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Monthly Archives: December 2014

What Metrics Should Be Measured for Change Management?

By Kai Holthaus

kai_holthaus-cropThat, of course, depends (favorite answer of consultants everywhere…). As an IT executive, start by asking yourself what you want to achieve. Once you select a critical success factor (CSF), key performance indicator (KPI) or associated metrics and start to report on those metrics, you will see two types of behavior within your IT organization.

Most of your employees will want to be good team players, and they will work to meet the desirable metrics (and avoid undesirable ones). For example, if you start reporting on the number of changes implemented without proper authorization (which could be discovered through configuration audits), and you start disciplining staff for implementing changes without authorization, you will see the number of unauthorized changes go down (in most cases). However, you will also find that some staff will try to game the system by implementing changes without proper authorization, then making it look as if (in your tracking system) they’d had the authorization.

Also keep in mind, that metrics can have unintended consequences. Sticking with the example of tracking (and trying to reduce) the number of unauthorized changes, you may be surprised to see the backlog of changes waiting to be approved grow, because your approval process was not yet ready to handle all the change that was going on in your environment. So, it’s a good practice to be prepared to adjust your metrics accordingly. This also applies to metrics that have been in place for a while. If you have driven the number of authorized changes to zero, and have held it there for the last 12 months, you may want to consider adjusting your focus to other issues (but don’t lose sight completely…unauthorized changes can quickly creep back in).

Finally, make sure that you can actually measure the things you need to measure to report on CSFs and KPIs. Setting a goal of no unauthorized changes is laudable but will remain a goal until you have found a way to detect unauthorized changes.

To conclude, here are some examples of KPIs to consider for your change management process:
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Kai Holthaus is a transformation consultant with VMware Accelerate Advisory Services and is based in Oregon.

Making IT Go Faster – Forrester Research Sheds Light on How

By Kurt Milne

kurtmilne-cropToday’s IT managers face increasing pressure to be more responsive and move faster. However, most IT organizations have built their IT organization to promote control and safety. People, process, and tools have traditionally been deployed to strictly limit change in order to optimize service quality and efficiency. In fact many of the most successful IT organizations have built their reputation by deploying elements of ITIL or other control frameworks to ensure critical system uptime.

Latest Forrester Research lays out a path forward for IT organizations that want to increase agility without losing control

orrester coverIt is easy to say – “Let’s use the cloud to move faster and be more responsive to the business.” But how do those with investment in ITIL, or who have thoughtfully developed process control methodologies, adapt to new demands for speed? Demands forcing IT to do things it may not be comfortable with? A new Forrester study based on interviews with 265 IT professionals in North America and Europe sheds some light on the best path forward.

Forrester found that:

  • IT organizations are quickly moving to on-demand, dynamic IT infrastructure
  • Users demand faster provisioning and want IT to be easy to consume
  • Those companies that have already deployed more dynamic change models are moving away from a centralized CMDB strategy
  • Developers are the primary consumers of ready-to-use application middleware stacks
  • IT can support rapid change without sacrificing configuration, compliance, and governance controls

If you have investment in IT process maturity and are looking to improve IT agility and deploy more automation without sacrificing control, then read the full Forrester report.
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Follow @kurtmilne on Twitter.

Transforming Operations and Perception of the IT Organization

By David Crane

dcrane-cropA recent engagement with a long-established telecommunications firm presented a huge challenge—the solution for which is a great example of how operations transformation can drive technical transformation. The firm’s customer base spans various global regions, each of which presented a different customer experience. The IT organization functioned in extremely siloed environments, having grown organically over 25 years to support an aging, fragmented infrastructure.

A frustrated but motivated CIO laid down the following requirements for the VMware consulting services team, to be met over an aggressive six-month timeline:

  • Reduce operational costs
  • Improve agility
  • Provide more service offerings
  • Help IT become a service broker and eliminate shadow IT
  • Build a flexible architecture to meet the needs of the business
  • Reduce total number of physical data centers
  • Gain more control and compliance of IT infrastructure environments

The internal IT team lacked the expertise and resources required to implement a software-defined data center (SDDC) solution. Their service request process was time-consuming, manual, and inconsistent. Add to that an average provisioning time for a full end-to-end server of eight weeks, and it’s no surprise that internal customers were seeking out external solution providers for their IT needs.

