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Category Archives: How-to

VMware User Environment Manager and ADMX Settings

JeffSmallby Jeffrey Davidson

In this blog entry, I will walk through how to configure ADMX settings within the VMware® User Environment Manager™ Management Console. Additionally, I will discuss how User Environment Manager ADMX settings work together with existing Group Policy configurations.

In this example, I will be setting Google Chrome as the default browser using the ADMX settings.

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Supporting Always On Availability Groups (SQL Server) with App Volumes

Ma_Mark2By Mark Ma

With the recent release of App Volumes 2.12, we officially support Microsoft SQL Server Always On Availability Groups.

SQL Always On Availability Groups is a great way to provide high availability and disaster recovery because live copies of your databases reside on secondary servers. By integrating SQL Always On with App Volumes, we ensure the most popular application layering product can be enjoyed by users in any situation.

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vRO Architecture Considerations When Digitally Signing Packages

Spas KaloferovBy Spas Kaloferov

In this blog post we will take a look at how digitally signing packages in VMware vRealize® Orchestrator™ (vRO) may affect the way you deploy vRO in your environment.

In some use cases, digitally signing workflow packages may affect your vRO architecture and deployment. Let’s consider a few examples.

Use Case 1 (Single Digital Signature Issuer)

Let’s say you have vRO ServerA and vRO ServerB in your environment. You’ve performed the steps outlined in How to Change the Package Signing Certificate of a vRO Appliance (SKKB1029) to change the PSC on vRO ServerA , export the keystore, and import it on vRO ServerB. This will allow the following:

  • vRO ServerA can digitally sign workflow packages, and vRO ServerB can read packages digitally signed by vRO ServerA.
  • vRO ServerB can digitally sign workflow packages, and vRO ServerA can read packages digitally signed by vRO ServerB.

Now what happens when you add vRO ServerC?

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Securing Your PowerShell Execution and Password in VMware vRealize Orchestrator

Spas Kaloferovby Spas Kaloferov

In this blog post we will look at how to secure your end-to-end PowerShell Execution from VMware vRealize® Orchestrator™ (vRO)—including how not to show passwords when using the Credential Security Support Provider (CredSSP) protocol in a double-hop authentication scenario.

Let’s look at a few common use cases regarding the configuration of vRO, the PowerShell host, the Windows Remote Management (WinRM) protocol, and the PowerShell script/command, and how we can best secure all of them.

Web Services (WS)-Management encrypts all traffic by default, and this is controlled by the AllowUnencrypted client and server WinRM configuration parameter—even if you only work with HTTP (the default configuration) and not with HTTPS. Prior to Windows Server 2003 R2, WinRM in an HTTP session was not encrypted.

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How to Configure vRealize Orchestrator to Use SSL to Connect to a SQL Server Database

Spas Kaloferovby Spas Kaloferov

Microsoft® SQL Server® can use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to encrypt data that is transmitted across a network between an instance of SQL Server and a client application.

SSL can be used for server validation when a client connection requests encryption. If the instance of SQL Server is running on a computer that has been assigned a certificate from a public certification authority, identity of the computer and the instance of SQL Server is vouched for by the chain of certificates that lead to the trusted root authority. Such server validation requires that the computer on which the client application is running be configured to trust the root authority of the certificate that is used by the server.

For the purposes of this article, the client application that will be configured with an encrypted connection to the database is VMware® vRealize® Orchestrator™. I will show you how to configure vRealize Orchestrator Appliance™ to use an SSL connection when communicating with a Microsoft SQL Server database.

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How to Add a Linux Machine as PowerShell Host in vRO

By Spas Kaloferov

Introduction

In this article we will look into the alpha version of Microsoft Windows PowerShell v6 for both Linux and Microsoft Windows. We will show how to execute PowerShell commands between Linux , Windows, and VMware vRealize Orchestrator (vRO):

  • Linux to Windows
  • Windows to Linux
  • Linux to Linux
  • vRO to Linux

We will also show how to add a Linux PowerShell (PSHost) in vRO.

