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Tag Archives: NSX

OpenStack Summit Barcelona 2016 Session Voting Open Until August 8!

Vote for OpenStack VMworld Sessions!The OpenStack Summit session proposals are available online for attendees to vote on. You can access this site to search for VMware-related sessions and to cast your vote.

NOTE: At this time, the Summit team has disabled direct linking to sessions. If that changes, I’ll be sure to update the list below with the direct URLs.

The following list comprises the sessions and speakers who plan on speaking at the Barcelona Summit on behalf of VMware, organized by category. If one or more of the topics catch your interest, your votes would be appreciated:

Evaluating OpenStack

OpenStack for VMware Administrators
Speaker: Trevor Roberts Jr

Case Studies

Amadeus’s journey building a Software Defined Data Center with VMware VIO and NSX
Speakers: Sai Chaitanya, Arthur Knopper

Case Study of an OpenStack Deployment in China
Speaker: Gavin Lu

Architectural Decisions

The Many Personas of Interoperability: Why Operators, Vendors, End Users, & OpenStack Devs Care
Speakers: Mark Voelker

IT Strategy

Mode 1, Mode 2, Mode 1.5, Pets, Cattle: How to tame the menagerie with OpenStack
Speakers: Santhosh Sundararaman, Giridhar Jayavelu

Storage

Tesora and VMware present – A Complete Guide to Running Your Own DBaaS using OpenStack Trove
Speaker: Arvind Soni, Doug Shelley

How To & Best Practices

Skipping OpenStack Releases: (You Don’t) Gotta Catch ‘Em All
Speakers: Mark Voelker, Sidharth Surana, Karol Stepniewski

Analyzing OpenStack Performance : A case study from large scale OpenStack testing.
Speaker: Arvind Soni

Addressing Open Issues in Container Orchestration using OpenStack
Speakers: Santhosh Sundararaman, Giridhar Jayavelu

Infrastructure Updates with OpenStack on vSphere
Speaker: Trevor Roberts Jr

Project Updates

Native HTML5 consoles for VMware
Speaker: Radoslav Gerganov

Cluster Run: Resource Pool Operations Made Easy
Speakers: Xinhui Li, Qiming Teng, Mark Voelker

Upstream Development

Lessons from the Developer Cloud – OpenStack Innovation Center Success Stories
Speakers: Antonio Ojea, Arvind Soni, Justin Shepard, Travis Broughton

Networking

Next generation security and service chaining with NSX and Fortinet
Speakers: Marcos Hernandez, Elie Bitton

Tenant Networks vs. Provider Networks in the Private Cloud Context
Speaker: Marcos Hernandez

OVN – Moving into Production
Speakers: Russell Bryant, Ben Pfaff, Justin Pettit

Telecom / NFV Operations

NFV Considerations for OpenStack on VMware Infrastructure
Speakers: Giridhar Jayavelu

VMWare Integrated Openstack with Gigaspaces Cloudify Orchestration for NFV – technical deep dive
Speakers: Vanessa Little

Design Case Study – VoLTE core solution with Cloudify and Athonet on VMware Integrated Openstack
Speakers: Vanessa Little

VNF Service Modeling and Chaining on VMware Integrated OpenStack using TOSCA/YANG
Speakers: Ran Ziv

Design Case Study – IMS Core deployment with Metaswitch and Cloudify on VMware Integrated Openstack
Speakers: Vanessa Little

How to help your networking peers roll out NFV solutions and be a hero while at it.
Speaker: Jambi Ganbar, Arvind Soni

Hands-on Workshops

Hands on Lab: Operating & Upgrading OpenStack
Speakers: Santhosh Sundararaman

Developer Tools

Speeding up Developer Productivity with OpenStack and Open Source Tools
Speakers: Trevor Roberts Jr, Scott Lowe

Products & Services

VMware NSX and Mirantis OpenStack integration
Speakers: Igo Zinovik, Dimitri Desmidt, Andrian Noga

HPE Helion Openstack and VMware NSX Networking
Speakers: Gary Kotton, Ed Bak

See you in Barcelona!

OpenStack 2.5: VMware Integrated OpenStack 2.5 is GA – What’s New?

