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Tag Archives: organizational change

IT Innovation has a Major Impact on Attracting – and Retaining – Talented Staff

Mark Sternerby Mark Sterner

When CIOs adopt leading technologies like self–service provisioning, software defined networks, cloud native applications, and mobile solutions, they’re typically motivated by the significant business efficiencies and agility that these new technologies can deliver.

Those are essential considerations, of course, but I’m going explore another, often overlooked, reason to upgrade to IT’s cutting edge: that the technology you deploy for internal use plays a major role in attracting – and retaining – talented staff that will transform your business to a digital enterprise.

You’re only as good as your talent, after all, and anything that frustrates them or otherwise drives your employees – especially the best ones – to think about jumping ship, is a problem you need to deal with.

Attracting Millennials

Attract Top TalentThis problem is becoming more urgent as Millennials join the workforce. Young people joining the workforce today have expectations of mobility, interoperability, ease of use, speed of technology upgrades, the consumerization of IT and more based on their experience with technology since grade school. With next year’s new hires, those expectations will only increase.

This has an even greater impact on companies that are making serious investments in customer-facing technology. I’ve heard young employees at a well known IT enterprise, for example, say, “I can’t believe I work for a tech company and I can’t get everything on my phone and that the applications are so slow and so hard to maneuver.”

I’ll write more about how Millennials are changing IT in my next post, but here I’ll just add that young people who arrive at companies with outdated internal IT are going to be looking to leave as soon as possible, bringing all the associated costs and delays that come with having to replace people who were performing well.

Retaining Top Talent

Of course, attracting and retaining talent isn’t just about your newest hires. I’ve also seen highly experienced employees motivated to move because they’re asked to work with outdated systems, processes, and tools. These employees know how much better they could be performing with better technologies at their disposal and are simply frustrated at dealing with antiquated infrastructure, manual processes, paper-based systems, and having to constantly put out fires instead of focusing on innovation.

This was made even more apparent to me when I worked with a large pharma company that spun off one of their divisions with a new greenfield approach to internal IT (but no real difference in their customer-facing business). They advertised jobs in the spin-off internally, and a large number of their best people jumped at the chance, leaving the parent company badly lacking in experience.

Ambitious IT professionals can be even harder to keep.  Those individuals take it on themselves to keep learning and pick up the very latest skills. If their company isn’t supporting their personal development because it has no ambition to deploy those technologies, employees will take that as a signal that they should be working elsewhere.

There’s one further cost to holding back on new technologies that future-oriented employees – of whatever age – are keen to use. If you finally spend money on new technology after the best of them have left, you’ll be short of the skills to make full use of the capabilities you’ve invested. And in the age of the fully-digital enterprise when IT is no longer simply a support function, you’ll be failing to get maximum benefit from an essential competitive differentiator.

How Do You Stay Ahead? (Spoiler: It’s not all about technology!)

Clearly, this adds weight to any efforts you have underway to advance your internal systems. It bolsters the case for investing in flexible, virtualized work environments that are mobile-friendly and device agnostic. As you free employees to work from anywhere and on any device, and on modern systems that are fast, adaptable, and efficient, you will set yourself apart in the marketplace for talent. Existing employees will view your company more positively – meaning they’ll be far less likely to look elsewhere and that you’ll get a reputation among talented, forward-looking people in your sector as the place work.

But investing in internal IT for talent retention isn’t just about the technology. People and process are crucial considerations, too.

Your best staff will know about and want to use the latest solutions, but they can’t be expected to make maximum use of them without training and support. So when you do update your IT, you need to be sure that employees are supported in the transition and that your organization is prepared to shift its operating model to fully exploit the systems you are putting in place. And you need to be ready to get help to do that if needed.

In addition, empower your tech staff to help guide the technology roadmap you create. It helps build the sense of ownership that will keep them attached to the organization, but it’s also smart management. These people have experience, knowledge of the business, and proven ambition. You’re always going to build a better system if you include them in your planning than you would if you present them with a plan that’s already a done deal.

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Mark Sterner brings over 14 years of experience in IT Service Management. He has worked in both the process development and ITIL implementation areas for large IT organizations. Mark is currently a Transformation Consultant at VMware, Inc.

