Tag Archives: ITaaS

Establish Your IT Business Management Office (ITBMO) To Run IT Like a Business

Khalid HakimBy Khalid Hakim

We hear a lot about (and maybe have interacted with) Project Management Offices (PMOs), and possibly about Service Management Offices (SMOs), but IT Business Management Office (ITBMO) sounds like a new buzz word in today’s modern IT business taxonomy. PMOs typically focus on the management and governance of IT projects, while SMOs are responsible for the governance and management of IT services and the processes to ensure effective service delivery. ITBMOs, however, go beyond this to the next IT business maturity level to address business and finance partnership with IT to help IT organizations transform into services-based, business-oriented, and value-focused organizations.

Click here to read my blog on this topic, covering the business outcomes and value of the ITBMO, the functions contained within, and six steps for standing up the ITBMO.

ITBMO

And if you’re heading to VMworld, don’t miss this session on Tuesday 9/1 at 5:30pm!

OPT 5075 6 Steps to Establish Your IT Business Management Office (ITBMO) with VMware vRealize Business

VMworld 2015

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Khalid Hakim is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice. You can follow him on Twitter @KhalidHakim47.

6 Processes You Should Automate to Provide IT-as-a-Service

kai_holthaus-cropBy Kai Holthaus

IT-as-a-Service (ITaaS) is one of the current paradigm shifts in managing IT organizations and service delivery. It represents an “always-on” approach to services, where IT services are available to customers and users almost instantly, allowing unprecedented flexibility on the business side with regards to using IT services to enable business processes.

This brave new world requires a higher degree of automation and orchestration than is common in today’s IT organizations. This blog post describes some of the new areas of automation IT managers need to think about.

1&2) Event Management and Incident Management

This is the area where automation and orchestration got their start – automated tools and workflow to monitor whether servers, networks, storage—even applications—are still available and performing the way they should be. An analysis should be performed to study whether events, when detected, could be handled in an automated fashion, ideally before the condition causes an actual incident.

If an incident already happened, incident models can be defined and automated, implementing self-healing techniques to resolve the incident. In this case, an incident record must be created and updated as part of executing the incident model. Also, it may be advisable to review the number of incident models executed within a given time period, to determine if a problem investigation should be started.

It is important to note that when a workflow makes these kinds of changes in an automatic fashion, at the very least the configuration management system must be updated per the organization’s policies.

3) Request Fulfillment

Automation and orchestration tools are removing the manual element from request fulfillment. Examples include:

  • Requests for new virtual machines, databases, additional storage space or other infrastructure
  • Requests for end-user devices and accessories
  • Requests for end-user software
  • Request for access to a virtual desktop image (VDI) or delivery of an application to a VDI

Fulfillment workflows can be automated to minimize human interaction. Such human interaction can often be reduced to the approval step, as required.

Again, it is important that the configuration management system gets updated per the organization’s policies since it is part of the workflows.

4&5) Change and Configuration Management

Technology today already allows the automation of IT processes that usually require change requests, as well as approvals, implementation plans, and change reviews. For instance, virtual machine hypervisors and management software such—such as vSphere—can automatically move virtual machines from one physical host to another in a way that is completely transparent to the user.

Besides automating change, the configuration management system should be automatically updated so that support personnel always have accurate information available when incidents need to be resolved.

6) Continuous Deployment

The examples provided so far for automating activities in an IT organization were operations-focused. However, automation should also be considered in other areas, such as DevOps.

Automation and orchestration tools can define, manage, and automate existing release processes, configuring workflow tasks and governance policies used to build, test, and deploy software at each stage of the delivery processes. The automation can also model existing gating rules between the different stages of the process. In addition, automation ensures the correct version of the software is being deployed in the correct environments. This includes integrating with existing code management systems, such as version control, testing, or bug tracking solutions, as well as change management and configuration management procedures.

In an ITaaS model, automation is no longer optional. To fulfill the promise of an always-on IT service provider—and remain the preferred service-provider of your customers—consider automating these and other processes.


Kai Holthaus is a delivery manager with VMware Operations Transformation Services and is based in Oregon.

