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Tag Archives: Horizon 7

VMware Horizon 7: Instant Clone Pools Delete VMs on Restart

by Joe Graziano

One of the observed features of Instant clone pools is that when a VM is logged off it deletes the VM so that any changes are gone. This makes troubleshooting tricky and you cannot set the do not delete at refresh like you can with Full VM and Linked Clones.

What is a View admin to do? Thanks to the folks at VMware GSS we have an option, with a caveat.

You can go into the Adam Database through ADSIEDIT and change a setting so that the VM’s do not delete, allowing you to logoff and reboot them while retaining the VM’s settings.

The caveat* is that when you change this setting you cannot edit the provisioning details or other attributes of this pool. You will have to change it back to ‘deleteonuse’ in the ADAM ADSIEDIT before you can make changes.

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VMware Horizon 7 – Associate Instant Clone Virtual Machines

Matt_freyby Matt Frey

Being a field consultant affords me the opportunity to get in the nitty gritty with many of our customers. One of my favorite aspects of this role is helping customers address their business’s needs in a hands-on fashion. During one of my recent engagements, a customer asked, “How do I identify which parent VMs belong to which Instant Clone Desktops?” Since I’m sure that question will be asked by many others, I thought I would take some time to show how that process is carried out.
Horizon 7 - Associate IC VMs

 I hope that this article helps in shining light on the relationship between the various Instant Clone components. If your team needs additional resources I recommend you check out our Horizon Certification courses as well as the many Hands On Labs.

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Matt Frey is a Consultant in the End User Computing branch of Professional Services with over 15 years’ experience in the IT industry. He currently holds a VCP6-DTM and VCAP6-DTM and specializes in bringing enhanced value to customers by leveraging VMware’s strong EUC portfolio.

VMware Horizon 7 Instant Clones Best Practices

Dale CarterBy Dale Carter

Recently, I have been working with Instant Clones in my lab. Although I have found this easy to get up and running (for more information, see my blog here), it hasn’t been easy to find best practices around configuring Instant Clones, as they are so new.

I reached out to the engineering team, and they provided me with the following best practices for using Instant Clones in VMware Horizon 7.0.2.

Check OS Support for Instant Clones

The following table shows what desktop operating systems are supported when using Instant Clones.

Guest Operating System Version Edition Service Pack
Windows 10 64-Bit and 32-Bit Enterprise None
Windows 7 64-Bit and 32-Bit Enterprise and Professional SP1

For more information, see the architecture planning guide.

Remote Monitor Limitations

If you use Instant Clone desktop pools, the maximum number of monitors that you can use to display a remote desktop is two, with a resolution of up to 2560 X 1600. If your users require more monitors or a higher resolution, I recommend using a Linked Clone desktop pools for these users.

For more information, see the architecture planning guide.

Instant Clones on vSAN

When running Instant Clones on vSAN it is recommended to the R5 configuration that will have the following settings

Name Checksum Rain Level Duplication and Compression Client Cache Sparse Swap
R5 Yes 5 No Enabled Disabled

For more information, see the VMware Horizon 7 on VMware Virtual SAN 6.2 All-Flash, Reference Architecture.

Unsupported Features when using Instant Clones

The following features are currently not supported when using Instant Clones.

View Persona Management

The View Persona Management feature is not supported with Instant Clones. I recommend the User Environment Manager for managing the user’s environment settings.

For more information, see the architecture planning guide.

3D Graphics Features

The software and hardware accelerated graphics features available with the Blast Extreme or PCoIP display protocol are currently not supported with Instant Clones desktops. If your users require this feature, I recommend you use a Linked Clone desktop for them.

For more information, see the architecture planning guide.

Virtual Volumes

VMware vSphere Virtual Volumes Datastores are currently not supported for Instant clone desktop pools. For Instant Clone desktop pools, you can use other storage options, such as VMware Virtual SAN.

For more information, see the architecture planning guide.

Persistent User Disk

Instant Clone pools do not support the creation of a persistent virtual disk. If you have a requirement to store a user’s profile and application data on a separate disk, you can use the writeable disk feature of VMware App Volumes to store this data. The App Volumes writeable volume can also be used to store user installed applications.

For more information, see the architecture planning guide.

Disposable Virtual Disk

Instant Clone pools do not support configuration of a separate, disposable virtual disk for storing the guest operating system’s paging and temp files. Each time a user logs out of an instant clone desktop, Horizon View automatically deletes the clone and provisions and powers on another instant clone based on the latest OS image available for the pool. Any guest operating systems paging and temp files are automatically deleted during the logo operation.