We are very excited about this newest release of VMware Integrated OpenStack, OpenStack 2.5. This release continues to advance VIO as the easiest and fastest route to build an OpenStack cloud on top of vSphere, NSX and Virtual SAN So, what’s in this release? Continue reading to learn more about the latest features in VMware Integrated OpenStack 2.5, which is available for download now.

  1. Seamlessly Leverage Existing VM Templates
  2. Smaller Management Footprint
  3. Support for vSphere Standard Edition with NSX
  4. Troubleshooting & Monitoring Out of the Box
  5. Neutron Layer 2 Gateway Support
  6. Optimized for NFV

Continue reading

VMware @ OpenStack Summit Austin 2016

OpenStack Summit Austin Logo

The OpenStack Summit is returning to the city where it began: Austin! The VMware Integrated OpenStack team will be on hand to share customer testimonials as well as information about the work we’ve done in our distribution and drivers since the Tokyo Summit.

We look forward to seeing you in Austin at the VMware booth!

Here is a list of the summit sessions where you can hear more from our customers and team members:

Monday, April 25

Tuesday, April 26

Thursday, April 28

See you at the Summit!

VMware Integrated OpenStack Video Series: Security Groups

OpenStack’s security groups capability is a key feature in its support for multi-tenant workloads. Security groups are sets of rules that users utilize to specify access to their application infrastructure. This access is specified either via a classless inter-domain routing (CIDR) network range or by specifying the name of another security group.

Let’s take a look at how security groups would be applied in a simple three-tier application infrastructure consisting of web, application, and database layers:

OpenStack Security Groups

The application developer has restricted access to the various tiers of her application as follows:

  • Users can only access the Web tier, and that access is restricted solely to TCP 443 for HTTPS
  • Only instances in the Web security group can access instances in the App security group
  • Only instances in the App security group can access instances in the DB security group

VMware Integrated OpenStack leverages VMware NSX’s own security group functionality to implement this capability for our users. The application developers are not even aware of this advantage for their application security because they are using industry-standard open source APIs to deploy their infrastructure.

The following video provides a detailed walkthrough of using OpenStack security groups.

 

Stay tuned for the next installment covering OpenStack users and projects! In the meantime, you can learn more on the VMware Product Walkthrough site and on the VMware Integrated OpenStack product page.

OpenStack Networking with VMware NSX, Part 3

Today’s blog post is the final entry in a series by Marcos Hernandez, one of the OpenStack specialists in VMware’s Networking & Security Business Unit (NSBU). Part 1 discussed the basics of the Neutron integration for VMware NSX. Part 2 discussed foundational integrations for L2 and L3 network services.

Security Groups

Neutron Security Groups have historically implemented either Linux IPTables or Open vSwitch stateless matches to filter traffic at the hypervisor level. Both approaches have presented challenges to operations teams there is serious work underway aimed at improving the experience (VMware is a contributor to these efforts).

When using NSX and vSphere, we deploy a stateful firewall on each and every ESXi host. That means that every hypervisor will protect the microcosm of virtual machines that it hosts, providing the notion of a distributed data plane. We call this a distributed firewall, or DFW. The NSX DFW runs in the kernel of ESXi and enables granular security controls at the VM vNIC level. When using Neutron Security Groups, the NSX DFW is configured, via the plugin integration. Neutron Security Groups are mapped to instances, meaning the NSX DFW will protect the VM unit.

07-fig-3-01

 

Running an actual firewall on each hypervisor within your OpenStack cloud has the following benefits:

The NSX firewall scales as your ESXi footprint grows. The mere act of increasing your compute capacity due to the organic growth of your business, automatically means you are also adding security and compliance to your virtual infrastructure.

It is important to note that Neutron Security Groups and NSX micro-segmentation can be used standalone, without adopting L2 overlays and L3 virtualization. While not as flexible as a full network virtualization implementation, the micro-segmentation use case is very popular with our customers and provides a great on ramp for customers to introduce OpenStack and NSX without disrupting whatever VLAN operational model may already be in place.

Load Balancing

As of the Kilo version of the NSX plugin, Neutron LBaaS v1.0 support was incorporated. The workflow includes the following capabilities:

  • Tenants are able to create application pools (initially empty).
  • Tenants add several members to the pool (instance IP address).
  • Tenants create one or several health monitors.
  • Tenants associate the health monitors with the pool.
  • The tenant finally creates a virtual IP (VIP) with the pool.
  • Supported protocols: TCP, HTTP and HTTPS.

