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Tag Archives: DevOps Days

VMware CloudOps Is Heading to Silicon Valley DevOps Days

(Photo from DevOpsDays.org)

As you may have heard, we’ll be on-site in Santa Clara for this year’s DevOps Days, taking place tomorrow, June 21st and this Saturday, June 22nd. If you’re attending the conference, make sure to swing by our table to say hello and to learn more about VMware’s cloud operations solutions and services.

We’ll be live tweeting from the show floor with exclusive photos and videos, and we’ll also be covering the following sessions:

Day 1:

  • 10:15-10:45 – DevOps + Agile = Business Transformation
  • 12:00-12:30 – Leveling Up a New Engineer in a Devops Culture; Healthy Sustainability

Day 2:

  • 10:15-10:45 – Leading the Horses to Drink: A Practical Guide to Gaining Support and Initiating a DevOps Transformation
  • 11:30-12:00 – Analysis Techniques for Identifying Waste in Your Build Pipeline
  • 12:00-12:30 – Clusters, Developers and the Complexity in Infrastructure Automation

During each afternoon of DevOps Days, there are open spaces for attendees to propose sessions to present. Once these sessions have been selected, we’ll tweet the sessions we’ll be live-tweeting from.

We’re also giving away t-shirts at DevOps Days: follow us at @VMwareCloudOps during the conference and you could soon be the proud owner of one of these shirts:

We hope to see you at DevOps Days!

Follow @VMwareCloudOps on Twitter for future updates, and join the conversation by using the #CloudOps and #SDDC hashtags on Twitter.

DevOps and All The Other “Ops Religions”

By: Kurt Milne

I didn’t wake up yesterday thinking, “Today I’ll design a T-shirt for the DevOps Days event in Mountain View.”  But as it turns out – that is what happened.

Some thoughts on what went into my word cloud design:

1. DevOps is great. This will be my 4th year attending DevOps Days.  I get the organic, bottoms up nature of the “movement.” I’ve been on the receiving end of the “throw it over the wall” scenario. A culture of collaboration and understanding go a long way to address the shortcomings of swim lane diagrams, phase gate requirements and mismatch of incentives that hamper effective app lifecycle execution. Continuous deployment is inspirational, and the creativity and power of the DevOps tool chain is very cool.

2. EnterpriseOps is still a mighty force. I remember an EnterpriseOps panel discussion at DevOps Days 2010. The general disdain for ITIL, coming from a crowd that was high off of 2 days of Web App goodness at Velocity 2010, was palpable. The participant from heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar asked the audience to raise their hand if they had an IT budget of more than $100M. No hands went up in the startup-dominated audience. His reply – “We have a $100M annual spend with multiple vendors.” The awkward silence suggested that EnterpriseOps is a different beast. It was. It still is. There is a lot EnterpriseOps can learn from DevOps, but the problems dealing with massive scale and legacy are just different.

3. InfraOps, AppOps, Service Ops. This model developed by James Urquhart makes sense to me.  It especially makes sense in the era of Shape Shifting Killer Apps. We need a multi-tier model that addresses the challenges of running infrastructure (yes, even in the cloud era), the challenges of keeping the lights on behind the API in a distribute component SOA environment and the cool development techniques that shift uptime responsibility to developers, as pioneered by Netflix. Clear division of labor with separation of duties, and a bright light shining on the white space in between, is a model that seems to address the needs of every cloud era constituent.

4. Missing from this 3-tier model is ConsumerOps. Oops. Too late to update the shirt design. Many are consuming IT services offered by cloud service providers; there must be a set of Ops practices that help guide cloud consumption. Understanding and negotiating cloud vendor SLAs and architecting multiple AWS availability zones immediately come to mind. Being a service broker and including 3rd party cloud services as part of an integrate service catalog is another.

5. Tenant Ops. As far as I can tell, this term was coined by Kevin Lees and the Cloud Operations Transformation services team at VMware. See pages 17 and 21 in Kevin’s paper on Organizing for the Cloud. It includes customer relationship management, service governance, design and release, as well as ongoing management of services in a multi-tenant environment. VMware internal IT uses the term to describe what they do running our private cloud internally. They have a pie chart that shows the percentage of compute units allocated to different tenants (development, marketing, sales, customer support, etc). It works. It may be similar to ServiceOps in the three tier model, but feels different enough, with a focus on multi-tenancy and not API driven services, to deserves its own term.

6. Finally CloudOps. This term is meta. It encompasses many of the concepts and practices of all the others. This is a term that describes IT Operations in the Cloud Era. Not just in a cloud, or connected to a cloud. But in the cloud era. The distinction being that the “cloud era” is different than the “client server era,” and implies that many practices developed in the previous era no longer apply. Many still do. But dynamic service delivery models are a forcing function for operational change. That change is happening in five pillars of cloud ops: People, Process, Organization, Governance, and IT business.

So while some of the sessions at this year’s DevOps conference are focused on continuous deployment. I’d bet that all the topics of the “Ops religions” will be covered.  Hence the focus on the term CloudOps.

We’ll be live tweeting from DevOps next Friday. Follow us @VMwareCloudOps or join the discussion using the #CloudOps hashtag.

Consider joining the new VMUG CloudOps SIG or find out more about it during VMUG June 27th webcast.