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Tag Archives: private cloud

Why the “3 Cs” Are Vital to IT When Deploying a Private Cloud

By Joe Chenevey

JChenevey_1Last year, a colleague and I worked with an enterprise IT organization to develop a private cloud strategy. As with many other enterprise IT organizations we’ve worked with, this organization was faced with customers demanding IT infrastructure faster than traditional methods were allowing and increasingly looking outside internal IT. The organization wanted to provide its internal customer base with a viable alternative to creating workloads in the public cloud (where IT has both less visibility and control).

After spending months planning, developing, and testing a private cloud-based infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) offering, the IT team met their objective of reducing time to provision and overall request fulfillment times by well over 50 percent. A great achievement for their first release. During a follow-up meeting with our client earlier this year, we learned that after putting the service into production, the IT team fully expected requests for IaaS to coming flooding in from their user base. After all how many times have we all heard, “If you build it, they shall come…” presumed when it comes to private cloud? Unfortunately for our client, it didn’t happen that way.

Cloud Transformation Success InfographicHere’s why: our client overlooked a seemingly low-impact but in fact very important step of our guidance —Internal Sales & Marketing — #6 in a recent interactive infographic — describing seven key pieces of cloud transformation.

This particular enterprise IT organization neglected to engage its internal customers regularly to create awareness of what problems their IT organization had solved, details of the overall IaaS solution that would interest customers, and the benefits to the internal customer base.  Often my clients don’t fully realize that without repeated communications to their prospective user base, it will be difficult to generate the demand necessary to achieve the inherent benefits that come with the utility or scale of a cloud model.

If you want your internal customer base to use your new private cloud and also demonstrate the value your IT organization can provide with that model, remember the 3 Cs:

  1. Communicate (Before): Before you start addressing the architecture and design of a private cloud solution, your strategy should include developing a communication plan.  Your communication plan addresses when, where, how, and how often you will communicate to your potential user base, but it also provides an early description of the new private cloud services, new capabilities, customer benefits, and release timelines. This communication plan serves as the basis for your internal sales and marketing efforts.
  2. Communicate (During): As you go through the service development process, you must continue to promote—market—the services to your potential user base in order to keep up interest and potential demand. I also advise you to identify potential early adopters to help develop and refine the service during development. Early adopter buy-in also generates good word of mouth and demonstrates your new service-oriented approach to delivering IT.
  3. Communicate (After): After you’ve tested and piloted your new private cloud service and are ready to release it into production, support the launch with an internal publicity campaign to create broad awareness of its availability to your prospective user base. I recommend using every means possible including: town halls, webcasts, email, enterprise social networks, and even information booths/kiosks in key locations.  And, provide information on how to request the service, and develop training for your users on how to engage. If you followed the first two Cs, this last C will be icing on the cake.

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Joe Chenevey is a business solutions architect with VMware Accelerate Advisory Services and is based in Oklahoma. You can follow him on Twitter @VIJoe_Chenevey.

Learn from VMware’s Lessons on Transforming the Business with Private Cloud

At VMware, the process of testing and optimizing products often starts by implementing them in our own IT organization. Join us tomorrow at 10am (PST) for a free webcast and get the inside scoop on lessons learned from moving VMware’s Dev/Test provisioning to private cloud.

Kurt Milne, VMware Director of Cloud Operations Marketing, will lead the conversation with executives from the VMware Dev/Ops team, who will share their personal experience with a private cloud environment that supports rapid prototyping and innovation that wasn’t possible before.

For the Ops team, blueprints, policies, and cloud automation and management have provided agility and improved performance. For the Dev team, requests for instances are completed in a day, their work is no longer interrupted while they wait for dev/test instances that hoard scarce infrastructure resources.

So, how does it add up? Learn the keys to how VMware’s IT organization reduced provisioning from four weeks to 24 hours, and improved the productivity of 600 developers by 20 percent.

Register here for “Increased Agility and Lower Cost Automated Provisioning in VMware’s Private Cloud.

Cloud, End-User Strategies Guard Against Data Breaches

Author: Alex Salicrup

The Fifth Estate hits theaters October 18, and with it a reminder of the corporate and government secrets exposed when WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange obtained breached classified data and released it to the world.

Assange and WikiLeaks, as we know, gained access to classified documents through US Army Private Bradley Manning, an intelligence analyst who was recently sentenced for espionage. In addition to this breach, there was Edward Snowden, the contractor for the National Security Agency (NSA) who outed the organization’s telecommunications monitoring programs.  — See related by Richard Rees on the VMware Consulting blog: The Snowden Leak: A Windfall for Hybrid Cloud?

In the 80s and 90s the spy scandals centered on individuals passing secrets to enemies of the state, like Aldrich Ames and Richard Hanssen, government employees who sold sensitive information to Russia for big bucks.

These days data breaches are more likely to be driven by a cause than cash. Widely described as hacktivism, breaches and malware attacks are made against corporations—not just governments—often by organizations that see themselves as the arbiters of online justice (like Anonymous). Two-thirds of all data breaches last year were made by installing malware on corporate systems. Almost all breaches were made from external sources.

Since its breach, the NSA, which already had plans to build a private cloud, has accelerated its implementation, largely because it sees automation as a key to eliminating the need for contractors like Snowden. In my experience, this is a good start, but only when it is followed by security policies focused on data classification rather than per application or system.

One of the advantages I see to software-defined networking is that it allows better visibility into where data, platforms, and infrastructure reside as part of the larger virtual infrastructure. The closer to a software-defined data center a corporation gets, the more control and visibility it has over its data security.

I was recently part of a deployment where the client designed innovative ways to classify and secure data, making it harder to breach, easier to monitor, and mostly automated. That’s a scalable solution that delivers enhanced security of precious data.

End-user computing (EUC) is another area where the right strategy needs to safeguard data accessible from devices that can potentially be accessed by someone besides the intended user. In my experience, if a company does not employ a comprehensive EUC solution, staff members will eventually bypass data security policies in order to have access data on their mobile devices.

Organizations will do well to start an internal assessment of how well-positioned they are to manage their data securely in the age of hactivism. Are there opportunities to enhance data security using virtual infrastructure and software-defined networking? Which is more cost effective and efficient? How much would a breach potentially cost? Is your organization capable of managing the infrastructure needed to support virtualization and EUC initiatives?

Let’s face it: No one expects to have their data breached. And yet, the majority of US corporations are victims to it every year. Why risk being one of them?

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Alex Salicrup is a business solutions architect for VMware Accelerate Advisory Services.