Currently, the alpha version of PowerShell v6 does not support the PSCredential object, so we cannot use the Invoke-Command command to programmatically pass credentials and execute commands from vRO, through a Linux PSHost, to other Linux machines, or Windows machines. Conversely, we cannot execute from vRO –> through a Windows PSHost –> to Linux Machines.

To see how we used the Invoke-Command method to do this, see my blog Using CredSSP with the vCO PowerShell Plugin (SKKB1002).

In addition to not supporting the PSCredential object, the alpha version doesn’t support WinRM. WinRM is Microsoft’s implementation of the WS-Management protocol, a standard Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)-based, firewall-friendly protocol that enables hardware and operating systems from different vendors to interoperate. Therefore, when adding a Linux machine as a PowerShell host in vRO, we will be using SSH instead of WinRM as the protocol of choice.

The PowerShell v6 RTM version is expected to support WinRM, so we will be able to add the Linux PSHost with WinRM, and not SSH.

So, let’s get started.

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The Anatomy of an Instant Clone

By Travis Wood

If you’ve used Horizon View over the last few years, then you most likely have come across linked clones. Linked clones use a parent image, called a “replica,” that serves read requests to multiple virtual machines (VMs), and the writes in each desktop are captured on their own delta disk. Replicas can also be used to change desktop update methodologies; instead of updating every desktop, you can update the parent image and recompose the rest of the desktops.

Horizon 7 has introduced a new method of provisioning with Instant Clones. Instant Clones are similar to linked clones in that all desktops read from a replica disk and write to their own disk, but Instant Clone takes it one step further by doing the same thing with memory. Instant Clones utilize a new feature of vSphere 6 where desktop VMs are forked (that is, Instant Clones are created) off a running VM—instead of cloning a powered-off VM—which provides savings for provisioning, updates, and memory utilization.

Golden Image

With Instant Clones you start with your golden image, in a way that is similar to linked clones. The golden image is the VM you install the operating system on, then join to the domain, and install user applications on; you follow the same OS optimizations procedures you would use for Instant Clones.

When you’re done, release its IP address, shut it down, and create a snapshot. Now you are ready to create your Instant Clone desktop pool. This VM should have VM Tools installed, along with the Horizon Agent with the Instant Clone module. It is NOT possible to have the Instant Clone and Composer modules co-installed, so you will always need different snapshots if using Instant Clones and linked clones from the same golden image. Reservations can be set on the golden image and they will be copied to the Instant Clones, reducing the size of the VSwap file. It is important to note that the golden image must be on storage that’s accessible to the host you are creating your Instant Clone desktop pool on.

Template

When you create your pool, Horizon will create a template. A template is a linked clone from your golden image, created on the same datastore as the golden image. It will have the name cp-template, and will be in the folder ClonePrepInternalTemplateFolder. Template disk usage is quite small, about 60 MB. There will be an initial power-on after the template is created, but it will then shut off.

TWood_Horizon Template

Replica

Next, Horizon will create a replica, which is the same as a Linked Clone replica. It is a thin-provisioned, full clone of the template VM. This will serve as the common read disk for all of your Instant Clones, so it can be tiered onto appropriate storage through the Horizon Administrator console, the same way it is done with Linked Clones. Of course, if you are using VSAN, there is only one datastore, so tiering is done automatically. Horizon will also create a CBRC Digest file for the replica. The replica will be call cp-replica-GUID and will be in the folder ClonePrepReplicaVmFolder. The disk usage of the replica will be depend on how big your Gold Master is, but remember, it’s thin provisioned and not powered on, so you will not have VSwap functionality.