Why Service Owners Are Integral to IT-as-a-Service Delivery

By Kai Holthaus

kai_holthaus-cropThe Service Owner Role

The service owner role is central for an IT organization that is operating IT as a service (ITaaS). Why? Because the service owner is accountable for delivering services to customers and users, and accountabilities include:

  • To act as prime customer contact for all service-related enquiries and issues
  • To ensure that the ongoing service delivery and support meet agreed customer requirements
  • To identify opportunities for service improvements, discuss with the customer, and raise the request for change (RFC) for assessment if appropriate
  • To liaise with the appropriate process owners throughout the service management lifecycle
  • To solicit required data, statistics and reports for analysis, and to facilitate effective service monitoring and performance
  • To be accountable to the IT director or service management director for the delivery of the service

Please note that I emphasize  “accountability” instead of “responsibility.” The service owner is accountable, meaning they set the goals and oversee the execution.  The actual execution is performed by individuals or functions that have the “responsibility” for each activity.

Let’s take a closer look…

The service owner is the main escalation point for all service-related compliments, complaints, and other issues. You can think of the service owner as a sports coach, directing how the team should play a particular game, but not really participating by playing in the game. As the coach is accountable to the team’s owner for the team’s success, so is the service owner accountable to the customer(s) and the service management director for ongoing quality of the service.

Responsibilities Throughout the Service Lifecycle

The service owner role has accountabilities in each of the five lifecycle stages, as defined by ITIL:

  • Service strategy
  • Service design
  • Service transition
  • Service operation
  • Continual service improvement

I recommend to my clients that they assign a service owner very early in the lifecycle, so that there is a single point of accountability throughout its creation and life.  If we compare this to the product world, a service owner is like a product manager at an automotive company who is accountable as the new car model is designed, developed, and built—and ultimately for the satisfaction of the car’s buyers.

Shifting to an ITaaS Model

While the idea of the service owner role is just as valid in an ITaaS world as it is in a more traditional IT service provider world, there are a few important differences.

Service Owners Must Enable a Faster Time to Market
Moving to an ITaaS model typically requires faster development and release cycles than in a more traditional model. This is usually accomplished by moving to an Agile development model, such as Scrum. Using such models means that the full set of requirements for a service to be released will not be available at the time when development starts. Instead, development begins with the best set of requirements available at the time, and relying on future development / release cycles to address missing requirements.

The certainty of receiving a fully defined set of utility and warranty of a service is being exchanged for more rapid improvement of the service. Service design and transition activities are executed more in a spiral-type model than in a waterfall-type approach.

The service owner in an Agile environment becomes the Scrum product manager, representing the view of the customer in the Scrum model. As the product manager, the service owner is responsible for the pipeline of customer requirements driving the development of the service.  Business decisions on whether to advance the service through another round of development and release is based on the available information at the time.

Service Owners Need a Better Grasp on Future Demand
Some services, particularly infrastructure services, such as providing CPU power or storage, become utility-type services, comparable with the utility services everybody experiences at home, such as electrical power, natural gas, or water. Instead of provisioning dedicated infrastructure at the time of service development or deployment, the service owners must ensure there is enough capacity when needed, e.g., storage should be available instantly available when required— similar to water flowing immediately when you turn on the faucet at home. This requires a much better understanding of future demand, patterns of business activity, and user profiles than is typically the case today.

Service Owners Will Give up Some Control to Enable Automation
Due to the nature of ITaaS, service owners will be required to give up some control over the configuration of the service. For example, automation tools already move virtual machines from one physical host to another based on current workloads, without any human control. To fully deliver on the ITaaS promise, this type of automation must increase. Increased automation will require either defining more changes as standard changes, which can be implemented without approval (and in this case, automatically, after the tool has recorded the change), or give up change control completely, and let the tools handle them. Such automation tools can also automatically update the configuration management system, so that valid information will always be available.

How Will Services Operate in the Cloud?
While today’s services are largely delivered from in-house data centers, the ITaaS model makes full use of hybrid and public clouds.  Service owners must understand the ramifications of moving parts of the service infrastructure (or even the entire infrastructure) into the public cloud. This requires a better understanding of required service levels, and what will happen if cloud providers experience incidents or even disasters.

To conclude, the specific accountabilities associated with the service owner role don’t change dramatically when an IT organization moves to an ITaaS model. Primarily, a service owner will need to shift from defining architectures and infrastructure as part of the service design to defining the service in terms of requirements, and necessary service levels for supporting services. Also, traditional controls over the infrastructure may no longer apply when automation is used to fully deliver on the promise of ITaaS.