08-fig-3-02

As with other network services in our implementation, we leverage the NSX Edge Services Gateway (ESG) as an inline load balancer as well as a Neutron router. The NSX load balancer is very feature-rich, and it is ready to support the Neutron LBaaS 2.0 API spec in a future version of the plugin.

Summary – Supported Topologies

The table below summarizes the topologies supported by the NSX-Neutron plugin:

Use Case Comments
VLAN-backed L2, no L3 services Micro-segmentation only No overlays. Security Groups leverage Distributed Firewall policies
VLAN-backed L2, L3 services, LBaaS optional Leverage VLANs for L2, NSX Edge for L3 No overlays. L3 provided by NSX Edge. No distributed routing support. Static routes only
L2/L3 overlays, no NAT, LBaaS optional Enterprise customers that don’t need overlapping IP addresses Can use distributed router and/or NSX Edge. No overlapping IPs allowed. Static routes only. Very efficient. Preferred enterprise model
L2/L3 overlay, NAT, LBaaS optional Enterprise customers that need overlapping IPs Can use distributed router and/or NSX Edge. Static routes only. Very efficient. Cloud provider/service provider preferred model

Conclusion – Why NSX-v with OpenStack Neutron?

The benefits of NSX align with the requirements of a robust OpenStack private cloud implementation, which are:

  • Agility – Networking at the speed of apps.
  • Mobility – Provision anywhere, move anywhere.
  • Security – Micro-segment, detect anywhere, detect early
  • Multi-tenancy – Share hardware across multiple tenants.
  • Simplified operations – Centrally manage, monitor everywhere.

By leveraging the NSX Neutron Plugin for vSphere developed by VMware, cloud administrators can introduce NSX into their OpenStack environment and offer their users and developers the open APIs they require, all without compromising uptime, stability and scalability.

This concludes the series discussing OpenStack Neutron integrations with VMware NSX. You can get some hands-on experience with VMware Integrated OpenStack with our revamped VMworld Hands-on Lab (HOL-1620) featuring VMware Integrated OpenStack and NSX Optimized for vSphere. You can also check out Part 1 and Part 2 of this blog series to read more about NSX integrations with OpenStack.

Marcos Hernandez is a Staff Systems Engineer in the Network and Security Business Unit (NSBU). He is responsible for supporting large Global Enterprise accounts and providing technical guidance around VMware’s suite of networking and cloud solutions, including NSX and OpenStack. Marcos has a background in datacenter networking design and expert knowledge in routing and switching technologies. Marcos holds the CCIE (#8283) and VCIX certifications, and he has a Masters Degree in Telecommunications from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

OpenStack Networking with VMware NSX, Part 2

Today’s blog post is the second entry in a series by Marcos Hernandez, one of the OpenStack specialists in VMware’s Networking & Security Business Unit (NSBU). Part 1 discussed the basics of the Neutron integration for VMware NSX. Part 3 will be published in the upcoming weeks. So, check back for more on this topic!

L2 Services

As we discussed in our previous article, when a tenant creates a Neutron network (or networks), the plugin signals NSX Manager to provision a logical switch (or switches), which are overlay constructs that utilize VXLAN to create L2 segments over L3 physical networks. VXLAN is an industry standard, co-developed by VMware and others and supported across the board. Over the past couple of years, VXLAN overlays have been largely demystified and the initial objections (like performance, lack of visibility, etc.) have given way to more practical concerns (like changes in operational processes, automation, etc.). Customers and vendors are getting more educated about each other’s vision and together are making VXLAN, and Software Defined Networking for that matter, a reality in their environments.

These L2 segments, overlays as they may be, are just that: L2 segments. Without a router to connect them together or to other networks, they are completely isolated from each other. An OpenStack Cloud administrator can control, via quotas, the number of Neutron networks allowed per tenant.

L3 Services

Tenants in OpenStack are allowed, by default, to create their own IP subnets and routers. We will cover some of the NSX capabilities available with the Neutron plugin. Before we do that though, just a quick parenthesis about self-service in general: As OpenStack gains more traction in the Enterprise, we are learning that these self-service capabilities may not be desirable. Admins may want to remain in control of the IP subnetting, for example, especially if the use case calls for routable IP address space everywhere. OpenStack lacks the necessary controls to enforce this type of restrictions, so short of forbidding API access to specific functions or simply relying on the good-old honor system, customers have little to no choice when it comes to the built-in OpenStack governance. Projects like OpenStack Congress are attempting to bridge this gap, and some commercial products are already providing the controls that IT requires. vRealize Automation (vRA) is a VMware platform that offers comprehensive, scalable governance and could potentially leverage extension packages to drive provisioning workflows in OpenStack.