TWood_Horizon Replica

Parent

Horizon will now create the final copy of the original VM, called a parent, which will be used to fork the running VMs. The parent is created on every host in the cluster; remember, we are forking running VMs here, so every host needs to have a running VM. These will be placed on the same datastore as the desktop VMs, where there will be one per host per datastore. Because these are powered on, they have a VSwap file the size of the allocated vMEM. In addition, there will be a small delta disk to capture the writes booting the parent VM and the VMX Overhead VSwap file, but this—and the sum of the other disks—is relatively small, at about 500 MB. These will be placed in ClonePrepReplicaVmFolder.

TWood_Horizon Parent

Something you’ll notice with the parent VM is that it will use 100% of its allocated memory, causing a vCenter alarm.

TWood_vCenter Alarm

TWood_Virtual Machine Error

Instant Clones

OK! At this point, we are finally ready to fork! Horizon will create the Instant Clones based on the provisioning settings, which can be upfront or on-demand. Instant Clones will have a VSwap file equal to the size of the vMEM—minus any reservations set on the Gold Master, plus a differencing disk.

The amount of growth for the differencing disk will depend on how much is written to the local VM during the user’s session, but it is deleted on logout. When running View Planner tests, this can grow to about 500 MB, which is the same as when using View Planner for Linked Clones. The provisioning of Instant Clones will be fast! You’ll see much lower resource utilization of your vCenter Server and less IO on your disk subsystem because there is no boot storm from the VMs powering on.

TWood_vCenter Server

Conclusion

Instant Clones are a great new feature in Horizon 7 that take the concept of Linked Clones one step further. They bring the advantages of:

  • Reducing boot storms
  • Decreasing provisioning times
  • Decreasing change windows
  • Bringing savings to storage utilization

Instant Clones introduce a number of new objects: replicas, parents, and templates. It is important to understand not only how these are structured, but also their interrelationships, in order to plan your environment accordingly.


Travis is a Principal Architect in the Global Technology & Professional Services team, specializing in End User Computing.  He is also a member of the CTO Ambassadors program which connects the global field with R&D and engineering.

How to Change the Package Signing Certificate of a vRealize Orchestrator Appliance (7.0.1)

 

By Spas Kaloferov

In this post, we will take a look at how to change the Package Signing Certificate (PSC) in a vRealize Orchestrator appliance.

To change the PSC, let’s review a few steps first:

ŸIssue a certificate to meet the company’s requirements. The certificate must have:

  • ŸDigital Signature and Key Encipherment Key Usage attributes
  • ŸServer Authentication Extended Key Usage attribute
  • ŸAssurance that the certificate has a private key

ŸUse the keytool to:

  • ŸCreate new keystore; the keystore type must be JCEKS.
  • ŸImport the certificate into the keystore.
  • ŸChange the alias of the certificate to _dunesrsa_alias_.
  • ŸGenerate a Security Key and place it in the keystore.
  • ŸChange the alias of the Security Key to _dunessk_alias_.

ŸUse the Control Center interface to:

  • Ÿ Import the keystore you created.
  • Ÿ Restart the Orchestrator server.

Here is a screenshot of the original PSC certificate:

SKaloferov_PSC Certificate

Changing the Package Signing Certificate

First, you must obtain a PFX Certificate Package (containing your PSC Certificate) issued from the Certificate Authority (CA).

SKaloferov_Package Signing Certificate

SKaloferov_Package Signing Certificate 2

SKaloferov_Certificate Path

Note that the certificate has the Digital Signature and Key_Encipherment Key Usage attributes as shown above. It also has the Server Authentication Extended Key Usage attribute.

Copy the PFX certificate package to any Linux appliance.

