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Tag Archives: IT operations

5 Steps to Building Your High-Performance Cloud Organization

Make sure learning happens by design; not just trial and error.

Pierre Moncassin-cropBy Pierre Moncassin

One of the often-overlooked aspects of building an effective cloud organization lies in the training and development of team members. My customers often ask, “How do I accelerate my IT organization’s transition to cloud?” Well, there is much more to my answer than relates to deploying toolsets.

What the IT organization needs is accelerated learning—learning at organizational level as well as individual. All too often, that learning happens in part by accident.  An enthusiastic project team installs the technology first, sometimes as a pilot. The technology works wonders and produces great initial results, e.g., IT services can be provisioned and managed with levels of speed and efficiency that were simply not possible before. Then sometimes, the overall project just stalls. Not because of a technical shortfall. The reason is that the organization has not completely figured out how to fully leverage that technology, and more importantly, how to fit it in with the rest of the IT organization. This is a shortfall of learning.

Faced with the challenge of learning to leverage the technology, many organizations fall back on the tried and tested approach known as “learning on the job.”  After all, this is an approach that has worked for centuries! But in the fast-paced cloud era, you want to accelerate the learning process. Really, you want learning by design not just by trial and error. So, where do you start?

Here are some practical lessons that I have collected by supporting successful projects with customers and within VMware:

1. Design a plan for the organization.
Org for Cloud wp
It stands to reason that the future organization will be different from the current, “pre-cloud” organization. However, the optimal structure will not be reached without planning. In practice we want to gradually flesh out your tenant operations and infrastructure operations teams, as describe in more details in the white paper: Organizing for the Cloud.

In turn, this means orchestrating the transition from the current roles into the target organization. Each transitioned role will require a skills development plan adapted to the individual.

2.    Plan for formal skills development.
The fist step to plan skills development is to carry out a gap analysis of each selected team member, against their future roles (e.g. , service owner, service architect, and so forth). Each role carries specific requirements in terms of technical skills—without delving in all the details, a blueprint manager will need deeper knowledge of VMware vRealize Automation than a customer relationship manager; however the customer relationship manager will need some awareness of the blueprints and how they can be leveraged to meet customer requirements effectively.

3. Reinforce learning with mentoring and coaching.
Mentoring and coaching are effective ways to reinforce the individual’s own learning. Typically mentoring will focus on knowledge transfer based on personal experience. For example, encourage sharing of experience by pairing up the new service architect with an experienced service architect (either in another part of the organization—if existing—or from another organization).

Coaching will focus on individual skill development—either by learning directly from the coach, or from the coach supporting an individual’s own learning journey.

Although coaching/mentoring is by definition highly personalized  (learner centric), it is a good idea to establish a formal structure around it. For example, assign coaches/mentors to all future cloud team members, with a mechanism to track activity and results.

4.    Develop leaders with both business and technical skills.
As when building any team, it is important to identify and nurture a cadre of leaders for the cloud organization.  These leaders will be both the formal leadership roles (tenant operations leader, infrastructure operations leader), but also critical roles such as service owner and service architect.

Such leaders will hold a key role in representing the cloud organization within the broader business.  Part of their development will include broadening their understanding of the business. For example, by assigning them mentors within the lines of business—this is another example where mentoring comes in handy.

However business acumen, whilst important, is not enough. These roles also need to develop broad technical skills to be able to articulate solutions across technical silos and understand the new capabilities introduced by cloud automation.

5.    Reach out to the broader organization with a champions community.
Champions, a.k.a change agents, are advocates within the rest of the organization (especially within the lines of business) who will spread the awareness and support for the cloud. These champions help bridge the silos with business users and win “hearts and minds.” Refer to my earlier blog where I explained how we leverage a change agent program within VMware and the lessons that can be inferred. Your change agents will make sure that the broader organization/business learns about the cloud project and ultimately adopts it.

Takeaways:

  • Plan the transition and learning curve both for your organization and the individuals.
  • Combine formal learning with individual-centric learning (coaching and mentoring).
  • Invest effort in developing at an early stage, the future leaders and champions  for cloud adoption. Make sure that their planned learning spans across both technical and business knowledge.