While the shift in the service owner’s responsibilities isn’t dramatic when transforming to an ITaaS model, the importance of the role grows significantly.  If you haven’t already explored implementing or expanding this role as you transform to deliver ITaaS, be sure to include this as part of your roadmap for moving forward.

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Kai Holthaus is a senior transformation consultant with VMware Accelerate Transformation Services and is based in Oregon.

The Cloud Architect: Change Champion for the New IT

By Rohan Kalra

RohanKalra-crop“What direction should I take my career with all the changes happening in IT?”

I get this question a lot when working with my clients’ IT teams. The old way of doing things needs to change for the new IT. From an IT operating model standpoint, that means becoming more service-focused. And that’s not all that’s changing—roles within the IT organization are, too.

As practitioners, we need to adapt. For me, it’s always much more fun to be the change champion, imagining how things could be done differently and in completely new ways, than to get left behind in the old world.

I discuss adapting to be a cloud architect in this short video below. There’s also an infographic that ran earlier in this blog that you might be interested in—The Forecast Is Sunny for Cloud Careers—with stats on what’s driving demand for IT professionals with cloud-related skills.

I’d be interested in hearing from you—@kalrarohan.

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Rohan Kalra is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice. Follow him on Twitter @kalrarohan

 

4 Ways to Maximize the Value of VMware vRealize Operations Manager

By Rich Benoit

Benoit-cropWhen installing an enterprise IT solution like VMware vRealize Operations Manager (formerly vCenter Operations Manager), supporting the technology implementation with people and process changes is paramount to your organization’s success.

We all have to think about impacts beyond the technology any time we make a change to our systems, but enterprise products require more planning than most. Take, for example, the difference between installing VMware vSphere compared to an enterprise product. The users affected by vSphere generally sit in one organization, the toolset is fairly simple, little to no training is required, and time from installation to extracting value is a matter of days. Extend this thinking to enterprise products and you have many more users and groups affected, a much more complex toolset, training required for most users, and weeks or months from deployment to extracting real value from the product. Breaking it down like this, it’s easy to see the need to address supporting teams and processes to maximize value.

Here’s a recent example from a technology client I worked with that is very typical of customers I talk to. Management felt they were getting very little value from vRealize Operations Manager. Here’s what I learned:

  • Application dashboards in vRealize Operations Manager were not being used (despite extensive custom development).
  • The only team using the tool was virtual infrastructure (very typical).
  • They had not defined roles or processes to enable the technology to be successful. outside of the virtual infrastructure team.
  • There was no training or documentation for ongoing operations.
  • The customer was not enabled to maintain or expand the tool or its content.

My recommendations were as follows, and this goes for anyone implementing vRealize Operations Manager:

  1. Establish ongoing training and documentation for all users.
  2. Establish an analyst role to define, measure and report on processes and effectiveness related to vRealize Operations Manager and to also establish relationships with potential users and process areas of vRealize Operations Manager content.
  3. Establish a developer role to create and modify content based on the analyst’s collected requirements and fully leverage the extensive functionality vRealize Operations Manager provides.
  4. Establish an architecture board to coordinate an overall enterprise management approach, including vRealize Operations Manager.

The key takeaway here: IT transformation isn’t a plug-and-play proposition, and technology alone isn’t enough to make it happen. This applies especially to a potentially enterprise-level tool like vRealize Operations Manager. In order to maximize value and avoid it becoming just another silo-based tool, think about the human and process factors. This way you’ll be well on the way towards true transformational success for your enterprise.

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Rich Benoit is an Operations Architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice.

Building Service-based Cost Models to Accelerate Your IT Transformation

By Khalid Hakim

“Why is this so expensive?”

As IT moves towards a service-based model, this is the refrain that IT financial managers often hear. It’s a difficult question to answer if you don’t have the data and structure that you need to clearly and accurately defend the numbers. Fighting this perception, and building trust with the line of business, requires a change in how IT approaches cost management that will match the new IT-as-a-service format.

The first and most important step in building service-based cost models is defining what exactly a service is, and what it is not. For example, the onboarding process: is this a service, a process, or an application? Drawing the lines of what service means within your organization, and making it consistent and scalable, will allow you to calculate unit costs. Businesses are already doing cost management by department, by product, by technology, but what about the base costs, such as labor, facilities, or technology within a software-defined data center? Your final service cost should include all these components in a transparent way, so that other parts of the business can understand what exactly they are getting for their money.

