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Monthly Archives: November 2011

VMware is Hiring – SlideRocket

 As a society we are more mobile, social, and collaborative than ever due to the Internet and its continuous evolution. The Internet has without a doubt changed the way we all work. Hear how the SlideRocket team is revolutionizing the way presentation software is made and used on the web.

 

 Do you have the desire to be an important part of the growth and success of the SlideRocket Company? Do you have great communication skills and have a love for what you try accomplish within your work? Be a part of this growing company and its journey to success.

 Check out the links below to apply and find out more about what it's like working at VMware. 

Current SlideRocket job openings: http://ow.ly/7HEoM 

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VMware Foundation – Employees Give Back – The Santa Clara County Open Space Authority

Dex1On September 27th, 2011 eight individuals from our Palo Alto headquarters participated in a day of service by volunteering with the Santa Clara County Open Space Authority (SCCOSA). The Santa Clara County Open Space Authority's primary goal is to help preserve undeveloped land in its natural state. For the SCCOSA, achieving this goal requires an approach that combines acquiring lands and overseeing them in a sound ecological manner.

 VMware employees, Michael Pritchard, Jeff Friend, Brian Corbin, Christopher E. Lewis, Tamera Scholz, Dana Nourie, Anjana Dasu and Dexter Arver helped the SCCOSA by removing old fences that were no longer necessary since the land is now under the SCCOSA's protection. By removing these fences the animals that live on the preserve have greater freedom to roam about, and it also makes the ridge much more visually appealing. Dex6

Dexter Arver, the individual who spearheaded this service learning day chose to partner with the SCCOSA due to his personal love of hiking and walking the various open space trails around the bay area. Due to the encroachment of various human activities, these areas of land are very fragile. It turns out that the land that these VMware employees helped remove the fence on is so delicate that the SCCOSA does not currently have plans to open trails on this preserve. Members of the SCCOSA indicated that if the population of indigenous plants and wildlife were to climb back up, they would consider opening trails to the public. Dex3

When asked to give his thoughts on the VMware Foundation and the Service Learning initiative here at VMware, Dexter indicated that the program is great because it forces us all to think about what we really care about in life, and the ways in which we would personally like to give back to our community.

 

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VMware Intern Prodigy – Mentor Experience

  Liang Song

 An internship can be a difficult time of transition. For many of you reading this blog post, next summer will be the first time you have left the safe confines of academia and ventured into the world of deadlines and responsibilities. In other words — you’ll be taking on your first real job. And like anything you do for the first time, you walk in with trepidation and cautious optimism, wondering how everything works. You’ll have a million questions and you’ll want to ask them faster than Eminem can rap. If only there was someone who can answer them all for you. Ladies and gents…presenting Exhibit A — your very own personal VMware mentor.

 Before we delve into the wonderful luxury of having a mentor, let’s talk about me first. I started my first internship with VMware in the summer of 2010, working as a member of the Quality Assurance team. It was my first real taste of the working world, and frankly, I was quite lost. But I had a great mentor who figuratively held my hand through the summer, and I ended the internship on a high note. Fast-forward a year later. I was back at VMware for a second summer stint, this time with a completely different department. I had made a soul-enlightening revelation as I had discovered what I really wanted to do, write. So I signed on to help VMware push out their vSphere 5.0 product as a summer intern for technical publications.

 Same company, different job. Another million questions I needed answered. Enter Wendy Shaffer, VMware staff technical writer — my mentor for summer 2011. The person who arguably saved my entire summer from crashing down in a fiery blaze. So what did I do this past summer?

 I wrote Knowledge Base articles. See, when a customer that’s using a VMware product gets stumped for whatever reason, he calls tech support. There’s a back-and-forth question and answer session and hopefully, at some point, the issue is resolved. The better alternative is for said customer to visit VMware’s online repository of useful information called the VMware Knowledge Base. Here, you can type in the keywords of a symptom and chances are there will be a well-written article with all your answers. How convenient, right? So I wrote over a hundred KB articles in anticipation for the big vSphere 5.0 summer release, and Wendy was there for every single one.

