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What’s New with Developer and Automation Interfaces for vSphere 6.5?

VMworld Europe 2016 wrapped up last week and there’s been a lot of new and exciting products and features announced. One of the more exciting things that have been announced have been around the automation and development space.

As seen from the keynote in Barcelona (see about 35 minutes in), VMware is taking the developer and automation specialists seriously. In the new vSphere 6.5 release we are providing simplified and modern API interfaces and giving customers their choice of access with language bindings and automation tools to a fresh new modern set of APIs.

What’s New

VMware vCenter has received some new extensions to its REST based API. In vSphere 6.0, this API set provides the ability to manage the Content Library and Tagging but now also includes the ability to manage and configure the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) based functionality and basic VM management.

REST API Documentation

VCSA API

The VCSA’s new and simplified REST based API will consistently be able to manage things like how to access the appliance, managing user accounts, checking on the health of the appliance or even the services of the appliance itself, networking configurations like firewall rules or proxy settings, being able to provide a file based backup or restore of appliance and even managing system settings like NTP or just checking the uptime or version.
 

Virtual Machine API

Additional functionality has been added for handling the management of VMs, using the range of interfaces (including REST) you will be able to read information, create, update and even delete VMs, as well as setting their power state and working with the hardware. Some example hardware tasks would be connecting the CD-ROM, updating the RAM allotment, adding a network adapter, removing a hard disk, and so forth.

All of this not just available via the developer and automation tooling but also simplified to make sure they are easily discoverable and the use of strong defaults means you only specify the information that is needed, a simple example of this means that to create a VM is now as easy as 12 lines of JSON and a single API call.

Discover the APIs with the new API Explorer

What’s the best way to learn about these awesome new APIs? How about checking out the API Explorer that lives on the vCenter. It’s available on the vCenter server at the following URL: http://*vCenter URL*/apiexplorer Once connected, the API Explorer will display information about the numerous endpoints available in order to easily understand the API models. The API Explorer also allows users to expand each API call and check out the required fields, understand the request body, see the available filter information, as well as a list of response messages. One of my favorite capabilities, the ability to click a button and trying out the calls live!

vSphere API Explorer

Process Improvements

Process Improvements for Developer and Automation Interfaces
Due to how the above APIs are defined, we also have the ability to greatly improve our turnaround time on providing resources! This process allows us to provide a number of developer and automation based tool integrations out of the box.

The SDK with new improved, simplified samples will include Java, .NET, Python, Ruby, and Perl.

This also allows our automation tools to be provided on day 0 as well. The associated PowerCLI cmdlets, Datacenter CLI commands (new in 6.5), vRealize Orchestrator workflows, and so forth are all part of the process. Lastly, and probably the best part, the documentation is created as well. The documentation will be fully featured and much easier to understand!

Summary

vSphere 6.5 brings all the features and improvements from above and many more. One thing is certain though, the future is bright when it comes to VMware’s developer and automation interfaces. This blog post shows a summary of a lot of new features that each deserve their own blog posts, watch this blog over the next couple of months as there will be several more blog posts diving further into each of these areas!

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Kyle Ruddy

About Kyle Ruddy

Kyle Ruddy is a Senior Technical Marketing Engineer at VMware in the Cloud Platform Business Unit. Kyle currently focuses on vSphere with Operations Management as well as all things API, SDK, and CLI. Kyle can be found blogging on VMware blogs, http://blogs.vmware.com/vSphere and http://blogs.vmware.com/PowerCLI, and his personal blog, http://www.thatcouldbeaproblem.com. You can follow Kyle on twitter as @kmruddy.

One thought on “What’s New with Developer and Automation Interfaces for vSphere 6.5?

  1. Pingback: New vSphere 6.5 APIs worth checking out | virtuallyGhetto

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