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Tag Archives: vCenter Operations Manager

Begin Your Journey to vRealize Operations Manager

By Brent Douglas

In early December, VMware launched an exciting new array of updates to its products. For some products, this update was a refinement of already widely used functionality and capabilities. For other products, the December release marked a new direction and new path forward. One such product is vRealize Operations Manager.

With VMware’s acquisition of Integrien’s patented real-time performance analytics solution in August 2010, VMware added a powerful tool to its arsenal of virtualization management solutions. This tool, vCenter Operations Manager, enabled customers to begin managing beyond “what my environment is doing now” and into “what my environment will be doing in 30 minutes—and beyond?” In essence, with vCenter Operations Manager, customers gained a tool that could predict―and ultimately prevent―the phone from ringing.

Since August 2010, vCenter Operations Manager received bug fixes, regular updates, and new features and capabilities. Even with those, the VMware product designers and engineers knew they could produce a new version of the product that captured and extended the capabilities of vCenter Operations Manager. On December 9, VMware released that tool—vRealize Operations Manager.

In many respects, vRealize Operations Manager, is a new product from the ground up. Due to the differences between vCenter Operations Manager v5.x and vRealize Operations Manager v6.x, current users of vCenter Operations Manager cannot simply apply a v6.x update to existing environments. For customers with little historical data or default policies, the best course forward may be to just install and begin using vRealize Operations Manager. Other customers, with deep historical data and advanced configuration/policies, the best path forward is likely a migration of existing data and configuration information from their vCenter Operations Manager v5.x instance.

A full discussion of migration planning and procedures is available in the vRealize Operations Manager Customization and Administration Guide. This guide also outlines many common vCenter Operations Manager scenarios and suggests migration paths to vRealize Operations Manager.

Important note: In order to migrate data and/or configuration information from an existing vCenter Operations Manager instance, the instance must be at least v.5.8.1 at a minimum, and preferably v5.8.3 or higher.

Question 1: Should any portion of my existing vCenter Operations Manager instance(s) be migrated?

VMware believes you are a candidate for a full migration (data and configuration information) if you can answer “yes” to any one of the following:

  • Have you operationalized capacity planning in vCenter Operations Manager 5.8.x?
    • Actively reclaiming waste
    • Reallocating resources
  • Have you operationalized vCenter Operations Manager to be performance- and health monitoring-based?
  • Do you act upon the performance alerts that are generated by vCenter Operations Manager?
  • Is any aspect of data in vCenter Operations Manager feeding another production system?
    • Raw metrics, alerts, reports, emails, etc
  • Do you have a company policy to retain monitoring data?
    • Does your current vCenter Operations Manager instance fall into this category (e.g., it’s running in TEST)?

VMware believes you are a candidate for a configuration-only migration if you answer “yes” to any one of the following:

  • Are you happy with your current configuration?
    • Dashboards
    • Policies
    • Users
    • Super Metrics

— AND —

  • I do not need to save the data I have collected
    • Running in a test environment or proof-of-concept you have refined and find useful
    • Not really using the data yet

If you answered “no” to these questions, you should install and try vRealize Operations Manager today. You are ready to go with a fresh install without migrating any existing data or configuration information.

Question 2: If some portion of an existing vCenter Operations Manager instance is to be migrated, who should perform the migration?

vRealize Operations Manager is capable of migrating existing data and configuration information from an existing vCenter Operations Manager instance. However, complicating factors may require an in-depth look by a VMware services professional to ensure a successful migration. The following table outlines some of the complicating factors and suggests paths forward.

Consulting_blog_table_012815

 

That’s it! With a bit of upfront planning you can be well on your journey to vRealize Operations Manager! The information above addresses the “big hitters” for planning a migration to vRealize Operations Manager from vCenter Operations Manager. As mentioned, a full discussion of migration planning and procedures is available in the vRealize Operations Manager Customization and Administration Guide.

On a personal note, I am excited about vRealize Operations Manager. Although vCenter Operations Manager served VMware and its customers well for many years, it is time for something new and exciting. I encourage you to try vRealize Operations Manager today. This post represents information produced in collaboration with David Moore, VMware Professional Services, and Dave Overbeek, VMware Technical Marketing team. I thank them for their contributions and continued focus on VMware and its customers.


