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Dell, VMware Virtual SAN, and Horizon Whitepaper

VMware Virtual SAN Logo

The Dell Wyse Solutions Engineering group has partnered with VMware’s Software-Defined Storage team to produce an extensive whitepaper detailing the performance of Virtual SAN running Horizon with View on specific Dell platforms. Virutal SAN configurations using two different hardware platforms are documented, with performance results from multiple differing configurations based on SSD and disk group displayed. The paper details results from the following platforms.

 Virtual SAN on the Dell PowerEdge R720

  • Standard: Each host with one SanDisk 400GB SLC SSD  for one diskgroup with 6 HDD.
  • Value: Each host with up to three 200 GB SSD SATA Value MLC (Intel S3700) with up three disk groups and 12 HDDs.
  • Login VSI was used to test performance for each of these configurations, with workload and operations performance results provided for each configuration.

Virtual SAN on the Dell PowerEdge C6220 II

  • High density platform that encompasses four nodes in a 2U enclosure.
  • VMware View Planner was used to validate performance of this platform up to 100 desktops per node, for 400 desktops in a 2U high density enclosure.

For more details on the testing and documented results, download the Dell VMware Virtual SAN for ESXi 5.5 with VMware Horizon View paper today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SSH keys when using Lockdown Mode – A 5.x Hardening Guide update

Hi,

I was informed today that there is a behavior in the 5.1 through 5.5 Update 1 Hardening Guides that is incorrectly documented.

The two affected guidelines are:

  • ESXi.enable-lockdown-mode
  • ESXi.remove-authorized-keys

Continue reading

vSphere Data Protection (VDP) – SSO server could not be found

I ran into the following error today while working with VDP: The SSO server could not be found. Please make sure the SSO configuration on the VDP appliance is correct. There is a KB article on this: http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2072033. After reading through the article and checking those items, the issue was still not resolved.

Some background info: It is my lab environment, which has a couple of DNS sources. I have vCenter Server running on Windows. The Windows server name was vc01.vmware.local and part of an Active Directory domain named vmware.local. The lab environment “outside” of my vmware.local domain is named pml.local. VDP is using a pml.local DNS server as its primary DNS server and a vmware.local DNS server as its secondary DNS server. I know – kind of crazy and no wonder I was having this issue. I tried a variety of combinations with my vmware.local DNS and the hosts file on the VDP appliance, with no luck. I even renamed my vCenter Server to the host name found in the pml.local DNS and re-registered the VDP appliance to vCenter Server using the new host name. The re-registration went fine, but when I tried to connect using the vSphere Web Client – still, no luck (same error).

The fix:

I logged onto the VDP appliance and ran this: tail -f /usr/local/avamar/var/vdr/server_logs/vdr-server.log

I then tried connecting to the VDP appliance using the vSphere Web Client. I observed the VDP appliance attempting to connect to SSO using the URL https://vc01.vmware.local:7444/sso-adminserver/sdk/vsphere.local . I added an entry in the hosts file on the VDP appliance for vc01.vmware.local and I was able to connect. Even though I renamed my vCenter Server, this did not change the URL for connecting to SSO. I verified this in the Advanced Settings for vCenter Server.

Lessons learned and reinforced:

  • DNS must be rock solid in a VMware environment (this has always been the case) – especially with VDP in the mix. You should be able to resolve host names across the entire environment by short name, fully qualified domain name (FQDN), forward lookup, and reverse lookup.
  • Always use fully qualified domain names when configuring VDP.
  • Time must also be in sync. Not the problem in my case, but just making sure everyone is aware.
  • Renaming vCenter Server (the host name) does not change URLs for connecting to SSO, the VIM API, etc.
  • It is possible to populate the /etc/hosts file in the VDP appliance to work around many name resolution issues, but this is not a recommended practice (see the next bullet point).
  • Keep things simple. In my case, it can’t be helped, but having a single source for name resolution is best.