 Right off the bat, we established a good working relationship. We had to. Countless VMware customers will read these KBs, so a poorly written article could very well bring the company grief. It didn’t help that a level of polish and clarity was often missing when a clueless intern drafts them. So twice a week, an hour at a time, Wendy would waltz over to my cubicle and we would sit there, reading what I wrote earlier that week. It wasn’t just her comments on my writing style that helped improve my work, it was also the way she approached an engineer’s request to document a KB article. I remember, on more than a few occasions, sitting there with my hands pulling on my hair as I tried in vain to understand what a developer wrote in the KB request form. It was a disheartening feeling, the one you get when you’re at your wit’s end. But Wendy was always there to go “Aha! I think I can explain this! Here goes nothing!” Again — the person who saved my entire summer.

 But it goes beyond that. Wendy approached her mentoring with a laissez-faire approach, and this is something you need to understand — your mentor is not your boss. She is there to guide you and be a helping hand in times of great need. In my case, it seemed like this time was every other day. But what she was not there to do was boss you around. In many ways, Wendy was like a big sister who knew the right answers and always brought a calming presence to a hectic day. We also bonded on a personal level and discovered we both had a passion for fantasy and science fiction novels. In fact, we still keep in touch, and will be meeting up for FOGcon, an annual literary-themed Sci-fi/Fantasy convention, next April.

 So there you have it — a portrait of a typical VMware summer intern and his mentor. It was a great experience, and something that may very well be unique to VMware. I remember the CEO, Paul Maritz, telling us interns about how committed VMware is to the internship program because it’s a commitment to the future. That’s why we all have a mentor, no exceptions — someone you can go to when you’re at your lowest moment. Someone who can help you better yourself and further your career at VMware.

About Liang:

Liang has worked as a MTS: QA Intern during the summer of 2010, and as a MTS: Technical Publications Intern for vSphere 5.0 during the summer of 2011. He received his B.S.E.E. from San Jose State University in 2009, and is currently finishing up his M.S.E.E. at San Jose State University. In his spare time, he enjoys a good laugh or two.

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Career Tip from a VMware Recruiter: Following up for a Job Opening

Carla

 

 Are you too aggressive or worse too passive?

In today’s high unemployment and economic uncertainty many people are looking for a job. When looking for a new job there are definitely some tools you need to have in your back pocket; like a good resume, interviewing skills, networks to contact, social media exposure, etc… However, there are also certain rules to following up with employers and recruiters once you have applied.

What is the happy medium to following up for the job?

First be careful not to go overboard on the follow up. Second don’t be so passive in waiting for the employer and recruiters to come to you. Being too aggressive will spook the employer/recruiter or worse get you on the employer’s desperate list. On the flip side, being too passive could lead to someone else getting the job before you. 

