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16 Partners, One Live Demo – OpenStack Barcelona Interop Challenge

 

During Wednesday morning’s keynote session at the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, I will be on stage along with several other vendors to show off some of our latest work on interoperability between OpenStack clouds.  We will be demonstrating a single workload running successfully on over a dozen different vendors’ OpenStack products without modification, including VMware Integrated OpenStack 3.0.  The idea got started back in April at the last OpenStack Summit when our friends at IBM challenged vendors to demonstrate that their products were interoperable publicly.


VMware has long been a proponent of fostering interoperability between OpenStack clouds.  I currently co-chair the Interop Working Group (formerly known as the DefCore Committee), and VMware Integrated OpenStack 3.0 is an approved OpenStack-Powered product that is compliant with the 2016.08 interoperability guideline, the newest and strictest guideline approved by the OpenStack Foundation Board of Directors.  We also helped produce the Interop Working Group’s first ever report on interoperability issues.  So why do we care about interoperability?  Shouldn’t everything built on OpenStack behave the same anyhow?  Well, to quote the previously mentioned report on interoperability issues:

 

“OpenStack is tremendously flexible, feature-rich, powerful software that can be used to create clouds that fit a wide variety of use cases including software development, web services and e-commerce, network functions virtualization (NFV), video processing, and content delivery to name a few. Commercial offerings built on OpenStack are available as public clouds, installable software distributions, managed private clouds, appliances, and services. OpenStack can be deployed on thousands of combinations of underpinning storage, network, and compute hardware and software. Because of the incredible amount of flexibility OpenStack offers and the constraints of the many use cases it can address, interoperability between OpenStack clouds is not always assured: due to various choices deployers make, different clouds may have some inconsistent behaviors.  One of the goals of the [Interop Working Group]’s work is to create high interoperability standards so that end users of clouds can expect certain behaviors to be consistent between different OpenStack-Powered Clouds and products.”

 

Think of it this way: another amazingly flexible, powerful thing we use daily is electricity.  Electricity is pretty much the same stuff no matter who supplies it to you or what you are using it for, but the way you consume it might be different for different use cases.  The outlet I plug my laptop into at home is a different shape and supplies a different voltage than the one my electric oven is connected into since the oven needs a lot more juice to bake my cookies than my laptop does to type up a blog post.  My home’s air conditioner does not even have a plug: it is wired directly into the house’s circuit breaker.  I consume most of my electricity as a service provided by my power company, but I can also generate some of my power with solar panels I own myself as long as their outputs can are connected to my power grid.  Moreover, to power up my laptop here in Barcelona, I brought along a plug adapter since Europe has some differences in their power grid based on their set of standards and requirements.  However, even though there are some differences, there are many commonalities: electricity is delivered over metal wiring, terminated at some wall socket, most of the world uses one of a few different voltage ranges, and you pay for it based on consumption.  OpenStack is similar: An OpenStack deployment built for NFV workloads might have some different characteristics and interfaces exposed than one made as a public compute cloud.

 

What makes the Interop Challenge interesting is that it is complimentary to the work of the Interop Working Group in that it looks at interoperability in a slightly different light.  To date, the Interop Working Group has mostly focused its efforts on API-level interoperability.  It does so by ensuring that products bearing the OpenStack-Powered mark, pass a set of community-maintained Tempest tests to prove that they expose a set of capabilities (things like booting up a VM with the Nova v2 API or getting a list of available images using the Glance v2 API).  Products bearing the OpenStack-Powered logo are also required to use designated sections of upstream code, so consumers know they are getting community-developed code driving those capabilities.  While the Interop Working Group’s guidelines look primarily at the server side of things, the Interop Challenge seems to address a slightly different aspect of interoperability: workload portability.  Rather than testing a particular set of API’s, the Interop Challenge took a client-side approach by running a real workload against different clouds—in this case, a LAMP stack application with a load-balanced web server tier and a database backend tier, all deployed via Ansible.  The idea was to take a typical application with commonly-used deployment tools and prove that it “just works” across several different OpenStack clouds.

 

In other words, the guidelines produced by the Interop Working Group assure you that certain capabilities are available to end users (just as I can be reasonably confident that any hotel room I walk into will have a socket in the wall from which I can get electricity).  The Interop Challenge compliments that by looking at a more valid use case: it verifies that I can plug in my laptop and get some work done.

 

Along the way, participants also hoped to begin defining some best practices for making workloads more portable among OpenStack clouds to account for some of the differences that are a natural side effect of OpenStack’s flexibility.  For example, we found that the LAMP stack workload was more portable if we let the user specify certain attributes of the cloud he intended to use – such as the name of network the instances should be attached to, the image and flavor that should be used to boot up instances, and block device or network interface names that would be utilized by that image.   Even though we will only be showing one particular workload on stage, that one workload serves as a starting point to help flesh out more best practices in the future.

 

If you want to learn more about VMware’s work on interoperability or about VMware Integrated OpenStack, see us at the keynote or stop by our booth at the OpenStack, and if you’re ready to deploy OpenStack today, download it now and get started, or dare your IT team to try our VMware Integrated OpenStack Hands-On-Lab, no installation required.


*This article was written by Mark Voelker – OpenStack Architect at VMware

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