0723d0ac-9a08-49f5-9160-97efe05aa6ca",
"flavorRef": "2",
"max_count": 1,
"min_count": 1,
"networks": [{"uuid": "a722cb2b-f041-40b1-ad6a-74a27d30539a"}],
"security_groups": [{"name": "default"}]
}

My instance name (“apitest”) may seem too generic, and it’s possible that another user may use the same name. Not to worry, instance names do not need to be unique: OpenStack identifies all resources, including instances, by unique identifiers. In the sample code above, my source image, flavor, and network are all identified by their unique identifiers. Well, what about vCenter?  In vCenter, my virtual machine’s name includes its OpenStack identifier:

 

VMware Integrated Openstack instance uuid in vCenter

How vCenter Displays an OpenStack Instance

As we saw in the code above, the user specifies the source image, flavor, network, and security group during instance deployment. In the background, the user’s credentials and the interactions between the various OpenStack components are authenticated by the OpenStack Identity service (Keystone). The following graphic provides an illustration of these interactions:

 

VMware Integrated OpenStack Component Interaction

OpenStack Component Interaction

Check out the following video to see instance deployment in action with the Horizon GUI and the Nova CLI, :

 

Stay tuned for next week’s blog post when we discuss working with OpenStack networks! In the meantime, you can learn more on the VMware Product Walkthrough site and on the VMware Integrated OpenStack product page.