Protocols for follow up

  • Pick up the phone and leave a nice concise thank you message along with a short email thanking them for their time while tastefully reiterating your interest.
  • Remember, managers and recruiters are inundated with calls and emails, so mixing up how you reach out to them once or twice a week is typically enough. That is unless they are engaging with you and need more information. If so, be prompt at responding. Also, when you do connect or reach out to them be sure that your message is cleaver and grabs their attention. There is a lot of competition out there so be skillful and purposeful in what you say.  Take heed and be careful not to be too overzealous, pushy, or worse sound frustrated that they haven’t got back to you. Note: Try not to say the same things over and over again in your messages or calls.
  • Know your target company – Everyone should know how important it is to know what your target company does. This method of preparing for an interview is essential. However, did you know that continuing to keep up with what they do is also important? Invest more time researching what the company is moving towards, news articles, white pages, twitter, new product lines, etc.  That way when you do present yourself again you have material to use that shows you can add value to the employer. Attach an industry or functional article, especially an article about competitors, or what could be useful information for them in an email. Note: Use this material on decision makers. 
  • Know who you are talking with and more about their professional background, so you have more to talk about when you do reconnect. Don’t waste their time with idle nervous chatter, but rather show interest in what is relevant to what they are interested in. 
  • Connect to your networks in the company or someone who knows someone in the company and start collecting a pool of people that know you, your professional skills, and work history; then ask them to talk you up to the decision makers (another form of follow-up). 
  • Know the signs and be intuitive. If someone you are following up with sounds disinterested and/or cuts you short, it may be time to move on to the next job opportunity and not waste your time with following up. Your time is valuable too.
  • Mirror yourself to the person you are talking to….not exact duplication, but rather try and stay in tuned with who you are talking to. If the person on the other side of the phone or in person is energetic and assertive be that, if the person is a bit reserved be somewhat reserved, but show interest.  Be careful not to sound so giddy or overly enthusiastic that it appears you are jumping up and down and flapping your arms trying to get their attention. Once you have their attention use it wisely. 
  • Don’t sit back and wait for the job to fall in your lap. Being too passive in a job search by just applying online hoping for results does not get you noticed for the job. Even though most companies do ask that you apply online that is only the beginning. If you are interested in a job opportunity with them don’t stop there. 
  • To get a job these days you need to hit the pavement in “old sales school” terms. Meaning get out there and meet people, connect through all the tools available to you via the Internet outside of the career site.  Stand out in the crowd by educating yourself on what is happening in the market with your target audience and use some of the “follow-up protocol” techniques mentioned above to help.
  • Finally… never stop trying or give up. Finding a job in this market takes time, patience, hard work, and lots and lots of effort. Think positive and present yourself positively, so that others see your strength and ability to keep moving forward and eventually all you efforts will pay off.

 

About Carla:

Sr. Recruiter, Resource Management, Sourcing Specialist, and Staffing Consultant, with over 20 years of experiencing focusing on helping companies find talent for the Information Technology and Energy Industries.  Seasoned, multitasking, determined individual that is driven to successful execution in all phases of delivery. Strategist and innovator of new recruiting techniques, lead generation, processes and market trending. 

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Current job reqs that Carla is working on:

Sr. Mac Software EngineerVMware View (Desktop View Client Team) Job 

Sr. Networking & Security EngineerVMware View (Desktop View Client Team) Job

The View client team brings View desktops to all of your devices. Going forward we have set our sights on being a client for other cloud resources as well. Our Desktop client team is looking for a Mac developer as well as someone to focus on secure connection subsystems.

 

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VMware is Hiring – Inside Sales Representatives

 Our latest videos highlight the Inside Sales Team from our Austin, Texas office. Hear about what it is like to work in this dynamic fast-paced environment while living in such an eclectic city from several of our Sales Managers and Inside Sales Representatives.

 For the ISR Team, each quarter is the most important quarter of their lives. Are you up for the challenge of aggressively finding business and closing it?

 

  

 Check out the links below to apply and find out more about what it's like working at VMware. 

Current Inside Sales Representatives job openings: http://ow.ly/7BV6b 

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VMware Foundation – Employees Give Back – The World Computer Exchange

Finished_pallet Last week, I organized a day of service for the Cambridge office employees at the World Computer Exchange headquarters. Several people in the Cambridge office had expressed an interest in applying their existing technical skills and knowledge in a volunteer capacity. After some searching, I connected with the World Computer Exchange, and I knew it would be the perfect place for a day of service.

 World Computer Exchange refurbishes used computers and sends them abroad to schools and community organizations in the developing world. Their mission is to improve access to technology amongst children in the poorest of communities around the globe. Their need for volunteers is critical. They rely on volunteers with technical skills to diagnose and repair computers and to pre-load computers with Linux and educational software. Luckily for me, they also need non-technical volunteers to help organize equipment and palletize for shipping.  