From CIO to CEO: Shaping Your ITaaS Transformation Approach

Jason StevensonBy Jason A. Stevenson

In this CIO to CEO series we’ve discussed how to run, organize, and finance an ITaaS provider. In this blog, we will discuss how to approach the ITaaS transformation to gain the most value.

Barriers to Success

Transforming a traditional IT organization to be a private cloud provider and/or public cloud broker using ITaaS contradicts many basic human behaviors. To undergo a transformation we must convince ourselves to:

  • Put other people first; specifically customers paying for the service and users receiving the service.
  • Place ourselves in a service role from the very top of the IT organization to the very bottom and allow ourselves to be subservient to others.
  • Give up the notion of self-importance and recognize each and every person plays an equal role in the chain when delivering an end-to-end service and accept a fair amount of automation of what we do on a regular basis.
  • Redistribute control from individuals to processes that leverage group intelligence and center authority within service ownership and lifecycle.
  • Become truly accountable for our role in service delivery and support where all involved can clearly see what we have done or not done.
  • Approach problems and continual service improvement in a blameless environment that shines light on issues rather than covering or avoiding them.

In other words, we must be: humble, honest, relaxed, and trusting. Not the kind of words you often hear in a technology blog but nonetheless accurate. In essence, we must change. That is different from he must change, she must change, or they must change; and that is very different from it must change. In the IT industry, we tend to abstract change by focusing on “it” which is often hardware and software and then deflect change to “they” which is often users or another department.

Are You Ready for Change?

The first two questions an ITaaS CEO (CIO) needs to ask are:

  1. “Do I really want change?”
  2. “Are we really willing to change?”

Initially the answer seems obvious “Of course I do, we have to.” In that subtle nuance of “I” and then “we” lies our challenge. As we wade in we realize the level of resistance that’s out there and the effort it will take to overcome it. We begin to realize the long term commitment needed. For the faint of heart, change dies then and there. But for those who take on challenge the journey is just beginning.

Many IT organizations are focused on service/technology design and operation and therefore do not have the necessary level of in-house expertise to guide their own organization through a complete people, process, and technology transformation. To ensure the greatest return on their investment, many organizations look to a partner that is:

  • Specifically experienced in transformation to instill confidence within their organization.
  • External to their organization and somewhat removed from internal politics to increase effectiveness.

Assuming a partnership is right for your organization for these or other reasons the question becomes “How do I pick the right partner?

Personal Trainer vs. Plastic Surgeon

You’ve heard the saying “Be careful what you ask for you might just get it.” This is very true of an ITaaS CEO looking for a partner to relieve some of the effort and commitment associated with change. Becoming a cloud provider/broker is hard work. The analogy of personal trainer was specifically chosen because of its implication that the hard work cannot be delegated. Though counterintuitive, the more an ITaaS CEO or his/her team attempts to push the “hard work” to a partner the more the partner becomes a plastic surgeon, “delivering” a pretty package with no guarantee that your organization won’t slip into old habits and lose all value gained.

A personal trainer doesn’t exercise or eat for their client, but coaches them along every step of the way. A personal trainer does not usually deliver exercise equipment, assemble the equipment, or even necessarily write a manual on how to use the equipment. What personal trainer does is show up at regular intervals to work side by side with an individual, bringing the knowledge they have honed by going through this themselves and assisting others.

For an IT organization that is looking to become a cloud provider/broker, reduce cost, or just be more consistent or agile, a partner can help more by providing consultation than deliverables. This isn’t to say that a partner shouldn’t develop comprehensive plans or assets, but your organization will get more value out of developing plans and assets as a team, coached by your partner, to ensure a perfect fit. Though the partner may recommend technology and then implement it, this is just one piece of the puzzle. Establishing a trusted relationship between the partner and the IT organization takes regular workouts/interaction.

