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Tag Archives: VDI design

So You Virtualized Your Desktop Environment. Now what?

mmarx.phpBy Mike Marx

Most of my customers start with a low-risk user group consisting of a large number of users with identical application requirements. This is the common scenario when starting out on the virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) journey and ‘testing the waters.’ With proper design efforts, initial implementations are highly successful.

I spend the majority of my consulting effort working with customers helping them create their initial VDI design. Designs can be simple or complicated, but they all utilize a common technical approach for success: understanding user requirements, and calculating infrastructure sizing. But I’m not blogging about technical calculations or infrastructure sizing. Instead I would like to address a VDI design challenge customers face as they expand their VDI design: user application assignments.

While resource requirements are simple to assess, calculate and scale, application delivery becomes increasingly challenging as more users are added to the design. VDI administrators struggle to manage increasing numbers of desktop users – each having unique application requirements.

Applications are easy to add to a large static group of user desktops using linked-clones. But when unique user groups are introduced, and application requirements change, administrators are confronted with the challenge of maintaining a large number of small desktop pools – or impacting large groups of users in order to change an application assignment.

So how do we design an effective stateless desktop and maintain application diversity amongst unique user groups? VMware Horizon AppVolumes is the answer.

Using AppVolumes, VDI designs become simple to understand and implement. Once applications are effectively removed from the VDI desktop, VDI administrators are left with a simple stateless desktop. But users aren’t productive with an empty desktop operating system; they need applications – and lots of them.

Without going into deep technical detail (there are excellent blogs on this topic already) AppVolumes captures the application files, folders and registry components, and encapsulates them into a transportable virtual disk called an AppStack. As the user logs on to a stateless desktop, the assigned AppStack(s) will automatically attach and merge the user’s applications with the desktop virtual machine.

Now users are presented with a stateless desktop that is uniquely assembled with all of their applications. AppVolumes’ attached applications interact with other applications— and the operating system—as if they were natively installed, so the user experience is seamless.

Now that applications are no longer an impediment to VDI designs, VDI administrators are able to support large groups of users and application requirements using the same stateless desktop pool. By following the KISS principle: “Keep It Simply Stateless,” AppVolumes will open the door to new design possibilities and wider adoption by users and IT administrators.


Mike Marx is a Consulting Architect with the End User Computing group at VMware. He has been an active consultant using VMware technologies since 2005.  His certifications include : VCAP-DTD, VCP-DT, VCA-WM, VCA-DT, VCP2-5 as well as being an expert in VMware View, Thinapp, vSphere and SRM.