The VMware team set out to remedy all of this with the following solution:

  • Implement a production SDDC platform
  • Make self-service automated provisioning the first available service
  • Assess the customers’ operating processes
  • Introduce an optimized organizational structure
  • Integrate operations transformation and technical implementation
  • Take a phased approach to the project with clearly defined milestones to deliver immediate results
  • Ensure the VMware team team worked closely with internal groups

Transforming the Operating Model
Breaking down the siloed IT organization, and introducing horizontal, cross-departmental communications was the first step to allow the customer to become service-focused.

The team did have the business analyst concept, but the analysts sat outside the IT organization. They didn’t understand IT and weren’t incentivized to do so. As a result, rogue users were going out and doing things themselves, leading to compliance and governance issues.

We introduced the concept of infrastructure operations and tenant operations. These were cross-functional teams that talk to each other—a virtual center of excellence within the IT organization. As part of this organizational change, we brought in new roles, the two most important being the customer relationship manager and the service owner. We brought customer relationship management back into IT, so the person in the role started to understand IT and what they could deliver (and how) against customer requirements.

One of these requirements was the revelation that customers did not really have an interest in availability.  This was not because they didn’t care, but simply because IT over the years has become robust enough that availability is expected.  What their customers really cared about was the speed, and standardization, of the service provisioning lifecycle, as it was this that allowed them to quickly respond to market demands, and support the business objective to be the first to market with new products.

This led to a technical requirement as the IT organization’s customers requested to see this information in a dashboard format, so that proactive monitoring of the provisioning process could take place.

Transforming Infrastructure Operations
The service owners played a key role in saying VMware vRealize Operations only looks at infrastructure—this resulted in a demand to change things within VMware vRealize Automation.

However, the dashboards needed to be delivered through vRealize Operations. To meet the technical requirement, we focused on the self-service provisioning portal and allowed consumers to monitor the status of their ordered services via that portal. To do that, we needed a dashboard in VMware vRealize Operations to monitor the KPIs involved in service provisioning. In order to build the dashboard to monitor provisioning time, we had to create a custom solution using vRealize Automation. The technical solution was necessary to enable the operating framework architecture and organizational model to support it.

Dashboard Solution
We ended up with a provisioned resources dashboard as shown in figure 1 below that lists each virtual machine (VM) and the number of minutes it took to be provisioned. Less than 30 minutes shows green, less than two hours shows yellow, and over two hours is red. It also shows the average, minimum, and maximum times to provision.

Time to Provision

Figure 1:  Provisioned resources dashboard

The dashboard also enabled the customer to use data to feed back into the service life cycle process. For example, they started to understand service demand. Service owners—who were expected to forecast demand for services—could now do so with more accuracy. Now that the team was forecasting capacity demand more accurately, they were able to increase credibility by sharing this information with the infrastructure team. And ultimately they saved money by having a better handle on demand.

The dashboard also allowed IT to develop proactive operational processes.  On several occasions the service owners started to see a degradation in performance of the provisioning process, while the infrastructure monitoring dashboards were still showing a healthy ecosystem.

On further analysis, changes to the underlying infrastructure, whilst keeping in tolerance and SLA for the IT infrastructure teams, were having an accumulative impact further down the chain to the service provisioning process.

The provisioning dashboard and further integration with the customers’ service desk platform and event, incident, and problem management processes allowed the IT infrastructure teams to tune the change management process so that service provisioning would not be affected.

In the end, IT became service-oriented because of the dashboard. Because internal customers could use that tool to see the incredible accuracy with which the IT team was meeting its 30-minutes-or-less goal, it had a huge impact on the way the IT was perceived within business. IT’s credibility skyrocketed, and suddenly it became easier to drive things like the “cloud first” policy within the organization.

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David Crane is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice and is based in the U.K.

How to Avoid 5 Common Mistakes When Implementing an SDDC Solution

By Jose Alamo

Jose alamo-cropImplementing a software-defined data center (SDDC) is much more than implementing or installing a set of technology — an SDDC solution requires clear changes to the organization vision, policies, processes, operations, and organization readiness. Today’s CIO needs to spend a good amount of time understanding the business needs, the IT organization’s culture, and how to establish the vision and strategy that will guide the organization to make the adjustments required to meet the needs of the business.