Building these base costs into your service cost requires an in-depth look into how service-to-service allocation will work. For example, how do you allocate the cost of the network, which is delivered to desktops, client environments, wireless, VPN, and data centers? Before you can start to bring in a tool to automate costing out your services, map out how each service affects another, and define units and cost points for them. While it’s often tempting to jump straight into service pricing and consider yourself done once it’s complete, it’s important to start with a well defined service catalog, including costs for each service, then to continue to manage and optimize once the pricing has been implemented. Service costing helps to classify your costs, to understand what is fixed, what is variable, direct, indirect, and so forth.

So we’ve allocated the shared cost (indirect cost in accounting language) of services across the catalog. Now it’s time to bring in the service managers—the people who really understand what is being delivered. Just as a manufacturing company would expect a product manager to understand their product end to end, service managers should understand their entire service holistically. Once you’ve built a costing process, the service manager should be able to apply that process to their service.

In the past, service managers have really only been required to understand the technology involved. Bringing them into this process may require them to understand new elements of their service, such as how to sell the service, what it costs, and how to market it. It helps to map out the service in a visual way, which helps the service managers understand their own service better, and also identifies the points at which new costs should be built into the pricing model. Once you understand the service itself, then decide how you want to package it, the SLAs around it, and what the cost of a single unit will be. When relevant, create pre-defined packages that customers will be able to choose from.

SCP white paper coverOnce the costing has been implemented, you can circle back and use the data you’re gathering to help optimize the costs. This is where automation can offer a lot of value. VMware Realize Business (formerly IT Business Management Suite) helps you align IT spending with business priorities by getting full transparency of infrastructure and application cost and service quality. At a high level, it helps you build “what if” cost models, which automatically identify potential areas for cost reduction through virtualization or consolidation. The dashboard view offers the transparency needed to quickly understand cost by service and to be able to justify your costs across the business.

Service-based cost models are a major component of full IT transformation, which requires more than just new technology. You need an integrated approach that includes modernization of people, process, and technology. In this short video below, I share some basic steps that you need to jumpstart your business acumen and deliver your IT services like a business.

For more in-depth guidance, you can also access my white paper: Real IT Transformation Requires a Real IT Service Costing Process, as a resource on your journey to IT as a service.

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Khalid Hakim is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice and is based in Dallas. You can follow him on Twitter @KhalidHakim47.

 

3 Key Trends for 2015: How to Keep Pace with the Rapidly Changing IT Landscape

craig dobsonBy Craig Dobson

So much happened in 2014, and as the New Year begins, I’m looking forward to finding out what 2015 holds—both from a market and an industry perspective. One thing is for certain: the rapid changes we have seen in our industry will continue into the New Year. In fact, the pace of change is likely to accelerate.

I believe the following key trends will be shaping the IT landscape of 2015:

  • Increased application focus
  • Continued movement from CapEx to OpEx models (embracing “x-as-a-Service”)
  • Heightened focus on accurate measurement of the cost-of-IT

Let’s explore these trends in a little more detail.

Application Focus

All throughout 2014 I have been hearing clients say: “it’s all about the application.” In the face of global competition and with the rise of disruptive startups testing the old school business models, the lines of business are seeking innovation, market differentiation, and quick response to changing market dynamics. They are driving IT—and all too frequently looking outside, to cloud-based solutions— to enable quick response to these dynamic changes, often at a lower entry cost.

In 2015, lines of business will prioritize and focus on the business applications that will support the goal of serving, winning, and retaining customers. Application portfolios will change to hybrid architectures that increasingly leverage x-as-a-service models. Supporting platform decisions (such as infrastructure and cloud) will be made based on application decisions. IT professionals will need to stay on top of evolving business applications in order to more effectively support the demands of the lines of business.

Moving from CapEx to OpEx

The appetite to consume anything-as-a-service from external providers has grown throughout 2014, and is now significantly shifting the IT funding model from three- to five-year CapEx investments to OpEx-based consumption models. This shift will accelerate in 2015, and will often be tied to shorter contract periods, with an increased focus on cost and an expectation of a continued improvement on cost-to-serve.

What is driving this change is a general acceptance by mainstream enterprise businesses and different levels of government (through policy changes) that cloud-based services make economic sense, combined with the fact that the business risk of consuming these services has decreased.