SKaloferov_Certificate Signing vRO

Using the OpenSSL tool, enter the following commands to create a new keystore and import the PFX certificate package at the same time.

keytool -importkeystore -srckeystore "/etc/vco/app-server/security/rui.pfx" -srcstoretype pkcs12 -srcstorepass "dunesdunes" -deststoretype jceks -destkeystore "/etc/vco/app-server/security/psckeystore" -deststorepass "dunesdunes"

SKaloferov_PFX Certificate

Enter the following command to change the alias of the certificate:

keytool -changealias -alias rui -destalias _dunesrsa_alias_ -keystore "/etc/vco/app-server/security/psckeystore" -storetype jceks -storepass "dunesdunes"

Next, enter this command to generate a security key:

keytool -genseckey -alias _dunessk_alias_ -keyalg DES -keysize 56 -keypass "dunesdunes" -storetype jceks -keystore "/etc/vco/app-server/security/psckeystore" -storepass "dunesdunes"

Notice I’ve used the DES algorithm and 56 key size in the above command, but you can also use the 3DES (DESese) algorithm and 168 key size.

Enter the following command to list the contents of the store.

keytool -list -storetype jceks -keystore "/etc/vco/app-server/security/psckeystore"

Copy the keystore file to your Windows machine.

Open Control Center and navigate to Certificates > Package Signing Certificate.

Click Import > Import from JavaKeyStore file.

Browse the keystore file, and enter the password.

SKaloferov_Current Certificate

Click Import to import the certificate.

Go to Startup Options and restart the Orchestrator service.

Navigate back to Certificates > Package Signing Certificate.

You should now see the new certificate.

SKaloferov_New Certificate

Open your vRealize Orchestrator appliance client, and navigate to Tools > Certificate Manager.

SKaloferov_vRO

You should now see the certificate shown below. The common name can differ, but if you compare the thumbprints, it should match the private key entry in your keystore.

SKaloferov_Keystore

I hope this post was valuable in helping you learn how to change the Package Signing Certificate in a vRealize Orchestrator appliance. Stay tuned for my next post!


Spas Kaloferov is an acting Solutions Architect member of Professional Services Engineering (PSE) for the Software-Defined Datacenter (SDDC) – a part of the Global Technical & Professional Solutions (GTPS) team. Prior to VMware, Kaloferov focused on cloud computing solutions.

VMware Validated Design for SDDC 2.0 – Now Available

Jonathan McDonaldBy Jonathan McDonald

Recently I have been involved in a rather cool project inside VMware, aimed at validating and integrating all the different VMware products. The most interesting customer cases I see are related to this work because oftentimes products work independently without issue—but together can create unique problems.

To be honest, it is really difficult to solve some of the problems when integrating many products together. Whether we are talking about integrating a ticketing system, building a custom dashboard for vRealize Operations Manager, or even building a validation/integration plan for Virtual SAN to add to existing processes, there is always the question, “What would the experts recommend?”

The goal of this project is to provide a reference design for our products, called a VMware Validated Design. The design is a construct that:

  • Is built by expert architects who have many years of experience with the products as well as the integrations
  • Allow repeatable deployment of the end solution, which has been tested to scale
  • Integrates with the development cycle, so if there is an issue with the integration and scale testing, it can be identified quickly and fixed by the developers before the products are released.

All in all, this has been an amazing project that I’ve been excited to work on, and I am happy to be able to finally talk about it publicly!

Introducing the VMware Validated Design for SDDC 2.0

The first of these designs—under development for some time—is the VMware Validated Design for SDDC (Software-Defined Data Center). The first release was not available to the public and only internal to VMware, but on July 21, 2016, version 2.0 was released and is now available to everyone! This design builds not only the foundation for a solid SDDC infrastructure platform using VMware vSphere, Virtual SAN, and VMware NSX, but it builds on that foundation using the vRealize product suite (vRealize Operations Manager, vRealize Log Insight, vRealize Orchestrator, and vRealize Automation).

The VMware Validated Design for SDDC outcome requires a system that enables an IT organization to automate the provisioning of common, repeatable requests and to respond to business needs with more agility and predictability. Traditionally, this has been referred to as Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS); however, the VMware Validated Design for SDDC extends the typical IAAS solution to include a broader and more complete IT solution.