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Pierre Moncassin is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice and is currently on long-term assignment in Asia-Pacific. Follow @VMwareCloudOps on Twitter for future updates.

The Business Case for Cloud Automation

Automating in the Cloud Pays Off

Green vs. Grey: Rethinking Your IT Operations

By Neil Mitchell

Neil Mitchell-cropMany of the customers I work with wish, at least in the short term, to provide IT services internally rather than outsource. They are also considering introducing cloud services as a catalyst for transitioning away from traditional IT practices—to establish new practices and processes appropriate for effective and efficient cloud service delivery. They also recognise that this will require a fundamental shift in their approach and that they will need to modify their operating model and organisation structure to support this.

Picture the scenario: an existing IT organisation that has built up over many years; is delivering services and may follow traditional good practice frameworks such as ITIL. However, chances are that the organization is not optimised for the delivery of cloud services—it’s probably siloed, may have developed many poor and labour-intensive practices along the way, and may not be perceived to deliver value. Sound familiar?

An option therefore is to re-invent IT. Create a new greenfield IT organisation with no legacy constraints. Can it be done? Of course, anything is theoretically possible. But is it realistic? What are the challenges?

Let’s make some assumptions for this new greenfield organisation:

  • New staff can be recruited—it won’t be necessary to transition staff from the old organisation.
  • There is the opportunity to establish new, optimised processes across the new organisation.
  • There will be no need to share information or systems between the old and the new organisations.
  • The new organisation can share the current data centres.

I break the challenges around this outwardly simple greenfield goal into two primary areas: 1) organisational, and 2) process and technology. And in my experience, there can be more questions than answers. However, I encourage my clients to address these issues before establishing what may be unachievable strategies.

1. Organisational challenges.

With any programme of change such as will be triggered by the introduction of cloud services, cultural change is the greatest challenge. You can argue that introducing a new greenfield organisation will overcome this—so let’s take a closer look.

Firstly staffing. Your old IT organisation will not disappear overnight. You would be introducing a new parallel or shadow organisation. Do you transition staff across or recruit from scratch?  If you transition staff, legacy practices and behaviours will almost certainly migrate. Equally, if you do not transition staff, good practices may be lost. If you recruit from scratch then there is overall induction to the organisation and associated training to be considered—with inherent hidden costs, not to mention any additional employment obligations that come with recruiting. There may also be HR implications for the existing staff. New staff does not necessarily mean a new culture and better behaviours.

You will also need to determine if you can use contractors, either as an interim to help establish the new cloud organisation or to backfill the existing one. Either is an option, but be aware that contractors may have a different objective from what is necessarily in the best interests of the company. You will need to expend effort to ensure that you obtain well-qualified and professional contractors who would be an asset to your company in establishing the cloud organisation.

Any of these options will create a bigger IT organisation—at least in the short term—for which you must budget.

Secondly organisation structure. Should the new cloud organisation work within the existing organisation? Keeping it within the existing organisation structure runs the risk of undue influence by the “we’ve always done it this way” crowd so may not be truly greenfield. If a separate organisation or department, you will need also to determine whether to replicate management and back-office functions such as HR, Procurement, and IT Finance.

Another consideration is whether the new organisation is to be in a new location or within an existing site.  A new location certainly works from an isolation perspective and will reduce risk of migrating legacy practices, but you may also lose the positive benefits of interaction with the existing staff.

2. Process and technology challenges.  

Let’s start with the new cloud architecture and whether it will be stand-alone. Consider possible components: operating system, middleware, monitoring agents, and even application components. There may be corporate standards and configurations to be followed, which will need to be reviewed to ensure they are fit for purpose in the new environment. And, whether you set up a shadow support organisation or take advantage of existing expertise is yet another consideration.

Security, risk, and compliance concerns must also be addressed early on, as the new IT organisation will likely have to interact with the existing business to ensure the delivered services meet any regulatory or legal requirements. Your new IT organisation will not be thanked for delivering services that brought in unwelcome regulatory investigations!