Accurate Measurement of the Cost-of-IT

With the shift from CapEx to OpEx models and the focus on the business value of the application lifecycle, the CIO will be under even more pressure to show value back to the lines of business. In 2015, with these new dynamics, and with IT moving to become a full broker of services or portfolio manager (for both internal and external services) delivering x-as-a-service capabilities, this change will demand a greater level of granular and real-time financial reporting at a service level for the consuming lines of business.

This increased financial awareness will provide the ability for IT to show value, offer apples-to-apples comparison between internal IT and external services, as well as comparison between suppliers.

In addition to the cost transparency measures, I believe we will also see an aggressive focus on driving down operational costs to allow the savings to be targeted at next-generation business applications.

Ready for 2015

Let’s face it — change is a given, and 2015 will be no exception for IT. Forward-thinking IT leaders will get ready to deliver applications that meet the dynamic demands of the business; x-as-a-service offerings that meet or exceed end-user requirements; and financial reporting capabilities that not only show end users what they’re paying for but also enable IT to quantify its value.


Craig Dobson is Senior Director of VMware Technical Services for the Asia Pacific region and is based in Sydney.

It’s Time for IT to Come Out of the Shadows

Chances are shadow IT is happening right now at your company. No longer content waiting for their companies’ IT help, today’s employees are taking action into their own hands by finding and using their own technology to solve work challenges as they arise—a trend that likely isn’t fading into the shadows anytime soon.

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What Does It Mean for IT to Be Customer-Focused?

By John Worthington

worthingtonp-cropBy definition a service is a means of delivering outcomes that a customer wants to achieve, so it’s important not to forget where these outcomes originate in order for IT to be customer-focused.

Transforming IT from a technology-oriented to a services-oriented organization is at the heart of IT service management.  The “specialized organizational capabilities for delivering value to customers in the form of services” must be developed, refined, and continually improved with business outcomes in mind.

If IT is working well, with a true service orientation, your customer will see that:

  • IT actions align with the business, particularly in ways that help the business serve external business customers
  • IT costs are controlled and reduced wherever possible
  • Quality of end-to-end IT services is improved
  • IT agility in responding to business needs is improved
  • IT is focused on customer results
  • Prioritization of IT expenditures and actions is based on business priorities

For the IT organization, this service orientation starts with defining what constitutes a “service” in the context of the particular business and cataloging all the services available. Then the resulting service catalog, and the full service portfolio of which it is a part, become the means of ensuring that IT and the business are always completely in synch around IT services and their value.

What your customers want from IT
When I work with IT organizations that are building their initial catalog of services, I’m interested to see who views whom as the “customer.”  This is fundamental, however, since it is IT’s customer who defines value.

Frequently, service definition work is driven between particular IT groups, which can essentially put the entire effort within the boundaries of the IT organization, as illustrated in Figure 1.  This can result in an internally focused view of the customer/supplier relationship.  The focus is on supporting services, and parts of the IT organization itself end up being treated as “customers” of other parts of IT.

Figure 1 – Supporting Service Focus

Undoubtedly supporting services are important, since these are the building blocks that provide the capabilities that enable the customer-facing, outcome-oriented services.  But they are not what the business is ultimately concerned with.  Enumerating supporting services does not provide for the benefits the business expects – surely we don’t intend the service catalog to be limited to the IT organization!

Another approach I see my clients commonly take is to begin defining services that face the internal customers — the business — which establishes service catalog boundaries within the enterprise as illustrated in Figure 2.  Services are defined as what IT does for the business itself, without reference to the external customers of the business.

Figure 2 – Internal Customer Focus

This approach reflects a critical step in the evolution of an IT organization’s maturity as a service provider.  IT has begun to look at customer outcomes, with the customer being the business the IT organization serves.  I believe such an approach can lead to a more coordinated, collaborative way of working within IT; the various IT groups focus their attention on end-to-end service provisioning, not merely on their own IT silos.

So while initial service catalogs often start with the existing applications and infrastructure and package that for customers, a best practice approach that I recommend is to begin with the outcomes that customers desire and define services based on them as illustrated in Figure 3.

Figure 3 – External Customer Focus

The truth is, there will need to be multiple cycles of service definition and re-definition that need to continue indefinitely, since customers’ desired outcomes and perceptions are under constant change.

Defining services from the top down, starting with external services, is also a recommended approach. But this is easier said than done, since it quickly exposes a need to define both internal customer-facing services and supporting services.