The software-defined data center is an open architecture that impacts the way IT operates today. And as such, the IT organization needs to create a plan that will utilize the investments in people, process, and technology already made to deliver both legacy and new applications while meeting vital IT responsibilities. Below is a list of five common mistakes that I’ve come across working with organizations that are implementing SDDC solutions, and my recommendations on how avoid their adverse impacts:

1. Failure to develop the vision and strategy—including the technology, process, and people aspects
Many times organizations implement solutions without setting the right expectation and a clear direction for the program. The CIO must use all the resources available within the IT organization to create a vision and strategy, and in some cases it is necessary to bring in external resources that have experience in the subject. The vision and strategy must align with the business needs, and it should identify the different areas that must be analyzed to ensure a successful adoption of an SDDC solution.

In my experience working with clients, it is imperative that as part of the planning a full assessment is conducted, and it must include the areas of people, process, and technology. A SWOT analysis should also be completed to fully understand the organization’s strengths,  weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. Armed with this insight, the CIO and IT team will be able to express the direction that must be taken to be successful, including the changes required across people, process, and technology.

Failing to complete this step will add complexity and lack of clarity for those who will be responsible for implementing the solution.

2. Limited time spent reviewing and understanding the current policies
There are often many policies within the IT organization that can prevent moving forward with the implementation of SDDC solutions. In such cases, the organization needs to have an in-depth review of the current policies governing the business and IT day-to-day operations. The IT team also needs to ensure it devotes a significant amount of time with the company’s security and compliance team to understand their concerns and what measures need to be taken to make the necessary adjustments to support the implementation of the solutions. For example, the IT organization needs to look at its change policies; some older policies could prevent the deployment of process automation that is key to the SDDC solution. When these issues are identified from the beginning, IT can start the negotiation with the lines of business to either change its policies or create workarounds that will allow the solution to provide the expected value.

Performing these activities at the beginning of the project will allow IT leadership to make smart choices and avoid delays or workarounds when deploying future SDDC solutions.

3. Lack of maturity around the IT organization’s service management processes
The software-defined data center redefines IT infrastructure and enables the IT organization to combine technology and a new way of operating to become more service-oriented and more focused on business value. To support this transformation, mature service management processes need to be established.

After the assessment of current processes, the IT organization will be able to determine which process will require a higher level of maturity, which process will need to be adapted to the SDDC environment, and which processes are missing and will need to be established in order to support the new environment.

Special attention will be required for the following processes:  financial management, demand management, service catalog management, service level management, capacity management, change management, configuration management, event management, request fulfillment, and continuous service improvement.

Ensure ownership is identify for each process, with KPIs and measurable metrics established—and keep the IT team involved as new processes are developed.

4. Managing the new solution as a retrofit within the current environment
Many IT organizations will embrace a new technology and/or solution only to attempt to retrofit it into their current operational model. This is typically a major mistake, especically if the organization is expecting better efficiency, more flexibility, lower cost to operate, transparency, and tighter compliance as potential benefits from an SDDC.

Organizations must assess their current requirements and determine if they will be required for the new solutions. Most processes, roles, audit controls, reports, and policies are in place to support the current/legacy environment, and each must be assessed to determine its purpose and value to the business, and to determine whether it is required for the new solution.

IT leadership should ask themselves: If the new solution is going to be retrofitted into the current operational model, then why do we need a new solution?  What business problems are we going to resolve if we don’t change the way we operate?

My recommendation to my clients is to start lean, minimize the red tape, reduce complex processes, automate as much as possible, clearly identify new roles, implement basic reporting, and establish strict change policies. The IT organization needs to commit to minimize the number of changes to the new solution to ensure only changes that are truly required get implemented.

5. No assessment of the IT organization’s capabilities and no plan to fill the skill set gaps
The most important resource to the IT organization is its people. IT management can implement the greatest technologies, but their organizations will not be successful if their people are not trained and empowered to operate, maintain, and enhance the new solution.

The IT organization needs to first assess current skill sets. Then work with internal resources and/or vendors to determine how the organization needs to evolve in order to achieve its desired state. Once that gap has been identified, the IT management team can develop an enablement plan to begin to bridge the gap. Enablement plans typically include formal “train the trainer” models to cascade knowledge within the organization, as well as shadowing vendors for organizational insight and guidance along with knowledge transfer sessions to develop self-sufficiency. In some cases it may be necessary to bring in external resources to augment the IT team’s expertise.

In conclusion, implementing a software-defined data center solution will require a new approach to implementing processes, technologies, skill sets, and even IT organizational structures. I hope these practical tips on how to avoid common mistakes will help guide your successful SDDC solution implementations.

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Jose Alamo is a senior transformation consultant with VMware Accelerate Advisory Services and is based in Florida. Follow Jose on Twitter @alamo_jose  or connect on LinkedIn.