For more information, see the architecture planning guide.

Hopefully, this information will help you configure Instant Clones in your environment. I would like to thank the VMware Engineering team for helping me put this information together.


Dale Carter is a Senior Solutions Architect and member of the CTO Ambassadors. Dale focuses in the End User Compute space, where Dale has become a subject matter expert in a number of the VMware products. Dale has more than 20 years’ experience working in IT having started his career in Northern England before moving the Spain and finally the USA. Dale currently holds a number of certifications including VCP-DV, VCP-DT, VCAP-DTD and VCAP-DTA. For more blog post from Dale visit his website athttp://vdelboysview.com

Configuring VMware Identity Manager and VMware Horizon 7 Cloud Pod Architecture

Dale CarterBy Dale Carter

With the release of VMware Horizon® 7 and VMware Identity Manager™ 2.6, it is now possible to configure VMware Identity Manager to work with Horizon Cloud Pod Architecture when deploying your desktop and application pools over multiple data centers or locations.

Using VMware Identity Manager in front of your VMware Horizon deployments that are using Cloud Pod Architecture makes it much easier for users to get access to their desktops and applications. The user has just one place to connect to, and they will be able to see all of their available desktops and applications. Identity Manager will direct the user to the application hosted in the best datacenter for their location. This can also include SaaS applications as well as the applications that are available through VMware Horizon 7.

The following instructions show you how to configure VMware Identity Manager to work with VMware Horizon 7 when using Cloud Pod Architecture.

Configure view on the first connector

  1. From the VMware Identity Manager Admin Portal select Catalog, Managed Desktop Appliances, View Application.

DCarter_View Application

  1. Choose the first Identity Manager Connector. This will redirect you to the connector View setup page.
  2. Select the check box to enable View Pools. Add the correct information to the first View Pod, and click Save.

DCarter_View Pools

  1. If there is an Invalid SSL Cert warning, click the warning and Accept.

DCarter_Invalid SSL Cert

  1. Scroll down the page and select Add View Pool.

DCarter_Add View Pool

  1. Add the correct information to the first View Pod and click Save.

DCarter_View Pod

  1. If there is an Invalid SSL Cert warning, click the warning and Accept.
  2. You will now see both View Pods configured for this connector.

DCarter_Remove View Pod

  1. Scroll to the top of the page.
  2. Select Federation.
  3. Check the Enable CPA Federation check box. Fill out the correct information, and add all of the Pods within the Federation.
    DCarter_View Pools Federation
  4. Click Save.
  5. From the Pods and Sync tab, click Sync Now.

DCarter_View Pool Sync

Configure view on all other connectors

  1. From the VMware Identity Manager Admin Portal, select Catalog, Managed Desktop Appliances, View Application.
  2. Select the next connector and follow the instructions above.
  3. Do this for every connector.

Configure network ranges

Once the VMware Horizon View setup is complete, you will need to configure Network Ranges.

  1. From the Identity Manager Admin page, select the Identity & Access Management Tab and click Setup.
  2. Select Network Ranges and click Add Network Range.

DCarter_Add Network Range

  1. Enter the required information and click Save.

DCarter_Add Network Range View Site

  1. This will need to be repeated for all network ranges, usually for each site and external access.

Dale is a Senior Solutions Architect and member of the CTO Ambassadors. Dale focuses in the End User Compute space, where Dale has become a subject matter expert in a number of the VMware products. Dale has more than 20 years’ experience working in IT having started his career in Northern England before moving the Spain and finally the USA. Dale currently holds a number of certifications including VCP-DV, VCP-DT, VCAP-DTD and VCAP-DTA. For more blog post from Dale visit his website at http://vdelboysview.com

EUC Design Series: Horizon 7 Strategy for Desktop Evolution to IoT Revolution

TJBy TJ Vatsa

Introduction

Mobility and end-user computing (EUC) are evolving at a very rapid pace. With the recent announcements made by VMware around Horizon 7 it becomes all the more important to recalibrate and remap the emerging innovation trends to your existing enterprise EUC and application rationalization strategies. For business and IT leaders, burning questions emerge:

  • “What are these EUC innovations leading to, and why should it matter to my organization?”
  • “What is the end-user desktop in the EUC realm evolving into, and are these innovations a precursor to an IoT (Internet of Things) revolution?”
  • “What outcomes might we expect if we were to adopt these innovations in our organizations?”
  • “How do we need to restructure our existing EUC/mobility team to fully leverage the mobility evolution?”

