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Today we have a guest post from our very own Stephen Gardner from the VMware Fusion Support Team.

The VMware Fusion Migration Assistant is designed to make it easy to bring over your complete Windows PC to a virtual machine on the Mac. For the vast majority of VMware Fusion users, it is the ideal solution to migrate their entire Windows PC. The PC will need to have our “PC Migration Agent” installed. You can install this by using your Fusion CD with the PC, or by downloading it from http://www.vmware.com/go/pc2mac.

The program will walk you through how to use it, and we have more information and a guide here:  Best practices for using and troubleshooting Migration Assistant.

If you have issues with the Migration Assistant migrating over the network or want to only migrate some drives on your Windows PC, you should consider VMware Converter. (VMware vCenter Converter is a separate, free program that will allow you to convert a Windows or Linux PC for use with any of multiple VMware products; it will not work with Windows 7.)

You can register to download Converter here: http://www.vmware.com/download/eula/converter_starter.html, and there’s a video walkthrough for version 3 on our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/VMwareELearning#p/u/18/2cpIbSql6ok.

Words of advice:

The process to move your PC to your Mac (whether you use Converter or Migration Assistant) will take several hours, and is largely dependent on the speeds of your computers, the amount of data you’re converting (the size of your PC), and your network connection (if you’re using Migration Assistant). You should plan on letting the program run overnight, and possibly over the course of 1 or 2 days for a PC with a lot of big files (> 100GB total).

A wireless connection is okay, but much slower and not as reliable as a wired connection. There’s nothing worse than a failed connection while trying to perform a 1 or 2 day operation! If your computers do connect to the internet wirelessly, you can still use Ethernet cables to plug them both into your router/airport to improve reliability; better safe than sorry.