My Approach to “Personal Training”

We all wish we didn’t have day jobs or family responsibilities when we want to spend time at the gym but reality mandates we spend short but regular amounts of time with our personal trainer. This is also true of the IT department and their partner. Though 100% of the organization must be involved in change at some point these workshops equate to approximately 10% of the time of 10% of the organization. When I am engaged in large-scale transformation with my customers, I find the optimal cadence for hands-on consultation is every two or three weeks, with three days (usually in the middle of the week) that feature half-day workshops consisting of a 2-hour morning session and a 2-hour afternoon session. These workshops are both timed and structured using principles that build goodwill with all stakeholders involved whether they are proponents or opponents to change.

A simplified version of my approach to overcoming resistance and obtaining commitment is to:

  1. Start by sharing a common vision, how the vision has value, and how we all contribute to producing that value.
  2. Raise awareness and understanding through orientation to allow as many people as possible to reach their own conclusion instead of trying to tell them what their conclusion should be.
  3. Establish trust with all involved by involving them in an assessment. Not an assessment of technology or the environment; rather an assessment that draws people out and engages them by asking what is working and shouldn’t be changed, what isn’t working and needs to be changed, and what challenges do we foresee in making a change.
  4. Openly and interactively draft a service model that includes features, benefits, and commitments and a management model that includes roles, responsibilities, policies, processes.
  5. Automate and enforce the service model and the management model through tool requirements.
  6. Review and revise after group workshops and through great finesse. Over time the group will progressively elaborate on these models and tools, going broader and deeper just as a personal trainer would by adding more exercises, more weight, and repetitions.

Avoiding Burnout

At the gym, we may overcome the initial challenge of understanding health and exercise only to discover how painful our aching muscles can be. This stresses the importance of rest and cross training. Much like a personal trainer, our IT partner must not push an organization to gorge on change or focus on one particular component of change for too long. This can sometimes seem sporadic to our team so the approach must be clearly communicated as part of the vision.

You may have noticed the use of the word “team” and wondered who is it? We can consider team in this context as the service’s stakeholders. That is everyone involved in delivery of service and yes that does include customer and user representatives.

An ITaaS CEO that involves his or herself… and not only chooses change and discipline, but also a partner focused on promoting team change and self-discipline over short-cut deliverables, will find their organization in a much better position to transform to a cloud provider/broker using ITaaS.

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Jason Stevenson is a Transformation Consultant with VMware.

Don’t Let Stakeholder Management & Communications Be Your Transformation’s Goop Mélange

John Worthington By John Worthington

What is “Goop Mélange”?

In an episode of TV’s “The Odd Couple” Oscar took on making his own dinner.  He mixed in potato chips, sardines, pickles, and whipped cream.  It was then garnished with ketchup.  When Felix asked what he called this mélange, Oscar answered, “Goop.”

So what does this have to do with stakeholder management?

The importance of stakeholder management is referenced in almost all best practice guidance including ITIL, COBIT, PMBOK, TOGAF and many more. In addition, the number of channels available for engaging stakeholders is growing to include social media, smartphones and other enabling technologies.

Unchecked, your stakeholder management plan can quickly become a very confusing mix of uncoordinated communication. Mixing up a little bit of everything can wind up being the goop mélange of your transformation program.

One way to assure a desirable mix of communication channels is to establish a Service Management Office (SMO), which can begin to develop marketing and communication expertise within the IT organization based on a well defined stakeholder management strategy.

The stakeholder management plan can take a look at the organizational landscape based on the current and future needs of a transformation path, identify key stakeholders and provide the analysis and guidance needed for others (such as project managers, architects, etc.) to effectively do so as well within the transformation context.

From a service management perspective, the stakeholder management plan and the SMO can set in motion the improvements needed to establish cross-functional communication. An example might be Service Owners driving dialog about end-to-end IT services across technical domains.

The stakeholder management plan, supported by a well-sponsored SMO, can also ensure that top-to-bottom communication channels are matured. This is enables communication between Process Ownership, Process Management and Process Practitioners as another example.

stakeholder managment

Sticking to these basics of stakeholder management and communications as you begin your transformation can make sure your stay focused on building a solid foundation for more sophisticated communication channels when the organization is ready, and avoid making a goop mélange out of your transformation communications.

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John Worthington is a VMware transformation consultant and is based in New Jersey. Follow @jMarcusWorthy and@VMwareCloudOps on Twitter.