 

Back to the L3 services discussion, we stated that a tenant could create Neutron routers. The NSX-Neutron plugin will translate this provisioning request and signal NSX Manager to create an NSX Edge Services Gateway, or ESG. The ESG is a network appliance that supports a vast number of network features (not all of which are visible by OpenStack, by the way) and that is broadly used in our integration.

03-fig-2-01

Once the Neutron router is created, our previously provisioned Web and App Neutron networks (L2 segments) can be connected to it and routing between them will be available.

The uplink of a Neutron router can be connected to an External network. This is also known as setting the gateway. This External network must sit on routable IP address space within the organization and is also the network where floating IPs reside. If the tenant networks sit on RFC1918 space, then the Neutron router must do Network Address Translation, or NAT (source NAT for internal to external access and DNAT for floating IPs). If the tenant networks sit on routable subnets, then the router does not have to do NAT.

The tenant networks can also be VLAN-backed, instead of VXLAN-backed. If the tenant wants to or has to use VLANs instead of VXLANs, then the admin must create these networks on behalf of the tenant.

Tenant routers can be exclusive (defined at provisioning time using an API extension) or shared (default behavior). Depending on your performance and scalability expectations, you will choose one or the other.

When using NSX, the Neutron L3 services may include a distributed router, which is a very powerful capability in NSX that allows for the optimization of East-West traffic in routed topologies. This is a good example of an enterprise-grade capability of NSX and differentiator from the reference implementation, which can be leveraged without compromising the basic tenet of OpenStack in keeping the API open. A distributed router sends traffic from the source hypervisor to the destination hypervisor without hairpinning the packets through an NSX ESG or a physical router SVI. This increases performance significantly and streamlines traffic engineering within the data center. 04-fig-2-02

Finally, Neutron only supports static routing, which means that when using NSX with your OpenStack implementation, dynamic routing is not an option. NSX supports both OSPF and BGP, but until Neutron supports either one, tenants won’t be able to use dynamic routing. Efforts to implement a BGP speaker in OpenStack began during the Juno cycle and are still ongoing. When this work is complete, the NSX platform, due to its native support of BGP, will be ready to support dynamic routing once the Neutron plugin has been updated.

The picture below shows the basic topologies supported  by the NSX-Neutron plugin:

05-fig-2-03

DHCP Services

In our implementation of DHCP, we replace the dnsmasq process that is used by the reference implementation with an NSX Edge Services Gateway configured with static DHCP bindings. This approach has proven to be very reliable at scale (thousands of VMs).

There is logic in the NSX-Neutron plugin that will automatically determine how to use an Edge Services Gateway for DHCP services. Depending on the use case (overlapping IPs vs. non-overlapping IPs) the same ESG may be reused for multiple tenant networks, as the picture below shows: 06-fig-2-04

 

In Part 3 of this article series, we will discuss the implementation of critical Neutron services such as security groups and Load-Balancing-as-a-Service. In the meantime, check out our revamped VMworld Hands-on Lab (HOL-1620) featuring VMware Integrated OpenStack and NSX Optimized for vSphere.

Marcos Hernandez is a Staff Systems Engineer in the Network and Security Business Unit (NSBU). He is responsible for supporting large Global Enterprise accounts and providing technical guidance around VMware’s suite of networking and cloud solutions, including NSX and OpenStack. Marcos has a background in datacenter networking design and expert knowledge in routing and switching technologies. Marcos holds the CCIE (#8283) and VCIX certifications, and he has a Masters Degree in Telecommunications from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

OpenStack Networking with VMware NSX, Part 1

Today’s blog post is the start of a series by Marcos Hernandez, one of the OpenStack specialists in VMware’s Networking & Security Business Unit (NSBU). Part 2 and Part 3 will be published in the upcoming weeks. So, check back for more on this topic!

