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vFabric: 3 Points from the VMworld Opening Keynotes

On Monday morning, I had the opportunity to sit back and enjoy the opening keynotes with Paul Maritz, Pat Gelsinger, and Steven Herrod at VMworld 2012.  Since my efforts focus on the vFabric product line, I was quite excited to see how our executive leadership team announced the company’s vision and hit on where vFabric fits in. For those that missed the keynote, it is available here. First, I’d like to say how amazing it was to hear Paul Maritz talk about how much virtualization has been adopted during his short tenure since 2008.

Now, there were three points made in the keynotes which explain how vFabric is a key part of the software-defined data center story, and I thought they were worth passing along to anyone that missed them. Before I mention these points, it makes sense to summarize the relationship between vFabric and the software-defined data center at a very high level.  To do so, I will quote Steve Herrod in this software-defined datacenter overview:

“So, in the end, it is the applications that matter. It’s the applications that help a business make new revenue or be more efficient in how they are doing so. And we shouldn’t forget on the infrastructure side that it is just a means to an end. It [infrastructure] is the way to run these applications. It should be the way to run them quickly, to run them efficiently, to be more available, more secure, all while satisfying the needs of the businesses. So, the software-defined data center, I think is the platform of the future that will allow you to run all of your applications and, ultimately, be a competitive differentiator for your business.”

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Now, here were the 3 most interesting connections that I saw with vFabric:

  1. Nanotrader: In Steve Herrod’s keynote presentation, there was a demonstration of Nanotrader, VMware’s reference application architecture built with vFabric capabilities. This reference architecture provides a model for a highly scalable, Java-centric stack with runtime, data, and management components for provisioning and performance management.
  2. vFabric Application Director: With the integration of vFabric Application Director and vCloud Director, the vision for the software-defined data center becomes a reality in short order. Now, the entire Nanotrader reference architecture is quickly available to use within a software-defined datacenter.  Basically, you can quickly have a scalable, automated vFabric grid without heavy lifting. In addition, the new VMware Cloud Application Management Marketplace BETA provides solutions to deploy a myriad of other technologies beyond vFabric.  Couchbase, Puppet Labs, and Riverbed, are just a few of the 50+ solutions available in the marketplace today. For example, Riverbed’s Stingray Traffic Manager provides a software based application delivery controller.
  3. Big Data Example – Spring Hadoop on vSphere’s Scalable Infrastructure: Given the power and importance of big data and big data analytics, we see some compelling possibilities when running the vFabric stack alongside Spring Hadoop and Serengeti in the software-defined data center.  Incredible power, speed, and scale at extremely low capital and operating expense with already familiar technologies.

Needless to say, it was an exciting set of opening keynotes.
Look for another update soon about day 2!

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