Organizational Change: Perfecting the Process

By Richard Hawkins and Greg Link

Organizational change. Re-org. Shaking things up.

These words strike fear into the hearts of those that hear them. They should also strike fear in those that speak them. But sometimes organizational change is needed for some very good reasons. One that comes to mind is structuring IT to deliver end-to-end services and not just applications.

To reduce the pain often associated with Organizational Change, it’s important to have a clear plan in place that addresses each stage of process.  In this blog we’ll take a look at the stages Organizational Change from beginning to end as a primer on what things need to be considered and when.

Everything has a process and Organizational Change is no exception. The diagram below is a high-level overview of each of the 5 stages of Organizational Change.

Organizational Change Process

Step 1:  Gather and Validate Data

In this phase we look at every level of the organization from the top down along with the skills of each role including that of leadership. Fact is, in many organizations poor performance is more a reflection on leadership than the departmental staff.

Step 2: Perform Organizational Assessment

To assess your organization’s readiness for change, there are a number of questions you need to ask yourself. When did the last re-org take place? What changes were made? How was it received? Is a short survey in order? How formal is your organization? Are there roadblocks that can be removed to allow staff to do their job more effectively? How strict are your policies? Obtaining a cultural baseline is not easy, but well worth the effort.

Step 3: Develop Transition Plan

As you start the planning effort, it’s important to justify the change.  Having a good case for why the organization is undertaking this effort will go a long way toward acceptance.  It’s also important to identify ahead of time what cultural barriers you could face blocking a successful change.

Throughout this stage, you should remember that this effort will affect everyone, so consistent communication is key, and involving many layers of the organization, from directors and managers down to “rank and file” in the planning process will go a long way toward ensuring everyone is on the same page.

Step 4: Implement the Plan

This is another busy stage and, of course, the most important. Proper execution of a well developed plan is the key to success in any endeavor.

Leadership roles should lead by example and be fully committed to the change, and that commitment to the goal must continue throughout every level of the organization.  The success of this effort relies on all parties playing their part.

Seek out areas that may encounter resistance and work tirelessly to resolve them with empathy and understanding. Ownership of a problem in this area may not be an individual mater. It may require senior leadership intervention.

This is another phase where communication, through every means possible, is extremely important. The organization should know how things are going and how issues are being resolved in a timely manner.

Step 5: Validate Plan Success

We’ve done a good job at planning and execution so we’re done right? The new structure is in place and no one has quit or expressed any serious dissatisfaction. But are we really done? A truly good manager says “no” and will look back and make sure the plan and implementation achieved the desired outcome.

Make an initial assessment on how well the organization is working after the changes have settled in. A well timed Town Hall will go a long way in gathering the information needed to validate the efficacy and results of the re-org. If as mass gathering is not an option, departmental meeting should be in order.

In our next blog, we’ll explore 10 of the key actions you need to take along each step of this process to ensure success.

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Richard Hawkins is a Transformation Strategist based in Seattle, WA.

Greg Link is a Transformation Senior Consultant based in Las Vegas, NV.

Establish Your IT Business Management Office (ITBMO) To Run IT Like a Business

Khalid HakimBy Khalid Hakim

We hear a lot about (and maybe have interacted with) Project Management Offices (PMOs), and possibly about Service Management Offices (SMOs), but IT Business Management Office (ITBMO) sounds like a new buzz word in today’s modern IT business taxonomy. PMOs typically focus on the management and governance of IT projects, while SMOs are responsible for the governance and management of IT services and the processes to ensure effective service delivery. ITBMOs, however, go beyond this to the next IT business maturity level to address business and finance partnership with IT to help IT organizations transform into services-based, business-oriented, and value-focused organizations.

ITBMOHave you ever asked yourself of how you can make your CFO happy? How you can support your corporate financial goals and aspects of a balanced scorecard? How you respond to “IT is always expensive” perception? Have you thought of challenges related to quantifying value your consumers get of IT services? Are you challenged to view IT costs by services you deliver? Or even budgeting and forecasting by IT services? Can you tell on the spot what your unit cost of a service is? What about demand driven IT? Do you feel that you are always over capacity with low utilization of services? What about leveraging marketing power to promote your IT services? How you can commoditize and brand your IT services? And many other questions and thoughts that keep CIOs awake at night.