IT service management brings up numerous considerations including whether to:

  • Create a parallel service desk vs. modify process and procedures for the existing service desk
  • Retain the single number your customer calls today vs. provide access to all new cloud services solely online via a service catalogue
  • Implement new parallel processes and even new systems for event, incident, problem, and change management vs. modify existing ones to account for a cloud-optimized approach

Correct provision of cloud services will introduce a major increase in policy-based automation and standardisation and result in opportunities for you to optimize operations, but not in isolation from the higher-level service management context.

Is a greenfield organisation really a practical option for you? It may be as an aspiration, but if you’re like most of the IT executives I work with, the reality is a little more grey.

Org for Cloud wpSo where to start?

VMware has built some of the largest and most successful public and private clouds in the world, and we thoroughly understand the opportunities and the challenges. My recommendation to you as a starting point—my colleague Kevin Lees, Principal Architect for VMware’s global Operations Transformation Practice, recently updated his white paper, Organizing for the Cloud. The paper looks at the organisational impacts of transformation from multiple perspectives and provides insights and advice about how to prepare for—and execute—your winning transformation strategy.

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Neil Mitchell is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice and is based in the UK.

Transforming Operations and Perception of the IT Organization

By David Crane

dcrane-cropA recent engagement with a long-established telecommunications firm presented a huge challenge—the solution for which is a great example of how operations transformation can drive technical transformation. The firm’s customer base spans various global regions, each of which presented a different customer experience. The IT organization functioned in extremely siloed environments, having grown organically over 25 years to support an aging, fragmented infrastructure.

A frustrated but motivated CIO laid down the following requirements for the VMware consulting services team, to be met over an aggressive six-month timeline:

  • Reduce operational costs
  • Improve agility
  • Provide more service offerings
  • Help IT become a service broker and eliminate shadow IT
  • Build a flexible architecture to meet the needs of the business
  • Reduce total number of physical data centers
  • Gain more control and compliance of IT infrastructure environments

The internal IT team lacked the expertise and resources required to implement a software-defined data center (SDDC) solution. Their service request process was time-consuming, manual, and inconsistent. Add to that an average provisioning time for a full end-to-end server of eight weeks, and it’s no surprise that internal customers were seeking out external solution providers for their IT needs.

The VMware team set out to remedy all of this with the following solution:

  • Implement a production SDDC platform
  • Make self-service automated provisioning the first available service
  • Assess the customers’ operating processes
  • Introduce an optimized organizational structure
  • Integrate operations transformation and technical implementation
  • Take a phased approach to the project with clearly defined milestones to deliver immediate results
  • Ensure the VMware team team worked closely with internal groups

Transforming the Operating Model
Breaking down the siloed IT organization, and introducing horizontal, cross-departmental communications was the first step to allow the customer to become service-focused.

The team did have the business analyst concept, but the analysts sat outside the IT organization. They didn’t understand IT and weren’t incentivized to do so. As a result, rogue users were going out and doing things themselves, leading to compliance and governance issues.

We introduced the concept of infrastructure operations and tenant operations. These were cross-functional teams that talk to each other—a virtual center of excellence within the IT organization. As part of this organizational change, we brought in new roles, the two most important being the customer relationship manager and the service owner. We brought customer relationship management back into IT, so the person in the role started to understand IT and what they could deliver (and how) against customer requirements.

One of these requirements was the revelation that customers did not really have an interest in availability.  This was not because they didn’t care, but simply because IT over the years has become robust enough that availability is expected.  What their customers really cared about was the speed, and standardization, of the service provisioning lifecycle, as it was this that allowed them to quickly respond to market demands, and support the business objective to be the first to market with new products.

This led to a technical requirement as the IT organization’s customers requested to see this information in a dashboard format, so that proactive monitoring of the provisioning process could take place.

Transforming Infrastructure Operations
The service owners played a key role in saying VMware vRealize Operations only looks at infrastructure—this resulted in a demand to change things within VMware vRealize Automation.