 Fifteen volunteers from the Cambridge office participated, and we had a great cross-section from all different departments within the office. One of the best aspects of service days is being able to meet new people and bond through teamwork. The World Computer Exchange Director, Timothy, pronounced us to be the most efficient group of volunteers they ever hosted. Several computers, even some that had been pronounced dead, were brought back to life thanks to our very skillful volunteers! Three_working

 We also assembled four pallets of equipment that will be shipped to schools and orphanages in Tanzania. I am so proud of all that we were able to accomplish in one day, and I am already planning another day of service in the near future. Many of the Cambridge office employees who missed out on this day  have been asking when the next one will be so that they can be sure to join. I am also so grateful to the VMware Foundation for providing us with five days each year to apply towards volunteer work. It is a wonderful thing to give back, and I know many people were especially pleased to be giving back in a way that utilized their existing skill sets so effectively. 

About Susie: 

Susie2 Susie is an Engineering Administrative Assistant at the VMware Cambridge, Massachusetts office.

 

 

 

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2011 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing Conference – Takeaways

 Recently, Felicia Jadczak (VMAP Project Analyst) and Alicia Schetter (Sr. University Relations Specialist) spent time in beautiful Portland, Oregon at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference. The purpose of this conference (“GHC”) is to highlight the research and career interests of women in computing. The theme of this year’s conference was “What If…?” This year’s GHC conference had 2,908 attendees, representing a 35% increase in attendance from last year. Of the 1,136 student attendees, 201 were scholarship students. Ghcsign  

 This is a premier event for women in technology from a professional development and recruitment perspective. Many of the industry leading companies who were in attendance participated in workshops, panel discussions and poster sessions, lending their knowledge and insights to conference attendees. In addition, many employers were represented at exhibitor/recruitment booths throughout the conference. For those in the “know” in the Tech field, this is the networking event of the year and both VMware attendees were thrilled to take part in such inspiring activities.

After a week spent with approximately 3,000 other women, both came away energized and invigorated. First and foremost though, Felicia was excited about:

  1. The realization that I was part of such a dynamic community, and
  2. Developing ideas and discussing ways in which VMware can be more active in supporting, encouraging, and mentoring our own women.

Alicia walked away feeling motivated to:

  1. Teach others about the benefits of ensuring a blend of diverse members on a project team, who will lend different perspectives on how to solve a problem…”diversity trumps when the problem is harder”
  2. Ensure VMware has an enormous presence at the GHC next year and shares in the process, along with other top employers, of assisting women in learning more about the different approaches one can take to create an amazing career in Tech.

Here are a few takeaways after some time spent at the conference:

  • There is a very engaged support community out there for women in our field. It can be easy to sometimes feel isolated, especially for those women who may be one of only a few (or the only) women on a team or in a department. This doesn’t have to be the case.
  • Men and women approach problems with different styles. This is not a bad thing, but it does mean that you might need to push your comfort zone. It’s great to be the ‘best-kept secret’ in your organization, but that can only get you so far. Promote your accomplishments!
  • If you never take risks, you’ll never know if you might have succeeded. Also, remember that experiencing failure is one of the best ways to learn.
  • Women attribute success to 1) working hard, 2) the help of others, 3) luck. Men attribute success to 1) themselves – no help needed! We’re different, we think differently – yeah, sure, but that doesn’t mean we can experience the same level of success. Let’s take credit for what we achieve.
  • Think about this…”what would you do if you weren’t afraid”? Imagine that incredible world! Keep in mind, however, “you can’t accomplish something, you never set out to do”. Make a goal for yourself and stick to it…then tell people about it.

We’ll close with some observations from GHC’s keynote, given by Sheryl Sandberg (COO at Facebook). Her top takeaways for women seeking growth in their careers in the Tech industry or in general are:

  1. Believe in yourself: “None of us have accomplished things we did not set out to do.”
  2. Dream big; close the ambition gap. Success is positively correlated with likeability for men, and negatively correlated with likeability for women. We need to make it less unusual for women to be in positions of power.
  3. Make your partner a real partner, or in other words, “Date the wrong guy, but don’t marry him.” 🙂
  4. Don’t leave before you leave. As in, don’t make decisions for right now based on in the future. Technology is the most flexible industry, bar none. We need to start taking more advantage of this!
  5. Start talking about this now. Women have come a long way, but we are nowhere near the finish line. We need to keep talking about how women can continue to climb the ranks, reach high roles within their companies and industries, and reach equality with male counterparts. As Sheryl put it, “what would you do if you weren’t afraid?” 

fbtechtalks on livestream.com. Broadcast Live Free 

 Next year’s conference theme is “Are we there yet?”  What do you think? The event will be held in Baltimore, Maryland. VMware will be in attendance with a booth and a full staff of engineers and recruitment experts happy to share insights on working in the industry and at VMware. For more information, check out the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing website!