(I can hear you thinking)

We have been hearing about “transformation” and “running IT like a business” quite frequently nowadays. As a matter of fact, these are becoming overused terms without real meaning of what they actually imply. Imagine that you are the CEO of a new wood furniture manufacturing business. Obviously, the main functions that you could initially think about are Product Management (who turns logs into useful products), Sales and Marketing (who promotes and sells to consumers), and Finance (who manages the financial aspect of the organization). The question is: why can’t we apply the same discipline to IT organizations? Similar to Product Management, IT organizations deliver services, and therefore we have Service Management and Service Owners/Managers. We are only missing two things here to run IT like a Business: a strong service-based financial operating model and the Services Sales/Marketing sense to help promote and consume IT services in the best valuable manner to consumers.

This is what the ITBMO brings to the table: a stronger partnership between IT, Business, and Finance to accelerate transforming your organization into a business-oriented, service-based, and value-focused one. Initially, you can think of the ITBMO as a virtual group or committee that has champions from various IT/Business functions. This virtual team paints the IT business vision and defines its mission on how to run IT like a business to deliver more value to business in the most economical way.

IT Business Management Office (ITBMO)

Figure : IT Business Management Office (ITBMO)

As shown in figure 1, the ITBMO supports 6 functions/towers to ensure stronger partnership throughout the IT service and project management lifecycle. These are:

  • Service Management Office (SMO): the entity (or any similar) within an organization responsible for the delivery and management of IT services. This includes the pure ITSM process management and ownership and delivery along with the ongoing management of IT services.
  • Project Management Office (PMO): the entity responsible for project management and governance
  • IT Finance: the function that takes care of the financial aspect of IT, which could be part of IT or Finance. This typically includes IT budgeting, accounting, pricing and cost optimization.
  • Services Sales & Marketing: a new (or maybe existing) function that will be improved and strengthened as part of the ITBMO establishment.
  • Business/IT Alignment: any existing functionality (such as Customer Relationship Managers or Account Managers) that ensures ongoing alignment between IT and Business.
  • Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC): the function (or multiple functions) responsible for organizational change, developing IT policy and governance strategy, IT risk evaluation and mitigation and compliance.

A champion from each function (could be multiple champions based on the organization scale and size) contributes to the core operations of the ITBMO to achieve the value-focused vision. The ITBMO runs in consultative and supporting mode, but depending on the IT organization’s authority, decision making process and power, and delegation factors, the ITBMO could be an authoritative entity within the organization.

Standing Up an ITBMO

Figure 2: Standing Up an ITBMO

Figure 2 shows the six steps required to standup a successful ITBMO within your organization:

  1. Develop Vision/Mission: thinking of why you need an ITBMO in the first place is your first step. What is the challenge you are trying to overcome or opportunity you want to introduce? Thinking collectively in a short/long term vision and drafting a mission statement of what this ITBMO actually does are your foundational steps towards a value-focused organization.
  2. Build and Position the Organizational Structure: figure out what roles are needed and who needs to be onboard and whether this is a virtual team of representatives or dedicated and how it fits the organizational structure and reporting lines
  3. Develop Process Interactions: fully understand your existing processes interactions within the functions that will be supported by the ITBMO, and figure out where you want the ITBMO to help, support, and interject to accelerate value realization
  4. Develop RACI Chart: translate your discovered process interactions and help areas expected into a roles and responsibilities chart (i.e. RACI). This will expose the areas of improvement and will help build a short and long term improvement roadmap across all supported functions to achieve the desired vision.
  5. Establish Value Measures and KPIs: quantifying IT value is one of the challenging tasks IT management confronts. This step defines a very high level value measurement framework or methodology along with the success factors and measures that a CIO or CFO can judge the success of ITBMO thru. VMware vRealize Business is the technology that will be used as a platform to define those value measures and KPIs and help making informed decisions.
  6. Build ITBMO Ongoing Operations: build your ITBMO ongoing operations guide by identifying which RACI responsibilities will be performed

So, you might now be thinking about the value an ITBMO can bring into your organization and how you could best leverage such a powerful business unity:

  • Establish business horizon within your IT and implement a model to help run IT like a business
  • Ensure tighter partnership between IT, business, and finance. This partnership is key to IT success like any other business.
  • Enable your organization explore more improvement opportunities and build a maturity improvement roadmap to run IT like a business
  • Help accelerate your transformation journey not just to a trusted service provider, but to a strategic business partner
  • Create new virtual business roles within your organization and help accelerate this transformation journey
  • Help your IT organization make better and strategic use of VMware vRealize Business to drive the cost optimization and value realization strategy and goals
  • Empower your IT to deliver on the desired quality, at the right cost by creating tighter alignment and accountability between IT, Business, and Finance
  • Elevate and strategize your IT conversations with service consumers, stakeholders, and executives to support IT and business transformation journeys

And if you’re heading to VMworld, don’t miss this session (OPT 5075) on Tuesday 9/1 at 5:30pm!

6 Steps to Establish Your IT Business Management Office (ITBMO) with VMware vRealize Business

VMworld 2015While many smart IT organizations have started their transformation journey to service-oriented and consumer-centric providers, there are still some key gaps that need to be addressed to ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of this transformation and therefore to yield the expected value. These gaps are related to the IT financial operating model and how modernized it is to cope with technology & cloud evolution along with the business speed. The IT Business Management Office (ITBMO) is revolutionizing the way IT leaders demonstrate business value to the enterprise. The ITBMO could be a virtual committee to ensure stronger partnership between IT, Business and Finance together to drive an organization towards faster value realization and maturation. Khalid Hakim, global IT operations, financial and business management architect, and Jason Nienaber, IT Business Management Director at VMware will shed light on this new business practice using VMware vRealize Business to move your IT organization to the next level in maturity and position it as a strategic partner to your business consumers and line of businesses.

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Khalid Hakim is an operations architect with the VMware Operations Transformation global practice. You can follow him on Twitter @KhalidHakim47.

From CIO to CEO: 5 Steps to Organize an IT as a Service Provider

Jason StevensonBy Jason Stevenson

In my last CIO to CEO blog, we discussed How to Run an IT as a Service (ITaaS) Provider by providing services to meet customer needs using a commodity as an example. In this blog, we will discuss how to organize governance and personnel within an ITaaS Provider.

IT as a Service ProviderTo provide business/mission-value and remain relevant, many IT organizations are positioning themselves as a Hybrid Cloud Broker; providing both public and private cloud services to their customers and users. To be successful, these organizations must adopt ITaaS; a model in which IT is a commodity, providing services on demand to meet business needs through a scalable and measurable pool of resources using integrated and automated processes. This is accomplished through a blend of:

  • Cloud computing standards
  • Service management best practices
  • Leading cloud and virtualization technologies

The following provides five steps to reorganizing IT to become and ITaaS Provider.

Step #1: Service Owners and Managers

Misconception #1:
Service owners and managers are lower-level resources that: a) do not have financial responsibility, b) are not fully accountable for their service, and c) report into functional/project directors.

Organize an IT as a Service ProviderAs part of service portfolio and catalog management, IT assigns owners for each service.

  • Service Owners (SO) are accountable for service strategy including fiscal responsibility and understanding customer demand for their services. Service Owners solid-line report to the CIO.
  • Service Managers (SM) may also need to be identified for each organizational sub-unit such as lines of business, cost centers, geographies, etc. If used, service managers are accountable for service operation and potentially service transition. Service Managers dotted-line report to service owners.
    • In larger organizations, service owners and managers may use a one or more Business Relationship Managers (BRM) as a conduit to customers paying for the service. BRMs solid-line report to the CIO but are embedded with their customers. The CIO may also have an IT Financial Manager (ITFM) to coordinate ITaaS provider budget allocations to service owners and consolidated service chargeback to customers.

Step #2: Service Life Cycle

Misconception #2:
Service strategy, service design, service transition, service operation, and continual service improvement are just names of service management books.

Organize an IT as a Service ProviderThough many organizations claim to be service oriented, their organizational structures remain functionally and/or project oriented. The following diagram illustrates an organizational pyramid providing service orientation through a service-life-cycle-based organization.