However, the dashboards needed to be delivered through vRealize Operations. To meet the technical requirement, we focused on the self-service provisioning portal and allowed consumers to monitor the status of their ordered services via that portal. To do that, we needed a dashboard in VMware vRealize Operations to monitor the KPIs involved in service provisioning. In order to build the dashboard to monitor provisioning time, we had to create a custom solution using vRealize Automation. The technical solution was necessary to enable the operating framework architecture and organizational model to support it.

Dashboard Solution
We ended up with a provisioned resources dashboard as shown in figure 1 below that lists each virtual machine (VM) and the number of minutes it took to be provisioned. Less than 30 minutes shows green, less than two hours shows yellow, and over two hours is red. It also shows the average, minimum, and maximum times to provision.

Time to Provision

Figure 1:  Provisioned resources dashboard

The dashboard also enabled the customer to use data to feed back into the service life cycle process. For example, they started to understand service demand. Service owners—who were expected to forecast demand for services—could now do so with more accuracy. Now that the team was forecasting capacity demand more accurately, they were able to increase credibility by sharing this information with the infrastructure team. And ultimately they saved money by having a better handle on demand.

The dashboard also allowed IT to develop proactive operational processes.  On several occasions the service owners started to see a degradation in performance of the provisioning process, while the infrastructure monitoring dashboards were still showing a healthy ecosystem.

On further analysis, changes to the underlying infrastructure, whilst keeping in tolerance and SLA for the IT infrastructure teams, were having an accumulative impact further down the chain to the service provisioning process.

The provisioning dashboard and further integration with the customers’ service desk platform and event, incident, and problem management processes allowed the IT infrastructure teams to tune the change management process so that service provisioning would not be affected.

In the end, IT became service-oriented because of the dashboard. Because internal customers could use that tool to see the incredible accuracy with which the IT team was meeting its 30-minutes-or-less goal, it had a huge impact on the way the IT was perceived within business. IT’s credibility skyrocketed, and suddenly it became easier to drive things like the “cloud first” policy within the organization.

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David Crane is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice and is based in the U.K.

How to Avoid 5 Common Mistakes When Implementing an SDDC Solution

By Jose Alamo

Jose alamo-cropImplementing a software-defined data center (SDDC) is much more than implementing or installing a set of technology — an SDDC solution requires clear changes to the organization vision, policies, processes, operations, and organization readiness. Today’s CIO needs to spend a good amount of time understanding the business needs, the IT organization’s culture, and how to establish the vision and strategy that will guide the organization to make the adjustments required to meet the needs of the business.

The software-defined data center is an open architecture that impacts the way IT operates today. And as such, the IT organization needs to create a plan that will utilize the investments in people, process, and technology already made to deliver both legacy and new applications while meeting vital IT responsibilities. Below is a list of five common mistakes that I’ve come across working with organizations that are implementing SDDC solutions, and my recommendations on how avoid their adverse impacts:

1. Failure to develop the vision and strategy—including the technology, process, and people aspects
Many times organizations implement solutions without setting the right expectation and a clear direction for the program. The CIO must use all the resources available within the IT organization to create a vision and strategy, and in some cases it is necessary to bring in external resources that have experience in the subject. The vision and strategy must align with the business needs, and it should identify the different areas that must be analyzed to ensure a successful adoption of an SDDC solution.

In my experience working with clients, it is imperative that as part of the planning a full assessment is conducted, and it must include the areas of people, process, and technology. A SWOT analysis should also be completed to fully understand the organization’s strengths,  weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. Armed with this insight, the CIO and IT team will be able to express the direction that must be taken to be successful, including the changes required across people, process, and technology.

Failing to complete this step will add complexity and lack of clarity for those who will be responsible for implementing the solution.

2. Limited time spent reviewing and understanding the current policies
There are often many policies within the IT organization that can prevent moving forward with the implementation of SDDC solutions. In such cases, the organization needs to have an in-depth review of the current policies governing the business and IT day-to-day operations. The IT team also needs to ensure it devotes a significant amount of time with the company’s security and compliance team to understand their concerns and what measures need to be taken to make the necessary adjustments to support the implementation of the solutions. For example, the IT organization needs to look at its change policies; some older policies could prevent the deployment of process automation that is key to the SDDC solution. When these issues are identified from the beginning, IT can start the negotiation with the lines of business to either change its policies or create workarounds that will allow the solution to provide the expected value.