Accelerating the journey to IT as a Service
This is the exciting part of being part of VMware. By establishing re-usable supporting IT services enabled by a software-defined data center and transformation road maps that make sure people and process changes are in place to realize the IT-as-a-service vision, I can help the IT organizations I work with to accelerate their ability to be truly customer-focused.


John Worthington is a VMware transformation consultant and is based in New Jersey. Follow @jMarcusWorthy and @VMwareCloudOps on Twitter.

How IT Can Transform “Trust Debt” into True Business Alignment

By Kevin Lees

Kevin_cropIn my previous post, 5 Ways Cloud Automation Drives Greater Cost and Operational Transparency, I wrote about how automation can help alleviate tension between IT and and the lines of business. Let’s continue to explore that theme as we look into ways to bring in tighter alignment between business objectives and IT capabilities.

“Instead of cost centers that provide capabilities, IT organizations must become internal service providers supplying business-enabling solutions that drive innovation and deliver value…true business partners rather than increasingly irrelevant, cost-centric technology suppliers.” This quote comes from the white paper How IT Organizations Can Achieve Relevance in the Age of Cloud[1], which provides insight into the ways IT needs to change to become a true partner with the entire business to help meet overall objectives.

So to get to that place of true partnership and business agility, all IT has to do is become an internal service provider and deliver business-enabling solutions, and then the business will regard IT as a true partner, right? If only it were that simple.

While there’s nothing wrong with the goal of adding business value and increasing responsiveness to business requirements, there is another problem that has been largely overlooked: The “trust debt” that has built up between IT and its business customers.

As a result of the way it has operated in the past, IT must overcome trust debt to gain true business alignment. Business alignment must be achieved before the optimal “business-enabling solutions” can be designed, developed, and deployed to meet business users’ needs.

As is the case with financial debts, IT must make payments on this accumulated trust debt, with interest. The interest comes in where IT must go above and beyond end user expectations to prove its willingness and ability to ensure that technology helps, rather than hinders, the business. The payments themselves can take many forms, including: implementing new technology that delivers new capabilities, demonstrating a service-oriented mindset, or even taking the extra step of becoming truly transparent.

Overcoming Trust Debt: Starting Point and First Steps
Making any change starts with a bit of exploration and personal reflection. Ultimately technology and IT’s role as a whole is about meeting the needs of the business at the speed business requires. This, of course, demands greater agility — enabled by the ability to offer cloud computing capabilities on top of a software-defined data center.

To overcome trust debt, IT must first get out of its comfort zone, which is firmly rooted in enabling technology. IT leaders may first need to ask: What is IT “enabling” with technology?

Start with the Stack
Let’s face it: Agility demands a dynamic technology stack. To be dynamic at the level that business requires today can only be achieved in software; hardware is too static and difficult to change. A software-defined data center uses a fully virtualized stack that can quickly and dynamically change to meet the needs of the business.

Automation, coupled with the key cloud capability of self-service, on-demand provisioning provides agility. More than anything else, automated self-service, on-demand provisioning alone can be the compelling reason businesses are drawn to cloud. Imagine what would happen if business constituents could select the service offering to deploy, along with the level of service they desire, and some very short time later the virtual server would be available with that service (a marketing demo, for example). That’s a huge win and a step closer to eradicating trust debt.

This level of service alone could become IT’s calling card. The marketing demo example mentioned above is not hypothetical—I saw this recently at a large financial institution. A marketing team needed to stand up a demo that customers could access externally so they could beat the competition to market. Traditional IT said that demo could be available in about six weeks. But the marketing person driving the initiative had heard about this thing called a cloud that had been set up in a separate IT initiative. She contacted the responsible IT team who gave her access. Within 24 hours she had her demo up with customers actively using it.

This one occurrence launched the company’s cloud initiative. Word spread like wildfire throughout the organization and demand ramped so quickly that IT had to gate it to bring on more infrastructure. (If only they’d had a hybrid cloud!)

Simply put, agility sold the cloud. And what better way to regain trust and create new opportunities to drive business alignment?

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Kevin Lees is Global Principal Architect, Operations Transformation Practice. Follow @VMwareCloudOps on Twitter for future updates, and join the conversation by using the #CloudOps and #SDDC hashtags on Twitter.


 [1] CIO white paper: “How IT Organizations Can Achieve Relevance in the Age of Cloud,” 2013