Brent Douglas is a VMware Cloud Technical Solutions Architect

DevOps and Performance Management

Michael_Francis

By Michael Francis

Continuing on from Ahmed’s recent blog on DevOps, I thought I would share an experience I had with a customer regarding performance management for development teams.

Background

I was working with an organization that is essentially an independent software vendor (ISV) in a specific vertical; their business is writing software in the gambling sector, and⎯in some cases⎯hosting that software to deliver services to their partners. It is a very large revenue stream for them, and their development expertise and software functionality is their differentiation.

Due to historical stability issues and lack of trust between the application development teams and the infrastructure team, the organization introduced into the organization a new VP of Infrastructure and an Infrastructure Chief Architect a number of years previous. They focused on changing the process and culture − and also aligning the people. They took our technology and implemented an architecture that aligned with our best practices with the primary aim of delivering a stable, predictable platform.

This transformation of people/process and technology provided a stable infrastructure platform that soon improved the trust and credibility of the infrastructure team with the applications development teams for their test and development requirements.

Challenges

The applications team in this organization, as you would expect, carries significant influence. Even though the applications team had come to trust virtual infrastructure for test and development, they still had reservations about a private cloud model for production. Their applications had significant demands on infrastructure and needed to guarantee transactions per second rates committed across multiple databases; any latency could cause significant processing issues, and therefore, loss of revenue. Visibility across the stack was a concern.

The applications team  responsible for this critical in-house developed application designed the application to instrument it’s performance by writing out flat files on each server with application-specific information about transaction commit times and other application specific performance information.

Irrelevant of complete stack visibility, the applications team responsible for this application was challenged with how to monitor the performance of this custom distributed application performance data from a central point. The applications team also desired some means of understanding normal performance data levels, as well as a way to gain insight into the stack to see where any abnormality originated.

Due to the trust that had developed with the infrastructure team, they engaged with them to determine whether the infrastructure team had any capability to support their performance monitoring needs.

Solution

The infrastructure team was just beginning to review their needs for performance and capacity management tools for their Private Cloud. The team had implemented a proof-of-concept of vCenter Operations Manager and found its visualizations useful; so they asked us to work with the applications team to determine whether we could digest this custom performance information.

We started by educating them on the concept of a dynamic learning monitoring system. It had to allow hard thresholds to be set, but also⎯more importantly⎯determine the spectrum of normal behavior based upon data pattern prediction algorithms for an application; both as a whole and each of its individual components.

We discussed the benefits of a data analytics system that could take a stream of data, and
irrespective of the data source, create a monitored object from it. The data analytics system had to be able to assign the data elements in the stream to metrics, start determining normality, provide a comparison to any hard thresholds, and provide the visualization.

The applications team was keen to investigate and so our proof-of-concept expanded to include the custom performance data from this in-house developed application.

The Outcome

The screenshot below shows VMware vCenter Operations Manager. It shows the Resource Type screen that allows us to define a customer Resource Type, which allows us to represent the application-specific metrics and the application itself.

MFrancis1

To get the data into vCenter Operation Manager we simply wrote a script that opened the flat file on each of the servers participating in the application; it read the file and then posted the information into vCenter Operations Manager using its HTTP POST adapter. This adapter provides the ability to post data from any endpoint that needs to be monitored; because of this vCenter Operations Manager is a very flexible tool.

In this instance we posted into vCenter Operation Manager a combination of application-specific counters and Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) counters from the Windows operating system platform the apps run on. This is shown in the following screenshot.

MFrancis2

You can see the Resource Kind is something I called vbs_vcops_httpost, which is not a ‘standard’ monitored object in vCenter Operations Manager; the product has created this based on the data stream I was pumping into it. I just needed to tell vCenter Operations Manager what metrics it should monitor from the data stream – which you can see in the following screenshot.

 MFrancis3

For each attribute (metric) we can configure whether hard thresholds are used and whether vCenter Operations Manager should use that metric as an indicator of normality. We refer to the normality as dynamic thresholds.

Once we have identified which metrics we want to mark, we can create spectrums of normality for them and affect the health of the application, which allows us to create visualizations. The screenshot below shows an example of a simple visualization. It shows the applications team a round-trip time metric plotted over time, alongside a standard windows WMI performance counter for CPU.