Performing these activities at the beginning of the project will allow IT leadership to make smart choices and avoid delays or workarounds when deploying future SDDC solutions.

3. Lack of maturity around the IT organization’s service management processes
The software-defined data center redefines IT infrastructure and enables the IT organization to combine technology and a new way of operating to become more service-oriented and more focused on business value. To support this transformation, mature service management processes need to be established.

After the assessment of current processes, the IT organization will be able to determine which process will require a higher level of maturity, which process will need to be adapted to the SDDC environment, and which processes are missing and will need to be established in order to support the new environment.

Special attention will be required for the following processes:  financial management, demand management, service catalog management, service level management, capacity management, change management, configuration management, event management, request fulfillment, and continuous service improvement.

Ensure ownership is identify for each process, with KPIs and measurable metrics established—and keep the IT team involved as new processes are developed.

4. Managing the new solution as a retrofit within the current environment
Many IT organizations will embrace a new technology and/or solution only to attempt to retrofit it into their current operational model. This is typically a major mistake, especically if the organization is expecting better efficiency, more flexibility, lower cost to operate, transparency, and tighter compliance as potential benefits from an SDDC.

Organizations must assess their current requirements and determine if they will be required for the new solutions. Most processes, roles, audit controls, reports, and policies are in place to support the current/legacy environment, and each must be assessed to determine its purpose and value to the business, and to determine whether it is required for the new solution.

IT leadership should ask themselves: If the new solution is going to be retrofitted into the current operational model, then why do we need a new solution?  What business problems are we going to resolve if we don’t change the way we operate?

My recommendation to my clients is to start lean, minimize the red tape, reduce complex processes, automate as much as possible, clearly identify new roles, implement basic reporting, and establish strict change policies. The IT organization needs to commit to minimize the number of changes to the new solution to ensure only changes that are truly required get implemented.

5. No assessment of the IT organization’s capabilities and no plan to fill the skill set gaps
The most important resource to the IT organization is its people. IT management can implement the greatest technologies, but their organizations will not be successful if their people are not trained and empowered to operate, maintain, and enhance the new solution.

The IT organization needs to first assess current skill sets. Then work with internal resources and/or vendors to determine how the organization needs to evolve in order to achieve its desired state. Once that gap has been identified, the IT management team can develop an enablement plan to begin to bridge the gap. Enablement plans typically include formal “train the trainer” models to cascade knowledge within the organization, as well as shadowing vendors for organizational insight and guidance along with knowledge transfer sessions to develop self-sufficiency. In some cases it may be necessary to bring in external resources to augment the IT team’s expertise.

In conclusion, implementing a software-defined data center solution will require a new approach to implementing processes, technologies, skill sets, and even IT organizational structures. I hope these practical tips on how to avoid common mistakes will help guide your successful SDDC solution implementations.

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Jose Alamo is a senior transformation consultant with VMware Accelerate Advisory Services and is based in Florida. Follow Jose on Twitter @alamo_jose  or connect on LinkedIn.

A New Angle on the Classic Challenge of Retained IT

By Pierre Moncassin

Pierre Moncassin-cropWhen discussing the organization models for managing cloud infrastructure with customers, I have come across situations where some if not all infrastructure services are outsourced to a third party. In these situations my customers often ask – does your (VMware) operating model still apply? Should I retain cloud-related skills in-house? If so, which ones?

The short answer is: Yes. The advice I give my customers is that their IT organization should establish a core organization modeled on the “tenant operations” team as defined in Organizing for the Cloud, a VMware white paper by my colleague Kevin Lees.

Let’s assume a relatively simple scenario where a single outsourcer is providing “standard” infrastructure services — such as computing, storage, backups. In this scenario, the outsourcer has accepted to transform at least some of its services towards software-defined data center (SDDC), which is by no means an easy step (I will return to that point later).