As OpenStack becomes more ubiquitous in the industry, cloud architects are looking for ways to provide enterprise-grade network and security services to their consumers without compromising the primary objectives of an OpenStack-based private cloud, which include:

  • Vendor-neutral APIs.
  • Infrastructure choice and flexibility.
  • A public cloud experience with on-premises infrastructure.

Neutron, the networking project in OpenStack, has come a long way in the last few years, adding powerful capabilities at a very fast pace while enabling rich network workflows and a variety of use cases. According to the latest user survey data, Neutron is favored over Nova networking in ~60% of the production OpenStack deployments, which suggests an increased interest to move off flat (VLAN-based) topologies. There is general consensus in the OpenStack community that a cloud that lacks rich network functionality is a mediocre cloud.

As more features are added to Neutron, its architecture becomes more complex (a universal perception amongst OpenStack users). As of the Kilo release, the Neutron community has wisely decided to “decompose” Neutron. The general idea is that Neutron will remain focused on core L2 and L3 services, while L4-L7 services will be “pluggable” and abide by a well-known extensible data model. For vendors like VMware, this is great news. We now have a reference architecture to develop against, promote our value-add, and expose the unique capabilities of NSX.  We can do this and still honor a consumption model that prioritizes the desirable northbound OpenStack APIs.

With all that said, it is important to note (and know) that Neutron core is developed using a reference implementation based on open source components, including:

  • Open vSwitch – hypervisor-level networking.
  • dnsmasq – DHCP/DNS services.
  • Linux iptables – for security groups.
  • L3-agent – routing services.
  • HAProxy – load balancing.

In a scaled-out production deployment, the reference implementation typically encounters challenges. As a result, OpenStack operators will either scale back the features deployed in an attempt to gain stability, or they will utilize a software-defined network provider.  This is widely recognized as factual and comes at no surprise once you understand how Neutron core is developed and tested.

The community is doing a great job at defining the core APIs and the extensibility model, while many vendors have also taken it upon themselves to test the scalability, reliability and upgradeability of an OpenStack-based solution using their own “productized” distributions. Often, as it is the case with VMware NSX, vendors will replace the reference open source components with their own technology. OpenStack consumers don’t notice the difference; they still interact with the northbound Neutron APIs by means of plugins and drivers, which “translate” the Neutron API calls into private, southbound calls targeted at the vendor’s infrastructure. In the case of VMware NSX Optimized for vSphere, such interactions look like this:

openstack-vsphere-nsx-interaction

Neutron services leverage a VMware-developed plugin that makes API calls to NSX Manager, which is the API provider and management plane of NSX.  This Neutron plugin is itself an open source project and can be used with ANY OpenStack implementation (DIY and/or off-the-shelf). VMware offers its own OpenStack distribution, VMware Integrated OpenStack, which natively integrates the NSX-Neutron plugin, in addition to other plugins and drivers that connect OpenStack compute and storage services to vSphere.  Leveraging enterprise-grade server virtualization with vSphere and enterprise-grade networking with NSX, customers will enjoy an enterprise-grade OpenStack infrastructure layer, while leveraging the vSphere skillset and tools (vMotion, host maintenance mode, DRS, etc.) which typically are available in IT groups today.

In this post, we will double-click on the Neutron-NSX interactions and will describe how NSX ultimately brings stability to Neutron. You can also see a recorded version of this content that was presented at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver.

Basic Neutron Workflows and NSX Equivalents
Neutron consists of a number of basic network workflows that are considered “table stakes”. These include:

  • L2 services: Ability for tenants to create and consume their own L2 networks.
  • L3 services: Ability for tenants to create and consume their own IP subnets and routers. These routers can connect intra-tenant application tiers and can also connect to the external world via NATed and non-NATed topologies.
  • Floating IPs: A “Floating IP” is nothing more than a DNAT rule, living on the Neutron router, that maps a routable IP sitting on the external side of that router (External network) to a private IP on the internal side (Tenant network). This floating IP forwards all ports and protocols to the corresponding private IP of the “instance” (VM) and is typically used in cases where there is IP overlap in tenant space.
  • DHCP Services: Ability for tenants to create their own DHCP address scopes.
  • Security Groups: Ability for tenants to create their own firewall policies (L3/L4) and apply them directly to an instance or a group of instances.
  • Load Balancing as-a-Service (LBaaS): Ability for tenants to create their own load balancing rules, virtual IPs and load balancing pools.