MFrancis4

In introducing the capabilities to monitor custom in-house developed applications using combinations of application-specific custom metrics, a standard guest operating system and platform metrics, the DevOps team now has visibility into the health of the whole stack. This enables them to see the impact of code changes against different layers of the stack so they can compare the before and after from the perspective of the spectrum of normality for varying key metrics.

This capability from a cultural perspective brought the applications development team and infrastructure team onto the same page; both teams gain an appreciation of any performance issues through a common view.

In my team we have developed services that enable our customers to adopt and mature a performance and capacity management capability for the hybrid cloud, which⎯in my view―is one of the most challenging considerations for hybrid cloud adoption.

 


Michael Francis is a Principal Systems Engineer at VMware, based in Brisbane.

vCloud Automation Center Disaster Recovery

Gary BlakeBy Gary Blake

Prior to the release of vCloud Automation Center (vCAC) v5.2 there was no awareness or understanding of vCenter Site Recovery Manager protecting virtual machines. However, with the introduction of vCAC v5.2, VMware now provides enhanced integration so vCAC can correctly discover the relationship between the primary and recovery virtual machines.

These enhancements consist of what may be considered minor modifications, but they are fundamental enough to ensure vCenter Site Recovery Manager (SRM) can be successfully implemented to deliver disaster recovery of virtual machines managed by vCAC.

GBlake 1

 

So What’s Changed?

When a virtual machine is protected by SRM a Managed Object Reference ID (or MoRefID) is created against the virtual machine record in the vCenter Server database.

Prior to SRM v5.5 a single virtual machine property was created on the placeholder virtual machine object in the recovery site vCenter Server database called “ManagedBy:SRM,placeholderVM,” but vCAC did not inspect this value, so it would attempt to add a second duplicate entry into its database. With the introduction of 5.2, when a data collection is run, vCAC now ignores virtual machines with this value set, thus avoiding the duplicate entry attempt.

In addition, SRM v5.5 introduced a second managed-by-property value that is placed on the virtual machine vCenter Server database record called “ManagedBy:SRM,testVM.” When a test recovery process is performed and data collection is run at the recovery site, vCAC inspects this value and ignores virtual machines with this set. This too avoids creating a duplicate entry in the vCAC database.

With the changes highlighted above, SRM v5.5 and later—and vCAC 5.2 and later—can now be implemented in tandem with full awareness of each other. However, one limitation still remains when moving a virtual machine into recovery or re-protect mode: vCAC does not properly recognize the move. To successfully perform these machine operations and continue managing the machine lifecycle, you must use the Change Reservation operation – which is still a manual task.

Introducing the CloudClient

In performing the investigation around the enhancements between SRM and vCAC just described, and on uncovering the need for the manual change of reservation, I spent some time with our Cloud Solution Engineering team discussing the need for finding a way to automate this step. They were already developing a tool called CloudClient, which is essentially a wrapper for our application programming interfaces that allows simple command line-driven steps to be performed, and suggested this could be developed to support this use case.

Conclusion

In order to achieve fully functioning integration between vCloud Automation Center (5.2 or later) and vCenter Site Recovery Manager, adhere to the following design decisions:

  • Configure vCloud Automation Center with endpoints for both the protected and recovery sites.
  • Perform a manual/automatic change reservation following a vCenter Site Recovery Manager planned for disaster migration.

GBlake2

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. When I fail over my virtual machines from the protected site to the recovery site, what happens if I request the built-in vCAC machine operations?

A. Once you have performed a Planned Migration or a Disaster Recovery process, as long as you have changed the reservation within the vCAC Admin UI for the virtual machine, machine operations will be performed in the normal way on the recovered virtual machine.

Q. What happens if I do not perform the Change Reservation step to a virtual machine once I’ve completed a Planned Migration or Disaster Recovery processand I then attempt to perform the built-in vCAC machine operations on the virtual machine?

A. Depending on which tasks you perform, some things are blocked by vCAC, and you see an error message in the log such as “The method is disabled by ‘com.vmware.vcDR’” and some actions look like they are being processed, but nothing happens. There are also a few actions that are processed regardless of the virtual machine failure scenario; these are Change Lease and Expiration Reminder.

Q. What happens if I perform a re-provision action on a virtual machine that is currently in a Planned Migration or Disaster Recovery state?