For now let’s also assume a cooperative situation where customer and outsourcer are collaboratively working towards a cloud model. The question is — what skills and functions should the customer retain in-house? Which skills can be handed over to the outsourcer?

The question is a classic one. In traditional infrastructure outsourcing, we would talk about a “retained IT” organization.  For the SDDC environment, here are some skill groups that I believe have to be preserved within the core, in-house team:

  • Service Design and Self-service Provisioning is clearly a skillset to keep in-house. The in-house team must be able to work with the business to define services end-to-end, but the team should also be able to grasp accurately the possibilities that automation offers with software such as VMware vCloud Automation Center.  Though I am not suggesting that the core team needs to be expert in all aspects of workflows, APIs or scripting, they do need a solid grasp of the possibilities of automation.
  • Process Automation and Optimization.  A solid working knowledge of automation software is useful but not enough.  The in-house teams are required to decide which processes to automate and how. They need to make business-level decisions. Which processes are worth automating? What is the benefit of automation versus its cost?
  • Security and Compliance is often a top priority for cloud adopters. The cloud-based services need to align with enterprise policies and standards.  The retained IT function must be able to demonstrate compliance and where needed, enforce those standards in the cloud infrastructure.
  • Service Level Management and Trend Analysis. Whilst the retained IT organization does not need to be involved in the day-to-day monitoring and troubleshooting, they need to be able to monitor key service levels. Specifically, the business users will be highly sensitive to the performance of some business-critical applications. The retained IT organization will need to keep enough knowledge of these applications and of performance monitoring tools to ensure that application performance is measured adequately.
  • Application Life Cycle (DevOps). We have assumed in our scenario an infrastructure-only outsourcing — the skills for application development remaining in-house.  In the SDDC environment, the tenant operations team will work closely with the application development teams. Amongst other skills, the retained IT will need detailed knowledge not only of application provisioning, but also the architectures, configuration dependencies, and patching policies required to maintain those applications.

I have reviewed skills groups needed as more automation is used, but there will be less reliance on skills that relate to routine tasks and trouble-shooting. Skills that can typically be outsourced include:

  • Routine scripting and monitoring
  • System (middleware) configuration
  • Routine network administration

The diagram below is a (very simplified) summary of the evolution from traditional retained IT to tenant operations for SDDC environments.

Retained IT modelIt is also worth noting that the transformation from traditional infrastructure outsourcing to SDDC is a far from obvious step from the point of view of an outsourcer. Why should the outsourcer invest time and cost to streamline services, if the end customer has already contracted to pay for the full cost of service? Gaining buy-in from the outsourcer to transform its model can be a significant challenge. Therefore it is prudent to key to gain acceptance either:
–  early in the contract negotiations, so that the provider can build in a cloud delivery model in its service offering,
– or towards the end of a contract when the outsourcer is often highly motivated to obtain a renewal.

Finally outsourcers may initiate their own technology refresh programs, which can create a win-win situation when both sides are prepared to invest in modernization towards SDDC.

3 Key Take-Aways

  1. Organizations that undertake their journey to SDDC with an outsourcer are advised to establish a core SDDC  organization including most tenant operations skills; a key focus is to leverage automation (whilst routine, repetitive tasks can be outsourced).
  2. The exact profile of the tenant operations (retained IT) will depend on the scope of the outsourcing contract.
  3. Early contract negotiations, renewals, or technology refresh can create opportunities to encourage an outsourcer to move towards the SDDC model.

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Pierre Moncassin
is an operations architect with VMware’s Global Operations Transformation Practice and is based in the UK. Follow @VMwareCloudOps on Twitter for future updates.

VMware vCenter Operations Manager Users: Raise Your Hands!

Keng-Leong-Choong-cropBy Choong Keng Leong

I innocently asked attendees in a workshop I was delivering at one of my clients, “Who uses VMware vCenter Operations Management Suite in your company?“ I got two simple answers: “Cloud administrator” or “VM administrator.”  This triggered me to write this blog and hopefully will change your thinking if you have the same answer.