@jhuntervmware

 

Journey to the SDDC – vSphere with Operations Management

Are you looking at the Software-Defined Datacenter (SDDC) and taking a dive into the vCloud Suite? As you take your journey it sometimes becomes confusing and potentially overwhelming as you look at all the possibilities and figure out what comes next.

For example, it’s fairly easy to recognize the value in these solutions, but you also do understand that implementing change takes time and resources no matter how much you desire to get them done. Continue reading

IBM Virtual SAN Ready Nodes are here!

What is the VMware Virtual SAN team announcing today?

Virtual SAN Ready Nodes continue to gain momentum!  The Virtual SAN product team is excited to launch 5 new Virtual SAN Ready Nodes from IBM.  The IBM Ready Nodes are based on the IBM x3650 M4 and IBM x3550 M4 server series.

Screen Shot 2014-07-22 at 8.06.00 PM

This takes the total count of Virtual SAN Ready Nodes to 34 including the ones from Cisco (4 Ready Nodes)Dell (3 Ready Nodes)Fujitsu (5 Ready Nodes)HP (10 Ready Nodes), Hitachi (1 Ready Node) and SuperMicro (6 Ready Nodes)

Great!  How can I quote/order the new IBM Ready Nodes?

The IBM  Virtual SAN Ready Nodes are available through IBM Certified Business Partners. If you want to order the IBM System x Ready Nodes, please contact your IBM Sales Representative or Business Partner.

IBM Business Partners can go to IBM PartnerWorld TechLine and select the link to VMware Virtual SAN – then select and download the configuration file using the solution reference number for the IBM Virtual SAN Ready Node solution of interest.

You can also work with your IBM Sales Rep to quote and order the IBM Virtual SAN Ready Node using the same TechLine solution reference number 

Where can I find more details about Virtual SAN Ready Nodes?

Please refer to my previous two posts on this topic, Virtual SAN Ready Nodes – Ready, Set, Go! and New Virtual SAN Ready Nodes from Cisco and Hitachi for more details on Virtual SAN Ready Nodes.

In addition to providing insight into Ready Nodes and the criteria used for classification of Ready Nodes into various solution profiles aligned to customer workloads for Server and VDI, these posts also describe how to quote/order Ready Nodes from specific OEM vendors.

Are there more Virtual SAN Ready Nodes from other server vendors to choose from? 

As always, we continuously work with our OEM vendors to build out new Virtual SAN Ready Node offerings.  We will keep you updated as we finalize more.

Watch this space for more details!

 

Horizon View and Virtual SAN Reference Architecture

VSAN-VDIHorizon VSAN RA ResultsThe VMware Software-Defined Storage group and VMware End-User computing group has teamed up to  create an in-depth Reference Architecture detailing the performance and configuration of Horizon View on Virtual SAN.

The VMware Horizon with View virtual desktops and Virtual SAN storage reference architecture is based on real-world test scenarios, user workloads, and infrastructure system configurations. It uses Dell R720 PowerEdge rack mount servers with local storage to support a scalable and cost-effective View linked-clone desktop deployment on VMware vSphere 5.5. Extensive user experience and operations testing is documented in the RA.

User experience testing results are highlighted  through Login VSI desktop performance and VMware View Planner performance testing, with both benchmarks demonstrating the linear scalability of Virtual SAN while supporting 100 desktops per node (Virtual SAN supports up to 32 nodes in a Virtual SAN cluster, but 16 nodes is the recommended optimal size for a Horizon on VSAN cluster). The Horizon View  and Virtual SAN Reference Architecture highlights the world-class performance of VDI solutions on Virtual SAN at an extremely low cost.