  • Directors are assigned for each service life cycle step including service design, service transition, service operation, and continual service improvement. The CIO also acts as the service strategy director and also performs demand management. Directors solid-line report to the CIO but dotted-line report to the service owners/managers. These directors’ budgets are an aggregate allocated by the service owner.

Step #3: Process Owners and Managers

Misconception #3
Process managers can be an afterthought and “peppered” throughout the organization.

Organize an IT as a Service ProviderTo be successful, an ITaaS Provider must have mature processes under the control of process managers and owners.

  • Process Managers maintain unit procedure documentation. Monitor process reporting. Reviews process records for compliance. Provide ongoing process and system training to unit. Contribute to continual process improvement. Ensure compliance with policies, processes, and procedures. Facilitate regular process meetings and communication channels. Coordinate interface with other service management processes. Take corrective action if needed.

For organizations with intensely “siloed” or “stovepiped” cultures, process owners many need to be introduced. This is not preferred but a common reality.

  • Process Owners champion policies, process, roles and responsibilities. Provides ongoing process and system orientation. Facilitates quarterly reviews. Facilitates annual audits. Enables continuous improvement.

The Service Portfolio Manager (SPM) also fulfills the role leading a service/project management office. The office may including control, technical writing, quality assurance, etc.

Step #4. Technical-Facing Service and Configuration Item Owners and Managers

Misconception #4:
Technical resources for service design and operation do not need to work together in abstracted technical-facing services.

Organize an IT as a Service ProviderThe business-facing services discussed above are supported by functions each with its own owner.

  • Infrastructure Function Owner (IFO)
  • Application Function Owner (AFO)
  • Data Function Owners (DFO)
  • Service Desk Function Owners often fulfilled by the Incident Manager (IM)
  • Operation Center Function Owners often fulfilled by the Event Manager (EM)

These functions may be further decomposed into technical-facing services. Common technical-facing services for ITaaS include network, compute, and storage and each must have an owner.

  • Network Service Owner (NSO)
  • Compute Service Owner (CSO)
  • Storage Service Owner (SSO)

To be a successful ITaaS Provider, technical services are not “siloed” or “stovepiped” and therefore do not require managers in addition to owners as they are shared services. However, the components supporting technical-facing services often have:

  • Configuration Item Owners fiscally responsible for the component
  • Configuration Item Managers operationally responsible for the component.

Life Cycle Gravitation

Configuration Item Managers are often referred to as DevOps in an ITaaS environment; especially for configuration items supporting the application function. Depending on an organization’s culture, DevOps may dotted-line or solid-line report to the Service Design Director or the Service Operation Director. As the organization matures, resources naturally gravitate from operations to earlier phases within the life cycle.

Step #5. Users and Assignment Groups

Misconception #5:
ITaaS is just jargon. IT departments are about IT personnel delivery IT.

Organize an IT as a Service ProviderIn a mature organization, classification of events, incidents, requests, etc. are aligned to the business-facing and technical-facing services within the catalog rather than legacy Category/Type/Item classifications. In this respect, the Technical-Facing Service Owners and Configuration Item Managers discussed above may also be referred to as Assignment Group Managers. The remaining technical employees within the ITaaS provider report to these Assignment Group Managers.

Every individual employee of an ITaaS Provider must move from technology to process, to service, to customer, to mission, and then ultimately to a value focus. Because these individual employees are the first, second, and third line of support for the users receiving the service it is critical for these IT employees’ tools and training to encourage user value focus.

Though impractical from a presentation standpoint, the entire ITaaS Provider must conceptualize their role as an inverted organization chart with the users at the top of the organization, then IT employees supporting the users, and then IT management supporting IT employees.

Organize an IT as a Service Provider

Move from CIO to CEO by leveraging a Strategist from VMware to address the people, process, and technology elements necessary to transform your organization to an ITaaS Provider.

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Jason Stevenson is a Transformation Consultant based in Michigan.

Transforming Your Business with End-User Computing

By Daryl Bishop

Daryl Bishop-cropIn my last blog, I talked about the need for a common definition around what constitutes transformation within the IT organisation. In this follow-up post, I’ll discuss the VMware approach to an end-user computing (EUC) transformation.