A. vCAC will re-provision the virtual machine in the normal manner, where the hostname and IP address (if assigned through vCAC) will be maintained. However, the SRM recovery plan will now fail if you attempt to re-protect the virtual machine back to the protected site as the original object being managed is replaced. It’s recommended that—for blueprints where SRM protection is a requirement—you disable the ‘Re-provision’ machine operation.


Gary Blake is a VMware Staff Solutions Architect & CTO Ambassador

Practical Tools from VMware Consultants: Mobility Policy, Horizon + Lync Architecture, and vCOps Dashboard

Our goal on the VMware Consulting blog is to share best practices that have delivered results for our customers, in hopes that they will help others be successful with VMware offerings.  Once in a while we like to highlight past posts that our readers have found particularly valuable. Last month, we published three such pieces — with great, practical advice to help you in your daily work. Just in case you missed them, we hope you find them useful. And if you’re already putting them to use, be sure to leave comments for our consulting authors. Feedback helps us bring you more of what you want to read!

How to Set Up a BYOD/Mobility Policy
By TJ Vatsa, Principal Architect, VMware Americas Professional Services Organization

Architecture Overview: Microsoft Lync with VMware Horizon View
By Ray Heffer, VCDX #122, VMware EUC Architect

Create a vCOps One-Click Cluster Capacity Dashboard, Part 2
By Sunny Dua, Senior Technology Consultant, VMware


Create a vCOps One-Click Cluster Capacity Dashboard Part 2

Sunny DuaBy Sunny Dua, Senior Technology Consultant at VMware

As I promised in my last post, Create a One-Click Cluster Capacity Dashboard Using vCOps, I am going to share the recipe for preparing dashboards similar to the “One-Click Cluster Capacity Dashboard,” which received a lot of appreciation from the Twitterati. A number of people  deployed the dashboard and within minutes they could showcase the capacity of their vSphere Clusters.

Now I want to take this one level deeper and tell you how you can create your own cool XMLs within vCOps Custom UI (included with Advanced & Enterprise Edition) to create the dashboard to showcase to your CxO, IT VP or the NOC team who are monitoring the virtual infrastructure. I call this the “behind the scenes” post because it will get into XML coding. Creating these XMLs is way easier than I thought, so go ahead, read on….

To begin, let’s have a look at the XML file I created for scoreboard interactions in Part 1 of this two post series. Here is how the file is structured and the details of the components that make up this file. Understanding this is critical.

 

One-Click Part 2 Image 1

Hint: Open this image on a separate page to get all the details.

Now if you have spent some time reading the details of the image above, the first question you will have is “Where can I find the adapterkindKey, resourcekindKey and the Metric attrkey to make my dream dashboard?”

adapterkindKey – This is the easiest one. If you want to see metrics from your vSphere environment, you will use VMWARE as the adapter kind. If you have collectors installed for third-party products, refer to their documentation for the adapter name.

resourcekindKey and attrkey – These keys are stored in the vCOps database. The procedure to access the database is defined in VMware KB – 2011714, but I have simplified it in the steps below.

To access the VCOps database and retrieve the resourcekindKey and attrkey

1. Open the following URL in your environment:
https:///vcops-custom/dbAccessQuery.action

2. When you see the vCOps DB Access Query page, run the following query. This will fetch the data you need. Note: Copy and paste the query starting at select and ending at ‘HostSystem’. (Ignore the asterisks.)

*********************************************************************************
select a.ADAPTER_KIND_ID, a.ADAPTER_KEY, b.RESKND_ID, b.RESKND_KEY, e.ATTRKEY_ID, e.ATTR_KEY
from AdapterKind a
inner join ResourceKind b on (b.ADAPTER_KIND_ID = a.ADAPTER_KIND_ID)
inner join AliveResource c on (c.RESKND_ID = b.RESKND_ID)
inner join ResourceAttributeKey d on (d.RESOURCE_ID = c.RESOURCE_ID)
inner join AttributeKey e on (e.ATTRKEY_ID = d.ATTRKEY_ID)

where a.ADAPTER_KEY = ‘VMWARE‘ or b.RESKND_KEY = ‘HostSystem

*********************************************************************************

If you are looking for keys related to an adapter other than VMware, change the values highlighted in blue in the query.

3. The query will give you all the data you need, in the following format. (The screenshot below is from my lab.)

One-Click Part 2 Image 2

Here, you will see the resourcekindKey and attrkey which will help you to create your own XML for the values you want to showcase for a particular resource. Once you have done that, you just need to import this XML into the default interactions location mentioned in my last post. Now you are ready for scoreboard interactions.