The architecture is based on a number of layers and modules, which allows interchangeable components to be part of the end solution or outcome, such as the SDDC. If a particular component design does not fit the business or technical requirements for whatever reason, it should be able to be swapped out for another similar component. The VMware Validated Design for SDDC is one way of putting an architecture together that has been rigorously tested to ensure stability, scalability, and compatibility. Ultimately, however, the system is designed to ensure the desired outcome will be achieved.

The conceptual design is shown in the following diagram:

JMCDonald_VVD Conceptual Design

As you can see, the design brings a lot more than just implementation details. It includes many common “day two” operational tasks such as management and monitoring functions, business continuity, and security.

To simplify such a complex design, it has been broken up into:

  • A high-level Architecture Design
  • A Detailed Design with all the design decisions included
  • Implementation guidance.

Let’s take an in-depth look.

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Configuring VMware Identity Manager and VMware Horizon 7 Cloud Pod Architecture

Dale CarterBy Dale Carter

With the release of VMware Horizon® 7 and VMware Identity Manager™ 2.6, it is now possible to configure VMware Identity Manager to work with Horizon Cloud Pod Architecture when deploying your desktop and application pools over multiple data centers or locations.

Using VMware Identity Manager in front of your VMware Horizon deployments that are using Cloud Pod Architecture makes it much easier for users to get access to their desktops and applications. The user has just one place to connect to, and they will be able to see all of their available desktops and applications. Identity Manager will direct the user to the application hosted in the best datacenter for their location. This can also include SaaS applications as well as the applications that are available through VMware Horizon 7.

The following instructions show you how to configure VMware Identity Manager to work with VMware Horizon 7 when using Cloud Pod Architecture.

Configure view on the first connector

  1. From the VMware Identity Manager Admin Portal select Catalog, Managed Desktop Appliances, View Application.

DCarter_View Application

  1. Choose the first Identity Manager Connector. This will redirect you to the connector View setup page.
  2. Select the check box to enable View Pools. Add the correct information to the first View Pod, and click Save.

DCarter_View Pools

  1. If there is an Invalid SSL Cert warning, click the warning and Accept.

DCarter_Invalid SSL Cert

  1. Scroll down the page and select Add View Pool.

DCarter_Add View Pool

  1. Add the correct information to the first View Pod and click Save.

DCarter_View Pod

  1. If there is an Invalid SSL Cert warning, click the warning and Accept.
  2. You will now see both View Pods configured for this connector.

DCarter_Remove View Pod

  1. Scroll to the top of the page.
  2. Select Federation.
  3. Check the Enable CPA Federation check box. Fill out the correct information, and add all of the Pods within the Federation.
    DCarter_View Pools Federation
  4. Click Save.
  5. From the Pods and Sync tab, click Sync Now.

DCarter_View Pool Sync

Configure view on all other connectors

  1. From the VMware Identity Manager Admin Portal, select Catalog, Managed Desktop Appliances, View Application.
  2. Select the next connector and follow the instructions above.
  3. Do this for every connector.

Configure network ranges

Once the VMware Horizon View setup is complete, you will need to configure Network Ranges.

  1. From the Identity Manager Admin page, select the Identity & Access Management Tab and click Setup.
  2. Select Network Ranges and click Add Network Range.

DCarter_Add Network Range

  1. Enter the required information and click Save.

DCarter_Add Network Range View Site

  1. This will need to be repeated for all network ranges, usually for each site and external access.

Dale is a Senior Solutions Architect and member of the CTO Ambassadors. Dale focuses in the End User Compute space, where Dale has become a subject matter expert in a number of the VMware products. Dale has more than 20 years’ experience working in IT having started his career in Northern England before moving the Spain and finally the USA. Dale currently holds a number of certifications including VCP-DV, VCP-DT, VCAP-DTD and VCAP-DTA. For more blog post from Dale visit his website at http://vdelboysview.com