The vCenter Operations Management Suite consists of four components:

  • vCenter Operations Manager : Allows you to monitor and manage the performance, capacity and health of your SDDC infrastructure, operating systems and applications
  • vCenter Configuration Manager : Enables you to automate configuration management across virtual and physical servers, and continuously assess them for compliance with IT policies, regulatory, and security compliance
  • vCenter Hyperic : Helps to monitor operating systems, databases, and applications
  • vCenter Infrastructure Navigator : Automatically discovers and visualizes application components and infrastructure dependencies

If I were to map the vCenter Operations Management Suite to the IT processes it can support, it would look like the matrix shown in Table 1:

Table 1: A Possible vCenter Operations Management Suite to Process Mapping

What Table 1 also implies is that multiple roles will be using and accessing vCenter Operations Manager, or be a recipient of its outputs, i.e., reports. For example, the IT Director can access the vCenter Operations Manager Dashboard to view the overall health of the infrastructure. The Application Support team accesses it via a Custom Dashboard to understand applications status and performance. The IT Compliance Manager reviews the compliance status of IT systems on the vCenter Operations Manager Dashboard and gets more details from the vCenter Configuration Manager to initiate remediation of the systems.

Table 2 below shows a possible list of roles accessing the vCenter Operations Management Suite.

Table 2: Possible List of Roles Using vCenter Operations Management Suite

Tables 1 and 2 illustrate clearly that vCenter Operations Management Suite is not just another lightweight app for the cloud or VM administrator — it supports multiple IT operational processes and roles.

Taking a step further, you need to embed vCenter Operations Management Suite into operational procedures to take maximum advantage of the tools’ full potential and integrated approach to performance, capacity, and configuration management. To draw an analogy –  if you deploy a new SAP system without defining the triggers or use cases for a user to access the SAP system; establishing the procedural steps on which modules to access and how to navigate in the system; what to input; how to query and report and so on; it is unlikely the system will be rolled out successfully.

Although vCenter Operations Management Suite is not as complex, the concept is the same. You need to define procedures with tight linkage to the tools to ensure they are used consistently and in the way it is designed or configured for.

I hope that my blog motivates you to start thinking about transforming your IT operations to make full use of the capabilities of your VMware technology investment.

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Choong Keng Leong is an operations architect with VMware Professional Services and is based in Singapore. You can connect with him on LinkedIn

How to Drive Tighter Alignment Between Business and IT

Many IT stakeholders have limited trust in the IT organization as a result of the way it has operated in the past. In this short video, Kevin Lees shares tips on how IT can deal with this real-world problem that is almost always overlooked.

Kevin Lees is principal architect of the VMware Global Operations Transformation Practice. Coming to VMworld? Don’t miss his session OPT1547 – Organizing for the Software-Defined Data Center (SDDC): Practical Advice for Practitioners

Driving Biz Alignment front coverRelated: Read Kevin’s recent post 5 Ways Cloud Automation Drives Greater Cost and Operational Transparency and download eBook Driving Business Alignment Through IT Transformation for more information.

The Missing Link of IT: An Effective Service Costing Process

By Khalid Hakim

For years now, there has been much discussion about the urgent need for tighter alignment between business and IT. Why are we still talking about the “need for” alignment and not the “results of” better alignment? Because all too often, IT cannot answer one of the key questions business leaders ask: “What exactly does this service cost?”

In many cases IT does not have an adequate service costing process, which means it does not have a fast, accurate, consistent, fair way to provide cost information about IT services to constituents. And the lack of an effective service costing process is costing both IT and the business—big time.

Cost transparency is important not only because IT service users want to know what they’re paying for, but also because it provides an opportunity for IT to quantify its value to the business.

If IT can provide accurate cost information, both business and IT leaders can make better decisions about IT investments, outsourcing, cost cutting, business strategy, and competitive differentiation.

We’ve all heard the mantra “Minimize IT costs while maximizing business value,” or its short form: “Do more with less.” It’s a core principle of IT business management (ITBM). But without an accurate, transparent service costing process, how can IT leaders truly deliver IT as a service (ITaaS) and run IT like a business?