It’s that easy!

I hope you will use this recipe for good, and I would appreciate if you can share the XMLs you create with it. I am planning to host a repository on my blog to include some easily re-usable dashboards that can help those in the VMware Community who are using or planning to use the vCenter Operations Manager. As always, please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section.


This post originally appeared on Sunny Dua’s vXpress blog. Sunny is a senior technology consultant for VMware’s Professional Services Organization, focused on India and SAARC countries. Follow Sunny on Twitter @sunny_dua.

Create a One-Click Cluster Capacity Dashboard Using vCOps

Sunny DuaBy Sunny Dua, Senior Technology Consultant at VMware

It’s easy to set up a cluster capacity dashboard in just one click and I’ll show you how to do it with vCenter Operations Manager Custom Dashboards. In this two-part blog series, I’ll guide you through steps to get this dashboard installed in your environment and explain how to create the interaction XML.

Let’s take a look at the final dashboard in the screenshot below, the problems it will solve, and its features. Then we’ll take a closer look at the process of designing this dashboard and the related customizations you can do. DuaOCCCD1
Here is a quick summary and the features of this dashboard:

  • The list of clusters in the environment being monitored in your Virtual Infrastructure (left pane).
  • Once you select a given cluster, you will see the Capacity Overview of the cluster (right scoreboard widget).
  • The scoreboard gives you the summary of the cluster, consolidation ratios, capacity remaining, waste, and stress data.
  • Each score’s color designates VMware configuration maximums. (For example, if the number of hosts comes out to 33, the box will turn red as vSphere 5.x currently supports a 32-node ESXi Cluster. You have the option to define these thresholds while creating the XML—I’ll share this in a moment.)
  • This dashboard can help CXOs get details about the capacity of each cluster with just a click of a button. It can also easily help them make procurement decisions.
  • Using this dashboard helps IT teams quickly decide which clusters can be used for any new Virtual Machine demand from the business, etc.
  • Finally, large service providers can use this dashboard to keep tabs on the resource utilization and available capacity.

Download Files

The beauty behind this customization is that I can export this dashboard right from my vCOps instance and import it into any vCOps instance with a few steps–and it will work like a charm. You can successfully reuse this dashboard in your vCOps instance, if you have the vCOps advance or Enterprise edition, which includes a custom UI.

Download the Cluster-XML.xml file below to see all of the metrics to display in the scorecard on the right as soon as a cluster is selected on the left pane. In part two of this series, I will tell you how to write this file. The Cluster-Capacity Dashboard.xml file is just a simple export of the dashboard from the Custom UI.

You can do the same for any dashboard that does not have any dependencies for resource IDs (unique identity number given by vCOps to each of its inventory object). You would take a two-step approach to use these files to achieve the final result.

Files to download:

Cluster-XML.xml

Cluster-Capacity Dashboard.xml

Step-by-Step Instructions to Place the Cluster-XML.xml in a Specific Location of UI VM

  1. Use an SCP software to login to the UI VM using the root credentials. I am using WinSCP.
    Change the directory to the following location: /usr/lib/vmware-vcops/tomcat-enterprise/webapps/vcops-custom/WEB-INF/classes/resources/reskndmetrics
  2. Drag and drop the Cluster-XML.xml file from your system where you downloaded it to this directory as shown in the screenshot below.DuaOCCCD2
  3. Right click the target file, and then click on Properties to change the permission level to 644 (for read and execute rights) as shown below.DuaOCCCD3

Now that you’ve finished the first set of steps, let’s go through the second set of instructions.

Step-by-Step Instructions: Import Cluster-Capacity Dashboard.xml Dashboard in vCOps Custom UI

  1. Log into vCOps Custom UI using an ID with administrative privileges.
  2. Click the Import Option under the Dashboard Tools menu.
    DuaOCCCD4
  3. Browse to the location where you saved the Cluster-Capacity Dashboard.xml and click Import.
    DuaOCCCD3
  4. You’ll now see a dialog box indicating that your dashboard was successfully imported. Close the window and click the Dashboards Menu to find a new dashboard named “CLUSTER-WISE CAPACITY OVERVIEW”
    DuaOCCCD6
  5. Click this and you will now have see the dashboard I displayed at beginning of this post. It’s that simple! :-)After importing the dashboard, if you do not see the names of your cluster in the Resources Widget, you must edit the “Resources” Widget -> Select “Cluster Compute Resource” in the left pane and click OK. This will list all your clusters.