First a recap, for an initiative to be truly transformational it must satisfy the criteria of change across the elements of people, process, and technology. Additionally, it should be aligned to business objectives and have clear benefits.

If we look at the typical EUC environment today, it’s transitioning from a rigid environment based on a desktop or laptop running a Windows operating system to one that is application and data-centric rather than device-bound. This has some profound transformational impacts for business and IT.

Today’s End-User Computing Environment
Let’s first take a closer look at the EUC environment found in most organisations today.

BISHOP-EUCAs shown in the diagram above, staff have historically used either a laptop or desktop as a primary device. This device, running Windows as the operating system, is locked down at the configuration layer with applications installed natively. This stack forms your traditional and very common standard operating environment (SOE) model. Coupled with the SOE, the EUC ecosystem included printers, isolated (not integrated) mobility devices, and finally an identity management authentication and authorisation component.

This model served us well, providing control, standardisation, and management of risk. However, the rise of the consumerization of technology, a modern IT-literate workforce, ubiquitous access to applications, the decreased usage of the Windows operating system, and the always-connected Internet means this model is, at best, inflexible and, at worst, irrevocably broken.

The Transformed End-User Computing Environment
So what does a transformed EUC environment look like? In the diagram below, the focus has been abstracted from the devices to the application and data access layer.

BISHOP-EUC2

Let’s look at each layer in a bit more detail to better understand the benefits of removing the focus on devices and elevating it to the application and data access layer:

  • Business layer
    Business is typically not just a single entity: It consists of your internal business and external B2B organisations that collectively form your business ecosystem. While your business will provide a core service, in the future it’s likely that smaller, more nimble organisations like start-ups will utilize your core business services and APIs to provide customers with innovative products. Your applications and data will not just be consumed internally, but also by external organisations as business-to-business transactions.
  • Application delivery platform
    The application delivery platform is a standardised access point where your consumers will access applications, data, and desktops. The key features of this abstracted application access layer are:

    • Device independence
    • Centralized management via policy
    • Auditable access and usage
    • Accessed over secure channels
    • Simplified ease of use

Where security and control was traditionally applied at the device and operating system level, it is now abstracted to the application and data access layer.

  • Lightweight device management
    In this context, lightweight management means the minimal IT controls necessary to manage devices, primarily for security reasons. While rigid, locked-down control has historically been the norm, in the transformed environment only lightweight controls are applied. For example, mobility devices use mobile application management (MAM) containerisation to ensure IT can remotely wipe or lock access only to the corporate container. Data, applications, virtual desktop access, and security controls are now applied at the application delivery platform layer via centralized policy controls.

Finally does this constitute a transformation? Let’s review the impact through the lens of people, process, and technology:

  • People
    A modernised EUC environment is a catalyst to elevate staff from traditional, task-based to knowledge creation activities using the productivity platform that best suits their work style. By unleashing staff from the rigid model of yesterday, staff exercise increased creativity, providing a real point of competitive differentiation through innovation.
  • Process
    The traditional EUC environment is awash with layers of process to manage a monolithic computing stack. From processes to deploy applications and patches to service desk support, they add complexity with many moving parts to manage. Shifting the focus to the application delivery platform with lightweight management of devices introduces policy-controlled automation and simplified management controls.
  • Technology
    Businesses today struggle with BYOD, security, and management. By abstracting the management to the access layer, BYOD becomes a moot point. IT is no longer concerned, apart from connectivity, about what device is being used. Security is applied where it should be, at the application and data layer. Finally, management is focused on controlling access to data and applications via policy, rather than managing a desktop and laptop stack.

I’ve really just scratched the surface of what constitutes an EUC transformation. The role of unified communications, changing work practices such as activity based working, the software-defined enterprise, and the changes to the IT organisational structure to support the transformed environment — can and should be significant components of a transformation program.

I’d be interested in your view from the trenches. What EUC initiatives do you have planned and how are they transforming your business?
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Daryl Bishop is a business solutions architect with VMware Accelerate Advisory Services and is based in Melbourne, Australia.

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