Home > Blogs > OpenStack Blog for VMware > Tag Archives: DefCore

Tag Archives: DefCore

Apples To Oranges: Why vSphere & VIO are Best Bests for OpenStack Adoption

OpenStack doesn’t mandate defaults for compute, network and storage, which frees you to select the best technology. For many VMware customers, the best choice will be vSphere to provide OpenStack Nova compute capabilities.

 

It is commonly asserted that KVM is the only hypervisor to use in an OpenStack deployment. Yet every significant commercial OpenStack distro supports vSphere. The reasons for this broad support are clear.

Costs for commercial KVM are comparable to vSphere. In addition, vSphere has tremendous added benefits: widely available and knowledgeable staff, vastly simplified operations, and proven lifecycle management that can keep up with OpenStack’s rapid release cadence.

 

Let’s talk first about cost. Traditional, commercial KVM has a yearly recurring support subscription price. Red Hat OpenStack Platform-Standard 2 sockets can be found online at $11,611/year making the 3 year cost around $34,833[i]. VMware vSphere with Operations Management Enterprise Plus (multiplied by 2 to match Red Hat’s socket pair pricing) for 3 years, plus the $200/CPU/year VMware Integrated OpenStack SnS is $14,863[ii]. Even when a customer uses vCloud Suite Advanced, costs are on par with Red Hat. (Red Hat has often compared prices using VMware’s vCloud Suite Enterprise license to exaggerate cost differences.)

 

 

When 451 Research[iii] compared distro costs based on a “basket” of total costs in 2015 they found that commercial distros had a cost that was close to regular virtualization. And if VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) is the point of comparison, the costs would likely be even closer. The net-net is that cost turns out not to be a significant differentiator when it comes to commercial KVM compared with vSphere. This brings us to the significant technical and operational benefits vSphere brings to an OpenStack deployment.

 

In the beginning, it was assumed that OpenStack apps would build in the resiliency that used to be assumed from a vSphere environment, thus allowing vSphere to be removed. As the OpenStack project has matured, capabilities such as VMware vMotion and DRS (Distributed Resource Scheduler) have risen in importance to end users. Regardless of the application the stability and reliability of the underlying infrastructure matters.

 

There are two sets of reasons to adopt OpenStack on vSphere.

 

First, you can use VIO to quickly (minutes or hours instead of days or weeks) build a production-grade, operational OpenStack environment with the IT staff you already have, leveraging the battle-tested infrastructure your staff already knows and relies on. No other distro uses a rigorously tested combination of best-in-class compute (vSphere Ent+ for Nova), network (NSX for Neutron), and storage (VSAN for Cinder).

 

Second, only VMware, a long-time (since 2012), active (consistently a top 10 code contributor) OpenStack community member provides BOTH the best underlying infrastructure components AND the ongoing automation and operational tools needed to successfully manage OpenStack in production.

 

In many cases, it all adds up to vSphere being the best choice for production OpenStack.

 


[i] http://www.kernelsoftware.com/products/catalog/red_hat.html
[ii] http://store.vmware.com/store/vmware/en_US/cat/ThemeID.2485600/categoryID.66071400
[iii] https://451research.com/images/Marketing/press_releases/CPI_PR_05.01.15_FINAL.pdf


This Article was written by Cameron Sturdevant,  Product Line Manager at VMware

Issues With Interoperability in OpenStack & How DefCore is Addressing Them

Interoperability is built into the founding conception of OpenStack. But as the platform has gained popularity, it’s also become ever more of a challenge.

“There’s a lot of different ways to consume OpenStack and it’s increasingly important that we figure out ways to make things interoperable across all those different methods of consumption,” notes VMware’s Mark Voelker in a presentation to the most recent OpenStack Summit titled: “ (view the slide set here).

 

Voelker, a VMware OpenStack architect and co-chair of the OpenStack Foundation’s DefCore Committee, shares the stage with OpenStack Foundation interoperability engineer Chris Hoge. Together they offer an overview of the integration challenges OpenStack faces today, and point to the work DefCore is doing to help deliver on the OpenStack vision. For anyone working, or planning to work, with VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO), the talk is a great backgrounder on what’s being done to ensure that VIO integrates as well with non-VMware OpenStack technologies as it does with VMware’s own.

Hoge begins by outlining DefCore’s origins as a working group founded to fulfill the OpenStack Foundation mandate for a “faithful implementation test suite to ensure compatibility and interoperability for products.” DefCore has since issued five guidelines that products can now be certified as following, allowing them to carry the logo.

After explaining what it takes to meet the DefCore guidelines, Hoge reviews issues that remain unresolved. “The good news about OpenStack is that it’s incredibly flexible. There are any number of ways you can configure your OpenStack Cloud. You have your choice of hypervisors, storage drivers, network drivers – it’s a really powerful platform,” he observes. But that very richness and flexibility also makes it harder to ensure that two instances of OpenStack will work well together, he explains.

 

Among areas with issues are image operations, networking, policy and configuration discovery, API iteration, provability, and project documentation, reports Voelker. Discoverability and how to map capabilities to APIs are also a major concern, as is lack of awareness about DefCore’s guidelines. “There’s still some confusion about what kind of things people should be taking into account when they are making technical choices,” Hoge adds.

The OpenStack Foundation is therefore working to raise the profile of interoperability as requirement and awareness of the meaning behind the “OpenStack Powered” logo. DefCore itself is interacting closely with developers and vendors in the community to address the integration challenges they’ve identified and enforce a measurable standard on new OpenStack contributions.

 

“Awareness is half the battle,” notes Voelker, before he and Hoge outline the conversations DefCore is currently leading, outcomes they’ve already achieved, and what DefCore is doing next – watch for a report on top interoperability issues soon, more work on testing, and a discussion on new guidelines for NFV-ready clouds.

 

If you are interested in how VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) conforms with DefCore standards, you can more find information and experts to contact on our product homepage. You can also check out our Hands-on Lab, or try VIO for yourself and download and install VMware Integrated OpenStack direct.

VMware is OpenStack DefCore Compliant!

 

VIO is OpenStack Powered!

OpenStack Foundation Logo for Distributions that are Certified DefCore

The VMware Integrated OpenStack team is proud to announce that our latest release is compliant with the DefCore 2015.07 standard, making it one of the first commercial distributions to do so! You can see the test results hosted on the RefStack site.

As we mentioned in the “How Open is VMware Integrated OpenStack” post, VMware is dedicated to giving end users a standard OpenStack experience on top of the data center infrastructure that IT operations staff trust and rely on. For that reason, we are proactive in cooperating with the community’s efforts to minimize distribution fragmentation, and DefCore testing is integral to our software development lifecycle.

This is exciting news to head into the Tokyo OpenStack Summit with, and we look forward to speaking with our customers, partners, and community contributors at the event.  See you there!

You can learn more about VMware Integrated OpenStack on the VMware Product Walkthrough site and on the VMware Integrated OpenStack product page.