So download the Horizon View and Virtual SAN Reference Architecture today to gain further insight into detailed and extensive results from real-world Horizon on Virtual SAN testing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Managing Virtual SAN with RVC: Part 1 – Introduction to the Ruby vSphere Console

Allow me to introduce you to a member of the VMware CLI family that you may have not yet met, the Ruby vSphere Console, also called RVC for short. The Ruby vSphere Console is a console user interface for VMware ESXi and Virtual Center. You may already know of the Ruby vSphere Console, as it has actually been an open source project for the past 2-3 years and is based on the popular RbVmomi Ruby interface to the vSphere API. RbVmomi was created with the goal to dramatically decrease the amount of coding required to perform simple tasks, as well as increase the efficiency of task execution, all while still allowing for the full power of the API when needed. The Ruby vSphere Console comes free with and is fully supported for both the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) and the Windows version of vCenter Server.  Most importantly, RVC is one of the primary tools for managing and troubleshooting a Virtual SAN environment.  

Continue reading

VMware Virtual SAN Design and Sizing Guide for VDI

VSAN-VDIIt’s time for everyone to get up to speed with the latest and greatest VMware Virtual SAN Design and Sizing guidance for Horizon View Virtual Desktop Infrastructures. In this new white paper, Wade Holmes and I leveraged the previously provided guidance from the VMware Virtual SAN Design and Sizing white paper, and applied it to the Horizon View Virtual Desktop Infrastructures use case. This new paper provides prescriptive guidance for sizing and designing of all key requirements and components of Horizon View Virtual Desktop Infrastructures for VMware Virtual SAN. Some of the specifics items are listed below:

  • System Sizing and Desktop Classification
  • Host Sizing Considerations
  • Host CPU Sizing
  • Host Memory Sizing
  • CPU Sizing Assessment
  • Resource Overhead
  • Object calculations for Horizon View Desktops
  • Disk Group Sizing
  • Magnetic Disk Sizing
  • Flash Capacity Sizing

We highly recommend reviewing the white paper as inadequate sizing can a negative impact on the overall performance of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure. The new design and sizing guide can be found and downloaded from the VMware Virtual SAN product page or directly from the link provided below:

VMware Virtual SAN Design and Sizing Guide for Horizon View Virtual Desktop Infrastructure

For future updates on Virtual SAN (VSAN), Virtual Volumes (VVols), and other Software-defined Storage technologies as well as vSphere + OpenStack be sure to follow me on Twitter: @PunchingClouds

Build a Business Case for Virtual SAN – Register for the 7/17 Webcast!

Is your business looking to take the next step to software-defined storage?

On July 17th at 10:00 a.m. PDT, we invite you to join us for this VMware Webcast Series on Building a Business Base for VMware Virtual SAN.

Dive into software-defined storage with VMware Virtual SAN, and learn the factors that enable this industry-leading solution to deliver lower TCO. This webcast will include coverage of capital and operational expenditures savings, showcase case studies and outline a framework for building a cost comparison.

To those who are looking to build a business case for hardware independent software-defined storage — complete with built in failure tolerance and more — register for the webcast today!

For more information on VMware Virtual SAN, visit here.

For future updates, follow us on Twitter at @VMwareVSAN.

Understanding Data Locality in VMware Virtual SAN

VMware Virtual SAN LogoSince the release of VMware Virtual SAN, I’ve been involved in numerous costumer and field conversations around the topic VMware Virtual SAN’s ability to take advantage of data locality.

I have addressed the question in several of the Virtual SAN presentations I have delivered, but I realized that this was an ongoing topic of discussion and one which we needed to provide more details in order to satisfy everyone that has been wondering about this topic.  I figured it was time to put together some form of OFFICIAL collateral providing in-depth  details around this topic.

So, like any storage system, VMware Virtual SAN makes use of data locality. Virtual SAN uses a combination of algorithms that take advantage of both temporal and spatial locality of reference to populate the flash-based read caches across a cluster and provide high performance from available flash resources.

For more details on this topic, download the new Understanding Data Locality in VMware Virtual SAN white paper from the link below:

Understanding Data Locality in VMware Virtual SAN

- Enjoy

For future updates on Virtual SAN (VSAN), Virtual Volumes (VVols), and other Software-defined Storage technologies as well as vSphere + OpenStack be sure to follow me on Twitter: @PunchingClouds