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Tag Archives: Applications

VMware App Volumes Multi-vCenter and Multi-Site Deployments

By Dale Carter

With the release of VMware App Volumes 2.9 comes one of the most requested features so far: multi-vCenter support. With multi-vCenter support it is now possible to manage virtual desktops and AppStacks from multiple vCenter instances within the same App Volume Manager.

The following graphic shows how this works:

DCarter App Volumes

With this new feature App Volumes can now be used to support the Horizon Block and Pod architecture with just one App Volumes manager, or cluster of managers.

Now that we can support multi-vCenters, I started to wonder if this new capability could be leveraged across multiple sites to help support multiple site deployments.

After speaking with the App Volumes Product Manager, I am happy to confirm that, “Yes,” you can use this new feature to support multi-site deployments – as long as you are using the supported SQL database.

The architecture for this type of deployment would look like this:

DCarter App Volumes 2

 

I would recommend that App Volumes Managers at each site be clustered. Read the following blog to learn how to cluster App Volumes Managers: http://blogs.vmware.com/consulting/2015/02/vmware-appvolumes-f5.html

Although 2.9 is just a point release, this is one of the biggest features added so far for multi-vCenter support.

To add a second―or more―vCenter instance to App Volumes, follow these simple steps:

  1. Login to the App Volumes Manager
  2. Select Configuration, then Machine Manager, and then click Add Machine Manager
    DCarter App Volumes 3
  3. Enter the vCenter information and click Save.
    DCarter App Volumes 4
  4. Follow these steps for each vCenter instance you want to add.

Dale is a Senior Solutions Architect and member of the CTO Ambassadors. Dale focuses in the End User Compute space, where Dale has become a subject matter expert in a number of the VMware products. Dale has more than 20 years experience working in IT having started his career in Northern England before moving the Spain and finally the USA. Dale currently hold a number of certifications including VCP-DV, VCP-DT, VCAP-DTD and VCAP-DTA.

For updates you can follow Dale on twitter @vDelboy

Application Delivery Strategy: A Key Piece in the VDI Design Puzzle

By Michael Bradley and Hans Bader

Let’s face it: applications are the bane of a desktop administrator’s existence. It seems there is always something that makes the installation and management of an application difficult and challenging. Whether it’s a long list of confusing and conflicting requirements or a series of software and hardware incompatibilities, management of applications is one of the more difficult aspects of an administrator’s job.

It’s not surprising that application delivery and management is one of the key areas that often gets overlooked when planning and deploying a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), such as VMware’s Horizon View 6. This often-overlooked aspect is a common pitfall hindering many VDI implementations. A great deal of work and effort goes into ensuring that desktop images are optimized, the correct corporate security settings are applied to the operating system, the underlying architecture is built to scale appropriately, and the guaranteed end-user performance is acceptable. These are all important goals that require attention, but the application delivery strategy is frequently missed, forgotten, or even ignored.

Before we go further, let’s take a moment to define application delivery. A long time ago in a cube farm far, far away, application delivery was all about getting the applications installed on the desktop. But with the emergence of new technologies the definition has evolved. Software application delivery is no longer solely about the installation; it has taken on a broader meaning. In today’s end-user environment, application delivery is more about providing the end-user with access to the applications they need. In today’s modern enterprise, end-user access can come in many different forms. Some of the most common examples are:

  • Installing applications directly on the virtual desktop, either manually or by using software such as Microsoft SCCM.
  • Application virtualization using VMware ThinApp or Microsoft’s App-V.
  • Delivering the applications to the desktop using technologies such as VMware App Volumes or Liquidware Labs’ FlexApp.
  • Application presentation using RDS Hosted Applications in VMware Horizon 6.

All these examples are application delivery mechanisms. Each one can solve a different application deployment problem, and each can be used alone or in conjunction with a complimentary one. For example, using App Volumes to delivery ThinApps.

An application delivery strategy should be an integral part of your VDI design; it is just as crucial as the physical infrastructure, like storage, networking, processing and the virtual infrastructure. It is perfectly alright to have a top-notch VDI, but if you can’t deliver new and existing applications to your end-users in a fast and efficient manner, you might be spinning your bits and bytes. Your end-users need applications delivered efficiently and quickly, or the VDI project becomes a bottleneck. The prime factor to remember about VDI is it forces you to change the way you operate. Features―such as VMware’s Linked Clone technology―can change the application delivery paradigm that many desktop administrators have grown accustomed to in a physical PC world. Let’s face it: how effective is it to push and install applications to linked clone desktops every time a desktop refreshes or recomposes?

To this end, if an application delivery strategy is so important, why is it often missed or ignored? There are three primary reasons for this:

  • First, it is simply forgotten, or the VDI designers simply don’t realize they need to consider it as part of the design.
  • Second, application delivery is often considered too big of a challenge, and no one wants to tackle it when they’re already facing tight deadlines on a VDI project.
  • Third, and probably most commonly heard in enterprise environments, is there is already a mechanism in place for application delivery for physical PCs, so it is assumed that what exists will suffice.