About Felicia:

Felicia is a Project Analyst with the VMware Academic Program (VMAP). She originally joined VMware as an intern, and is excited to be working full time for such a great team and company. Felicia is responsible for managing VMAP’s academic conferences, and is a member of several internal project teams. In any spare time, she likes exploring Boston, catching up with friends, and supporting any and all Philadelphia sports teams.  

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 About Alicia:

 Sr. University Relations Specialist, Alicia Schetter, works to develop and maintain strategic partnerships with students and staff at top universities throughout the U.S.  She came to VMware after spending 3 years with salesforce.com as a University Recruiting Program Manager. Her last position with sfdc included managing the UR strategy and team. Prior to that experience, she spent time in the world of academia as Associate Director of MBA Career Services at UW – Madison and at Miller Brewing Company as a University Recruiting Team member. She feels the most rewarding part of her job is taking on the role of counselor and assisting students in making some of their first (and most important) career decisions. Originally from the Midwest, she has been happily residing in San Francisco the last 4 years. Alicia holds a Bachelor’s degree in Organizational Communication and Master’s in Human Resources and Labor Relations.

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Job Seekers: Resume Blasts are a Thing of the Past

 GilOakes It’s a totally different employment market today than just a few years ago. The days of emailing your resume against a job posting and crossing your fingers are long gone.

Here are a few suggestions I make to those that are early on in their plans to make a career move:

  • Take the time to get inside yourself and take an inventory of the things you like to do, as well as what you don’t like to do. You’d be surprised at how many people know more about what they DON’T like to do than what they do.
  • Once you’ve got an idea what your strengths are and what it is you’re after in your next position, focus on putting together a target list of companies you’d like to research.
  • Forget about just thinking about this on a job level. Find a company whose culture and values match your own…and in the long run you’ll be most happy. Ask yourself; is this a company that I can prosper in? Are my skills applicable? Am I a good cultural fit? Is this a place I can lace up my shoes and head off to every day?
  • I recommend putting together a list of 10-15 of these companies, and then develop a plan on how and who you’re going to talk or meet with there.

Notice I said talk! Yes, picking up the phone is difficult for some people, but you can’t win if you don’t play.

  • Take advantage of all of the social media tools at hand—LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Google+ & Branchout…just to name a few. These are great places to meet and network with people at the companies you are targeting for your next career move.
  • Start growing and networking in your own circle. Who’s going to be a better advocate for you then the people you already know? You don’t need to blast it out to everyone, but pick the most influential people you know, and carve out the time to meet with them. Ask those in your network for introductions to others.
  • While social networking is very useful, don’t rely solely on it thinking those job offers will just appear in your Twitter feed. Nothing replaces a good old fashion call or meet up for coffee.

There’s no cookie cutter/one size fits all method to landing that dream job, so don’t be afraid to mix it up and try new things. It really is about building solid relationships and growing a tight network.

About Gil: 
Gil is a VMware Program Manager who specializes in Strategic Staffing & Research.


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VMware Intern Prodigy – Internship Experience

ViruKanjilal

 

 Summer of 2011 has been one of the most fulfilling and rewarding summers I have had till date. I spent the summer at the Palo Alto campus of VMware interning with the vCenter Server team. On the orientation day I met Linda Condon (Intern Program Manager), BeeJae Visitacion (recruiter) and others. It was nice to put faces to the names I had been seeing in emails for the months leading up to the internship. Linda laid down the calendar for the summer and it was sure to be exciting as it was littered with tech talks, baseball games, bocce ball, intern kick off and the likes.