The picture below shows these basic workflows and their situation as it relates to the application, as well as the corresponding NSX element that is leveraged each time. For more information about NSX, please visit the official VMware NSX product page.

basic-neutron-workflows-nsx-equivalents

In Part 2 of this article series, we will dig deeper into the inner workings of the Neutron plugin implementation for NSX. In the meantime, check out our revamped VMworld Hands-on Lab (HOL-1620) featuring VMware Integrated OpenStack and NSX Optimized for vSphere.

Marcos Hernandez is a Staff Systems Engineer in the Network and Security Business Unit (NSBU). He is responsible for supporting large Global Enterprise accounts and providing technical guidance around VMware’s suite of networking and cloud solutions, including NSX and OpenStack. Marcos has a background in datacenter networking design and expert knowledge in routing and switching technologies. Marcos holds the CCIE (#8283) and VCIX certifications, and he has a Masters Degree in Telecommunications from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

New Hands-on Lab Available!

At VMworld US 2015, there was a new-and-improved hands-on lab (HOL-SDC-1620). Now, it’s available to all users on the public HoL site. Kudos to the HoL Lab Captains who got the new lab completed in time for the event: Marcos Hernandez, Jonathan Cham, Nathan Ness, and Tim Green!

VMware Integrated OpenStack updated lab available!
 

Some of the changes that we are excited about in the lab include:

  • OpenStack integrations for vRealize Operations Manager and vRealize Log Insight
  • Heat orchestration sample workflows
  • Advanced NSX configurations

At VMware, we aim to simplify deployment, consumption, and operations for OpenStack administrators. With the new-and-improved OpenStack with VMware vSphere and NSX lab, we do a great job of emphasizing all three areas for users to evaluate. Check it out today!

VMware Integrated OpenStack Video Series: Working with Networks

In our previous post, we discussed how developers can quickly provision application infrastructure using instances and images in OpenStack. Today, we’ll discuss an important topic: Networking! How do we configure the networks that OpenStack instances use to communicate with each other and with the outside world?

VMware Integrated OpenStack provides two networking options for your infrastructure:

  1. VMware NSX networking
  2. VMware vSphere Distributed Switch (VDS) networking

The VDS option is appropriate for simple networking use cases. That is, your instances only need to communicate on a few VLANs with no need for advanced functionality like overlapping IP addresses, neutron-provided layer 3 routing, etc. The NSX option allows for advanced networking use cases including private networks for tenants, attaching floating IPs to your instances, etc.

For the purposes of this article, we will focus on the VMware NSX option. Configuring VDS networking is a fairly simple process, and we’ll point out the difference in the configuration process where applicable.

The first step in setting up your OpenStack network service is configuring your external, or provider, network. This is the VLAN provisioned for your instances to have access to the outside world. The external network is configured by a user with administrator permissions using either the Horizon GUI or the neutron API/CLI.

When configuring the external network for the VMware NSX networking option, the provider network type is “Port Group”. The physical network is the port group ID (dvportgroup-50110 in my example) for the external network you defined in vSphere. See Figure 1 for a configuration example.

 

 

External network configuration for VMware NSX Networking

Figure 1: External network configuration for VMware NSX Networking

If you are working with the VDS networking option instead of the VMware NSX option, you specify the provider network type as “VLAN” with the physical network labeled simply “dvs”. The VLAN ID is specified in the Segmentation ID textbox. The “Shared” option must be selected so that your tenants can use this network when booting instances (See Figure 2 for a configuration example). VMware Integrated OpenStack will use this information to automatically create a port group on the VDS that you specified when you deployed OpenStack control plane.

 

 

External network configuration for VMware VDS Networking

Figure 2: External network configuration for VMware VDS Networking

Once your external network is defined, you define a subnet the external OpenStack network. Make sure to uncheck the “Enable DHCP” option, to specify the network address and gateway, and to specify the IP allocation range in case the entire subnet isn’t available for use.

Now that your external network configuration is complete, your tenants can allocate IP addresses for their instances using the OpenStack GUI, APIs, or CLIs as seen in our previous blog post.

The following video provides a detailed walkthrough of configuring OpenStack networks.

 

Stay tuned for next week’s blog post when we discuss the OpenStack storage service! In the meantime, you can learn more on the VMware Product Walkthrough site and on the VMware Integrated OpenStack product page.