Once the need for an application delivery strategy is established, you need to determine what goes into one. First, you need to consider all tiers of your applications: tier one, tier two, tier-n. With that be sure to identify which are most common. Determine which applications need to be provided to all end-users versus which ones go to just a small subset. That will help determine what could be installed in the base image, as opposed to being delivered by some other mechanism. For instance, Microsoft Office may be an application that would be included in the base image for all users, but a limited use accounting package may only be required for the accounting team, and therefore delivered another way.

Next, consider the delivery mechanism for your virtual desktops. Are they all full virtual machine desktops – or linked clone desktops? Determining which type you are using will play a major part in what your application delivery strategy looks like. If you are using all full virtual machine desktops―which deserves serious consideration―then you could effectively continue to use the existing application delivery strategy you use for physical PCs. But using linked clones could cause your existing application delivery strategy to become a bottleneck.

Then, you need to consider what technology will work best for you and your applications. Will application virtualization such as ThinApp be a suitable mechanism? Or, perhaps using RDS Hosted Applications in Horizon 6 is a more viable option for application delivery. You may even find the best option is a combination of technologies. You should take time to evaluate the pros and cons of each option to ensure the needs of your end-users are met ‒ and with efficiency. One question you should ask is, “Do my end-users have the ability to install their own applications?” If the answer is “yes,” you need to ensure you either change corporate policy or select a technology that supports user-installed applications. Keep in mind that an application delivery strategy can vary for different types of users.

Finally, you should consider how to handle one-off situations. There will always be the one user, or a small group of users, who require a specialized application that falls outside the realm of your standard application delivery mechanisms. Determining how to address those instances are rare but inevitable, but as a desktop administrator, it will help you respond quickly to the needs of your end-users.

A good VDI implementation is only successful if the end-users can perform their assigned tasks. Nine times out of ten, that requires access to applications. Ensuring you have a strategy in place to ensure delivery of the right applications to the right end-users is vital to the success of any VDI implementation.


Michael Bradley

Michael Bradley, a VMware Senior Solutions Architect specializing in the EUC space, has worked in IT for almost 20 years. He is also a VCP5-DCV, VCAP4-DCD, VCP4-DT, VCP5-DT, and VCAP-DTD, as well as an Airwatch Enterprise Mobility Associate.

 

Hans Bader

Hans Bader Consulting Architect, VMware EUC. Hans has over 20 years of IT experience and joined VMware in 2009. With a focus on helping organizations being operationally ready, he works with customers to avoid common mistakes.  He is a strong advocate for proactive load testing of environment before allowing users access.  Hans has won numerous consulting awards within VMware.

App Volumes AppStacks vs. Writable Volumes

By Dale Carter, Senior Solutions Architect, End-User Computing

With the release of VMware App Volumes I wanted to take the time to explain the difference between AppStacks and Writable Volumes, and how the two need to be designed as you start to deploy App Volumes.

The graphic below shows the traditional way to manage your Windows desktop, as well as the way things have changed with App Volumes and the introduction of “Just-in-time” apps.

DCarter AppVolumes v Writable Volumes 1

 

So what are the differences between AppStacks and Writable Volumes?

AppStacks

An AppStack is a virtual disk that contains one or more applications that can be assigned to a user as a read-only disk. A user can have one or many AppStacks assigned to them depending on how the IT administrator manages the applications.

When designing for AppStacks it should be noted that an AppStack is deployed in a one-to-many configuration. This means that at any one time an AppStack could be connected to one or hundreds of users.

DCarter AppVolumes v Writable Volumes 2

 

When designing storage for an AppStack it should also be noted that App Volumes do not change the IOPS required for an application, but it does consolidate the IOPS to a single virtual disk. So like any other virtual desktop technology it is critical to know your applications and their requirements; it is recommended to do an application assessment before moving to a large-scale deployment. Lakeside Software and Liquidware Labs both publish software for doing application assessments.

For example, if you know that on average the applications being moved to an AppStack use 10 IOPS, and that the AppStack has 100 users connected to it, you will require 1,000 IOPS average (IOPS pre-user x number of users) to support that AppStack; you can see it is key to designing your storage correctly for AppStacks.

In large-scale deployments it may be recommended to create copies of AppStacks and place them across storage LUNs, and assign a subset of users to each AppStack for best performance.

DCarter AppVolumes v Writable Volumes 3

 

Writable Volumes

Like AppStacks, a Writable Volume is also a virtual disk, but unlike AppStacks a Writable Volume is configured in a one-to-one configuration, and each user has their own assigned Writeable Volume.

DCarter AppVolumes v Writable Volumes 4

 

When an IT administrator assigns a Writable Volume to a user, the first thing the IT administrator will need to decide is what type of data the user will be able to store in the Writable Volumes. There are three choices :

  • User Profile Data Only
  • User Installed Applications Only
  • Both Profile Data and User Installed Applications

It should be noted that App Volumes are not a Profile Management tool, but can be used alongside any currently used User-Environment Management tool.