Stay tuned for part two of this article where I’ll provide steps to help create your own .XML files to build additional dashboards. This is useful for those who want a single pane to view the entire capacity of a Virtual Infrastructure.

Additional Notes and Resources

Lior Kamrat, who like myself is a part of VMware Consulting group, has a list of great list of vCOps resources available on a dedicated page of his blog called IMALLVIRTUAL.COM. I would highly recommend you bookmark the page if you are using, learning about, or want to become an expert on vCenter Operations Manager. He also has a blog series on One Click Capacity Planning Dashboards with another angle on capacity in your Virtual Datacenter. In addition, you can review other articles on vCOps on vXpress.


This post originally appeared on Sunny Dua’s vXpress blog. Sunny is a Senior Technology Consultant for VMware’s Professional Services Organization, focused on India and SAARC countries. Follow Sunny on Twitter @sunny_dua.

Are You Optimizing your SAP Virtualization?

If you are virtualizing an SAP environment running business-critical applications, chances are these questions will sound familiar: Am I optimizing my SAP virtualization for the maximum benefit? What measures should I take to avoid negative business impact when running SAP production workloads on the VMware virtualized platform?

Luckily, VMware Consulting Architect Girish Manmadkar recently shared his advice on this topic.

To make sure you are designing and sizing your infrastructure for optimum business benefit, Girish suggests two new questions to ask yourself, your IT organization, and your vendors.

1. How will this environment need to scale?

2. Am I sizing my environment to support 3-to-5 years of growth?

When you understand the needs outlined by these questions, you can then work with hardware vendors, as well as your VMware and SAP teams, to find the best solution.

From an operational standpoint, there are also efficiencies within the SAP environment once it is virtualized that you want to be sure to take advantage of.

1. Scaling out during the month-end and quarter-end processing is a snap compared to the hours it can take otherwise.

2. Products like vCenter Operations Manger help make sure your SAP basis admin and VMware admin are always on the same page, making it far faster and easier to troubleshoot the environment.

3. You’ll be able to provide the operations team with 24-hours monitoring of the entire SAP virtual infrastructure, allowing for a proactive approach to minimize or eliminate downtime.

Check out Girish’s video, above, for more details.


Girish Manmadkar is a veteran VMware SAP Virtualization Architect with extensive knowledge and hand-on experience with various SAP and VMware products, including various databases. He focuses on SAP migrations, architecture designs, and implementation, including disaster recovery.


4 Ways To Overcome Resistance to the Cloud

By Brett Parlier, Solutions Architect, VMware Professional Services

There’s a lot of excitement about cloud computing right now, but I also run into an equal amount of trepidation. In particular, networking pros are worried that increasingly advanced automation will soon put them out of a job.

This is just one of several common points of resistance to the big changes happening in IT. I want to talk about four of them and provide some advice on how to reframe the discussion for clients, colleagues, and possibly yourself.

1. You’re going to automate my job away!

I heard this a lot after the announcement of VMware’s NSX network virtualization platform in August. My response? That’s the same thing all the server guys said 10 years ago when virtualization came out. It just doesn’t happen. Continue reading

Badges? We Don’t See No Stinkin’ Badges!

By Jerad Forcier, Senior Consultant – Management, Security, Compliance, and Monitoring, VMware Professional Services

Here’s how to make sure your vCM Compliance Badge shows up in vCenter Operations

When I work on projects that integrate VMware vCenter Configuration Manager badges into the dashboard in vCenter Operations Management Suite, I often hear the same questions over and over. Whether you are doing the integration yourself or helping a client through the process, I hope this post will help answer some of your questions.

Let’s start with a little background: These two products use different methods for obtaining, storing, and retrieving information. The vCenter Operations Management Suite works by collecting several metrics related to utilization and performance from vCenter Server and stores them in a database. This data is displayed in user-friendly views, or “dashboards.”

The vCenter Configuration Manager (vCM) is an agent-based product that collects current configuration settings from virtual as well as physical machines. This configuration data is stored in a SQL database, and the views of this data are queried from the database using an SSRS reporting structure. Continue reading