Home > Blogs > VMware vCloud Blog > Monthly Archives: June 2012

Monthly Archives: June 2012

Welcome, Google, to the Raw VM IaaS Market

By: Mathew Lodge

Cross-posted from the RethinkIT Blog

Google announced limited beta of Google Compute Engine, its IaaS service, at Google I/O yesterday, after weeks of rumor and speculation. The IaaS market has evolved into two segments: “raw VM” IaaS led by Amazon Web Services, and enterprise, where the cloud directly supports the application with higher performance, more flexibility and high availability. This segment is dominated by the VMware vCloud service provider ecosystem.

Google’s service apes AWS in that it explicitly offers no availability guarantees, and existing applications are not invited to the party: the service is designed for start-up developers writing new applications. Ideally, its customers will deploy many instances of a few base VMs, following the patterns of Zynga and Netflix.

So welcome, Google, to the IaaS market – it’s great to see some well-financed competition for AWS in the raw VM segment. I really hope Google is serious about its offering given the limited success of Google App Engine, and because I wonder about Google’s motivation. Why do developers matter when Google makes almost all its revenue from ads? I expect it’s because developers write apps that collect and generate data. Google’s raft of free services from Gmail to Maps to Android exist to feed data and eyeballs (that is, you and me) into its ad algorithms, and 3rd party apps offer another way to do that. Those new Google glasses and tablets are going to generate all kinds of monetizable big data.

The announcement, along with the Glasses and Nexus tablet, highlight the importance of “big data”, the New Black of batch processing. VMware announced its Serengeti initiative a few weeks ago, which makes it far easier to deploy Hadoop onto virtualized infrastructures (i.e., clouds) of all kinds. My colleague Dave McCrory also launched datagravity.org this week, which explores the idea that computing must move closer to the data, not the reverse. vCloud provider NYSE Technologies is the embodiment of this approach with its capital markets cloud, designed to bring those apps closer to their exchanges.

When it comes to application gravity –- the inability to leave behind the apps you already have — there are now more than 125 certified public vClouds in 26 countries. It is the world’s largest cloud ecosystem, and all of them offer the same vCloud API, and compatibility with the applications you already have. It also offers me the opportunity to end on a high note: the most recent vCloud customer success story, over at Another VMware Cloud, is the non-partisan, non-profit National Democratic Institute (NDI). For the growing number of you who have ditched your dictators and need to organize political parties and hold free and fair elections, NDI can help faster, cheaper and with less interference (far more resistant to cyber attacks) because it runs on a VMware vCloud. Check out the video interview and their work at www.ndi.org.

Another VMware Cloud: The National Democratic Institute (NDI) Runs Their Public Cloud on VMware

According to Chris Spence, Chief Technology Officer at the National Democratic Institute, "Our move to the cloud has not only allowed NDI to focus on our mission, which is safeguarding democracy around the world, but it has also saved us a lot of money and allowed us to provide tools to our partners, which better leverages their use of technology toward their individual goals in the countries we work." 

The National Democratic Institute (NDI) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization based in Washington, DC. The NDI works with groups in 70 countries around the world to strengthen and support democratic institutions, safeguard elections, and help citizens better participate in politics. With the advent of cloud technologies and the broad adoption of mobile devices around the world, the NDI has seen opportunities for technology to empower citizens, help them connect with each other, change the way they interact with government, and generally increase citizen participation in politics. 

The NDI decided to pilot a vCloud Director implementation with Bluelock's vCloud Datacenter Service in order to address the problem of application reusability. Rather than building the same software applications over and over for different partners in different countries, NDI's VMware cloud solution enabled them to template applications and put them in the cloud. 

“With VMware vCloud Director, we now have the option of deploying applications in clouds from Bluelock and other VMware vCloud Datacenter Services providers, cloning them, customizing them, and deploying them, without overtaxing our engineering team.”     

         

“VMware, Bluelock and NDI worked together to get the Virtual Datacenter up in just 48 hours and were able to complete the entire first phase of this project within just two months,” said Deepak Puri, Director of vCloud Business Development at VMware.

vCloud Director has proven to be the critical piece that enables NDI to serve applications to its constituents, as NDI can allocate computing resources as virtual datacenters, and provide access to those resources on an as-needed basis. Of their vCloud Director solution, Spence shares:

"It's really a no-brainer – it's cost savings, it's focus on mission, it's better allocation of resources, and at the end of the day, as your costs go down, your productivity and effectiveness is gonna go up." 

What’s next for NDI? The organization is now looking forward to moving their Disaster Recovery strategy to the cloud, seeing the potential for availability wins and a more coherent, cost-effective DR strategy. 