When designing for Writable Volumes, the storage requirement will be different than it is when designing for AppStacks. Where an AppStack will require all Read I/O, a Writable Volume will require both Read and Write I/O. The IOPS for a Writable Volume will also vary per user depending on the individual user and how they use their data; it will also vary depending on the type of data the IT administrator allows the user to store in their Writable Volume.

IT administrators should monitor their users and how they access their Writable Volume; this will help them manage how many Writable Volumes can be configured on a single storage LUN.

Hopefully this blog helps describe the differences between AppStacks and Writable Volumes, and the differences that should be taken into consideration when designing for each.

I would like to thank Stephane Asselin for his input on this blog.


Dale is a Senior Solutions Architect and member of the CTO Ambassadors. Dale focuses in the End User Compute space, where Dale has become a subject matter expert in a number of the VMware products. Dale has more than 20 years experience working in IT having started his career in Northern England before moving the Spain and finally the USA. Dale currently hold a number of certifications including VCP-DV, VCP-DT, VCAP-DTD and VCAP-DTA.

For updates you can follow Dale on twitter @vDelboy

App Volumes AppStack Creation

Dale CarterBy Dale Carter, Senior Solutions Architect, End-User Computing

VMware App Volumes provide just-in-time application delivery to virtualized desktop environments. With this real-time application delivery system, applications are delivered to virtual desktops through VMDK virtual disks, without modifying the VM or applications themselves. Applications can be scaled out with superior performance, at lower costs, and without compromising end-user experience.

In this blog post I will show you how easy it is to create a VMware App Volumes AppStack and how that AppStack can then be easily deployed to up to hundreds of users

When configuring App Volumes with VMware Horizon View an App Volumes AppStack is a read-only VMDK file that is added to a user’s virtual machine, and then the App Volumes Agent merges the two or more VMDK files so the Microsoft Windows operating system sees the files as just one drive. This way the applications look to the Windows OS as if they are natively installed and not on a separate disk.

To create an App Volumes AppStack follow these simple steps.

  1. Log in to the App Volumes Manager Web interface.
  2. Click Volumes.
    DCarter Volumes
  3. Click Create AppStack.
    DCarter AppStack
  4. Give the AppStack a name. Choose the storage location and give it a description (optional). Then click Create.
    DCarter Create AppStack
  5. Choose to either Perform in the background or Wait for completion and click Create.
    DCarter Create
  6. vCenter will now create a new VMDK for the AppStack to use.
  7. Once vCenter finishes creating the VMDK the AppStack will show up as Un-provisioned. Click the + sign.
    DCarter
  8. Click Provision
    .
    DCarter Provision
  9. Search for the desktop that will be used to install the software. Select the Desktop and click Provision.
    DCarter Provision AppStack
  10. Click Start Provisioning.
    DCarter Start Provisioning
  11.  vCenter will now attach the VMDK to the desktop.
  12. Open the desktop that will be used for provisioning the new software. You will see the following message: DO NOT click OK. You will click OK after the install of the software.
    DCarter Provisioning Mode
  13. Install the software on the desktop. This can be just one application or a number of applications. If reboots are required between installs that is OK. App Volumes will remember where you are after the install.
  14. Once all of the software has been installed click OK.
    DCarter Install
  15. Click Yes to confirm and reboot.
    DCarter Reboot
  16. Click OK.
    DCarter 2
  17. The desktop will now reboot. After the reboot you must log back in to the desktop.
  18. After you log in you must click OK. This will reconfigure the VMDK on the desktop.
    DCarter Provisioning Successful
  19. You can now connect to the App Volumes Manager Web interface and see that the AppStack is ready to be assigned.
    DCarter App Volumes Manager

Once you have created the AppStack you can assign the AppStack to an Active Directory object. This could be a user, computer or user group.

To assign an AppStack to a user, computer or user group, follow these simple steps.

  1. Log in to the App Volumes Manager Web interface.
  2. Click Volumes.
    DCarter Volumes Dashboard
  3. Click the + sign by the AppStack you want to assign.
  4. Click Assign.
    DCarter Assign
  5. Search for the Active Director object. Select the user, computer, OU or user group to assign the AppStack to. Click Assign.
    DCarter Assign Dashboard
  6. Choose either to assign the AppStack at the next login or immediately, and click Assign.
    DCarter Active Director
  7. The users will now have the AppStack assigned to them and will be able to launch the applications as they would any normal application.
    DCarter AppStack Assign

By following these simple steps you will be able to quickly create an AppStack and simply deploy that AppStack to your users.


Dale is a Senior Solutions Architect and member of the CTO Ambassadors. Dale focuses in the End User Compute space, where Dale has become a subject matter expert in a number of the VMware products. Dale has more than 20 years experience working in IT having started his career in Northern England before moving the Spain and finally the USA. Dale currently hold a number of certifications including VCP-DV, VCP-DT, VCAP-DTD and VCAP-DTA.

For updates you can follow Dale on twitter @vDelboy