Take a closer look at your existing service costing process and ask yourself a few tough questions:

  • Is it accurate? Does it take into account all of the CapEx and OpEx elements of delivering an IT service?
  • Is it equitable? Does it charge the right constituents the right amounts for IT services, based on their actual consumption—or does it simply charge a lump sum based on voodoo economics?
  • Is it transparent? Can constituents get an accurate breakdown of what’s included in the final price tag and what isn’t?
  • Is it improving IT investment planning? Your service costing process should enable business and IT leaders to create more finely honed investment strategies that cut costs while creating new competitive advantages. Is it?

If you can look in the mirror and answer “yes” to all those questions, congratulations—you’re a member of a small minority of enterprise IT departments with an effective service costing process. If not, ask yourself the next logical question: How can you develop a better service costing process?

I’ll address that question in my next blog post. So stay tuned.
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Khalid Hakim is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice. You can follow him on Twitter @KhalidHakim47.

VMworld-graphicAnd if you’re heading to VMworld, don’t miss Khalid’s session!

Accelerate Your IT Transformation — How to Build Service-based Cost Models with VMware IT Business Management (ITBM)
A recent VMware survey showed 75% of IT decision makers list the number one challenge in IT financial management as lack of understanding of the true cost of IT services. ITBM experts and VMware Operations Transformation Architects Khalid Hakim and Gary Roos shed light on this alarming figure, and give practical advice for obtaining in-depth knowledge of the cost of IT services so you can provide cost transparency back to the business.

When you visit the VMworld 2014 Schedule Builder, be sure to check out the SDDC > Operations Transformation track for these and other sessions to help you focus on all the aspects of IT transformation.

Does IT Financial and Business Management Matter When Implementing Your Cloud?

 By Khalid Hakim

This is one of the common questions that I keep getting from my clients when building IT operations transformation roadmaps. In fact, one of the key considerations of a transformation roadmap is the business management side of your cloud, which often gets deprioritized by key stakeholders.

Let’s think it through: Can you tell me on the spot what your total cloud spend is, and, what that spend is comprised of? Here’s another one:  What’s the cost for you to deliver a unit of infrastructure as a service (IaaS)? And what about your consumers: Who consumes what service and at what cost?

Can you identify the services used and the cost allocation for each service? How is your cost efficiency compared to that of other public cloud infrastructures? How can you use that type of information to optimize the cost of your existing and future operations? How can you create a showback report to each of your stakeholders?

Let’s say that you’re the VP of Cloud Infrastructure — think through how you would justify your data center investments. Have you proactively analyzed demand vs. capacity along with operations cost of your cloud services?  How can you scale dynamically to fulfill your consumer needs? Have you thought about your goal to optimize the cost of delivering cloud services? Don’t you need closer monitoring to the quality of your delivery, such as continuous analysis and improvement?

(I can hear you thinking, enough with the questions already…)

If you are the IT financial manager, imagine how you can reduce your long-term commitments by moving from CAPEX to OPEX if appropriate. With financial and business management capabilities, your planning and IT budgeting would be based on actual cloud service demand and consumption practices. You would also be able to leverage benchmarking and “what if” scenarios for your cloud service costing optimization opportunities.

What keeps CIOs awake at night during a cloud implementation is the challenge of how they will demonstrate and deliver value for the cloud investment, as well as contribute as an innovator to the business by dynamically supporting growth and transformation as a result of their cloud cost optimization.

In fact, your ability to respond at the speed of business through fact-based decision making and responsiveness to changing needs in a dynamic environment is key to your success. The transparency of your cloud delivery value in context of demand, supply, cost, and quality will help improve your alignment with business goals to cloud services delivered.

In my next blog, I’ll cover some of the built-in functionality and business disciplines of the VMware IT Business Management Suite that can help you succeed in your cloud delivery and accelerate time to value.

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Khalid Hakim is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice. You can follow him on Twitter @KhalidHakim47.

VMworld-graphicCheck out the VMworld 2014 Operations Transformation track for opportunities to hear from experienced VMware experts, practitioners, and the real-world experiences of customers transforming their IT infrastructure and operational processes.