Now there are enough questions to get your creative juices flowing! Let’s dive right in.

The What

Desktop virtualization revolutionized how end-user desktops with their applications and data were securely managed within the guard rails of a secure data center. These were essentially Generation1 (Gen1) desktops that were persistent (AKA full clone) desktops within a virtual machine (VM) container. While the benefit was mainly secure encapsulation within a data center, the downside was cumbersome provisioning with a bloated storage footprint. For instance, if you had one persistent desktop with a 50 GB base image and 100 users, you would be looking at 5,000 GB—or 5 TB—of storage. In an enterprise where we have thousands of users with unique operating system and application requirements, the infrastructure capital expenditures (CAPEX) and the associated operational expenditures (OPEX) would be through the roof.

The preceding scenario was solved by the Generation2 (Gen2) virtual desktops, which were classified as non-persistent (AKA linked clone) desktops. Gen2 desktops relied on a parent base-image (AKA a replica), and the resulting linked clones referenced this replica for all read operations, and had delta disks to store any individual writes. These desktops benefited from faster process automation using a Composer server (AKA desktop provisioning) that generated linked clones referencing a base replica image. This resulted in a significant reduction in the storage footprint and faster desktop provisioning times. This also aided in reducing the CAPEX and OPEX levels incurred in Gen1 desktops. However, the downside of desktop boot-up times was still not fully resolved because they are dependent on the storage media being used. Boot-up times were faster with flash storage and comparatively slower with spinning media storage. The OPEX associated with application management was still not fully resolved despite application virtualization technologies offered by various vendors. It still required management of multiple patches for desktop images and applications.

The panacea offered by the new Horizon 7 has accelerated the virtual desktop evolution to Generation3 (Gen3) desktops. Evolution to Gen3 results in just-in-time desktops and application stack delivery. This means you only have to patch the desktop once, clone it with its running state, and dynamically attach the application stack using VMware’s App Volumes. Gen3 virtual desktops from VMware have the benefits of Gen2 desktops, but without the operational overhead, resulting in reduced CAPEX and OPEX. Here is an infographic detailing the evolution:

TVatsa_Clone Desktop VM

Gen3 desktops pave the way for a Generation4+ (Gen4+) mobility platform that leverages VMware’s Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) platform and the EUC platform into Workspace ONE, capable of tapping into all of the possibilities of mobility-enabled IoT solutions. The potential generated by these solutions is capable of being tapped across various vertical industries—healthcare, financial, retail, education, manufacturing, government and consumer packaged goods—creating an IoT revolution in days to come.

The Why

The innovations listed in the preceding section have the potential of transforming an enterprise’s business, IT and financial outcomes. The metrics to quantify these outcomes are best measured in the resulting CAPEX and OPEX reductions. The reduction in these expenditures not only fosters business agility as in accelerated M&A, but also enhances an organization’s workforce efficiency. The proof is in the pudding. Here is a sample snapshot of the outcomes from a healthcare customer:

TVatsa_Healthcare Customer Diagram

The How

While the mobility evolution and its leap to an IoT revolution is imminent with the promise of anticipated outcomes as mentioned earlier, the question still lingers: How do you align the roles within your organization to ride the wave of mobility transformation?

Here is a sample representation of the recommended roles for an enterprise mobility center of excellence (COE):

TVatsa_COE

Here is the description of field recommendations in terms of mandatory and recommended roles for an enterprise EUC/mobility transformation:

TVatsa_Proposed Org Roles

Conclusion

Given the rate at which enterprise mobility is evolving towards IoT, it is only a matter of time when every facet of our lives, from our work to home environments, will be fully transformed by this tectonic mobility driven IoT transformation. VMware’s mobility product portfolio, in combination with VMware’s experienced Professional Services Organization (PSO), can help you transform your enterprise onward in this revolutionary journey. VMware is ever-ready to be your trusted partner in this “DARE” endeavor. Until next time, go VMware!


TJ Vatsa is a principal architect and member of CTO Ambassadors at VMware representing the Professional Services organization. He has worked at VMware for more than five years and has more than 20 years of experience in the IT industry. During this time he has focused on enterprise architecture and applied his extensive experience in professional services and R&D to cloud computing, VDI infrastructure, SOA architecture planning and implementation, functional/solution architecture, enterprise data services and technical project management.