 I got my first chance to meet the other fellow interns at VMware at the ice cream social. It was about a week into my internship when Linda rounded up the interns in the middle of the day for some delicious ice cream. We had the intern kickoff event within a few weeks and it was really fun. One weekday, after wrapping up some work, my mentor led me to the soccer field, which already had a festive mood. All the interns were already present and we were divided into five teams. Each team played various games against each other in the sun for a grand prize of a "gold" medal. The competitions carried on throughout the entire summer in the form of the service-learning program, which was indeed the best activity I took part in.

 Service learning provided me an opportunity to do something different over the summer. Each of the intern groups was assigned to a group working towards the betterment of the society. Our team was assigned to City Year, San Jose. City Year provides critical services to the in-need youths and neighborhoods. VMware was generous enough to give the interns time off from work to go and serve at these places. Since a new school session would start after the summer, plenty of help was required in making ready the application forms, creating labels, creating and updating student records, etc. Our team members fixed dates when we car-pooled and visited their center. There we helped out the folks at City Year to prepare for the upcoming session.

 VMware has a huge array of highly innovative products and the regular tech talks were helpful in giving us an insight into these products. The tech talks mostly happened in the afternoons and employees from different groups within VMware would present the technologies and products that they work on. Sometimes senior executives would drop by these talks. Interacting with them and getting to know the vision they have for the company was very interesting to me.

 Each building at VMware had its own foosball and table tennis tables where we used to chill out in between work from time to time. The fully loaded snack bar with all-you-can-have snacks and drinks were also a place the interns could be often found hanging out. In spite of these “attractions” I patiently waited for the beer bash we had every Friday evening. It was a time to socialize with other interns and full timers over beer, wine and array of food from a variety of cuisines.

 VMware really encourages innovation and creativity.  The intern fling contest is such an example. The contest was open to all the interns with a simple task of creating an application based on Cloud Foundry – the VMware’s cloud offering. I had a lot of fun learning about this new technology as I came up with an interesting app to analyze employee efficiency at VMware.

 I could go on and on about the amazing activities I did at VMware including the baseball game we went to, or the YouTube video project, the comedy show, or the casino night, but one thing is for sure that the internship program at VMware is highly engaging. Apart from performing technologically challenging assignments, I took part in a number of activities, which were not only enjoyable, but at the same time very rewarding. I made great friends during my stay at VMware and I truly believe it is one of the best places for a student to intern.

About Viru:

Viru is a Ph.D Student at the University of Florida.

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VMware Recruiter Chat LIVE: The Evolution of VMware & Recruiting

Join us tomorrow, November 16th, at 3:00 PM EST for our live VMware Careers Livestream episode of VCTV (VMware Careers TV). Will Staney, VMware Careers Social Media Manager, will be sitting down with VMware recruiter, Liz Bronson to discuss the evolution of VMware and recruiting within our company.

Have a question regarding where VMware is as a company today and how we recruit? During the live episode, you can tweet in questions regarding the discussion for either Will or Liz to @VMwareCareers with the hashtag #VCTV in the text. At the end of the episode, Price Smith, VMware’s Social Recruiting Community Manger will select questions from Twitter to bring to the table for an open discussion.

Watch Liz Bron’s interview here.

About Liz:

LizBronson

 

Liz is a Senior Recruiter focused on Product Management and Product Marketing positions in our Cloud and Application Services group.  Since starting at VMware in 2005, Liz has recruited for tech support, and product management/product marketing for the infrastructure, desktop and cloud teams.

Before coming to VMware, Liz was an HR Generalist and Recruiter at Barclays Global Investors in San Francisco.  Before that, she was an elementary school teacher.  Liz often says that working with hiring managers isn’t much different than wrangling a class of 3rd graders- they just have larger vocabularies.

Liz now lives in Austin, TX with her husband, two children and Cockapoo Darby who she used to bring into the Palo Alto office when she worked there.

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