Visit Another VMware Cloud to learn more about other companies who have successfully deployed a public, private, or hybrid cloud model through VMware. Be sure to follow us on Twitter at @vCloud and @VMwareSP for more Another VMware Cloud stories!

VMware Customer Success in the Cloud

As more and more companies move to the cloud, we’ve been trying to highlight some of our top customers who have successfully moved to the cloud with VMware technology. In the past 6 months we’ve featured organizations across various verticals and industries who have deployed private, public and hybrid clouds based on VMware cloud solutions, and we’ve shown how they’ve achieved a wide range of business benefits such as reduced IT costs, improved security, increased flexibility and more by moving to the cloud.

Here are some of the key highlights:

Oxford University, the oldest university in the English-speaking world, was able to achieve its vision for a Database-as-a-Service hybrid cloud project with VMware – deploying a solution that enabled users to quickly fire up a database within a central service and increased the overall efficiency of the University’s users and departments. 

SEGA Europe, maker of popular games such as Sonic the Hedgehog and Super Monkey Ball, was able to reduce the time needed in game-testing implementations by 17% through a VMware hybrid cloud solution, resulting in more efficient, bug-free games.

Charles River Laboratories, a contract research organization in the Life Sciences industry with a presence of 60 locations across 16 countries, was able to create a hybrid cloud solution that enabled them to seamlessly manage the transition between their on-premise infrastructure and the cloud – giving end-users more flexibility as to where their applications can run from.

Finally, high-performance motorcycle designer and manufacturer, Ducati Motor Holding, was able to increase the flexibility and agility of the company by deploying a private cloud with VMware. Thanks to VMware technology, Ducati has been able to “deploy applications, solutions, services, and new architectures in an incredibly short time.”

Beyond the organizations we’ve highlighted in our “Another VMware Cloud” series, VMware’s Public Cloud Diaries also draw attention to the successes other organizations across various verticals have achieved by moving to the public cloud with VMware solutions. 

In Part 1 of our blog series around the Public Cloud Diaries, we took a look at the experiences of four companies in the Business Services Industry and how they were able to lower operational costs and focus on their core business by deploying to the cloud with VMware vCloud Service Providers.

In Part 2, we highlighted how four companies in the Communications and Healthcare Industries were able to improve uptime, meet strict security guidelines, and avoid the major cost of building and maintaining an IT infrastructure in-house by working with VMware vCloud Service Providers.

In Part 3 of our series on the Public Cloud Diaries, we discussed the experiences of 3 companies in the Insurance, Non-Profit and Retail Industries. By working with vCloud Service Providers, these companies were all able to enjoy lower costs, higher levels of security, and flexibility to scale based on customer demand.

Finally, in Part 4, we shared how five companies in the Software Industry were able to avoid the high cost of building their own servers or cloud solutions and achieve better security by moving to the cloud with a VMware vCloud Service Provider. 

More and more organizations of all sizes and industries are successfully moving to the cloud with VMware, so stay tuned for even more VMware customer success stories! Be sure to follow @vCloud and @VMwareSP on Twitter for future updates. 

Public, Private, or Hybrid – How vCloud Can Benefit Your Organization

By: David Davis

Certainly there is a lot of excitement around cloud computing and VMware vCloud but for those who are Ddcloud1
totally new to cloud computing, they first need to take a step back and find out really what it is. In this video, I’ll start out with some good jokes about “the cloud” before I get serious and explain the various forms of cloud computing (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS + more), how cloud computing requires a new approach in IT, and how the business is now expecting more of their IT department. At the end of the video, I’ll give an overview of different types of cloud – Public, Private, and Hybrid.

One of the things that makes vCloud Director unique is that you can use it in your private cloud and that it’s also used by large service providers in the public cloud. Then, you can connect your private cloud to a public cloud provider, securely, over an Internet VPN tunnel (for example) to create a hybrid cloud. This hybrid cloud would allow server & apps in the two clouds to work together. Then, using vCloud Connector, you could see the workloads in each of the clouds in a single place and then move (powered-off) virtual machines from one cloud to another.

To jumpstart your knowledge of cloud computing, watch the following video:

 

David Davis is a VMware Evangelist and vSphere Video Training Author for Train Signal. He has achieved CCIE, VCP,CISSP, and vExpert level status over his 15+ years in the IT industry. David has authored hundreds of articles on the Internet and nine different video training courses for TrainSignal.com including the popular vSphere 5 and vCloud Director video training courses. Learn more about David at his blog or on Twitter and check out a sample of his VMware vSphere video training course from TrainSignal.com.

Building Your Cloud With vCloud Director

By: Chris Colotti, Consulting Architect, VMware Global Center of Excellence

This is a repost from Chris' personal blog, ChrisColotti.us.

Vmware_vcloud_director_box_shot-e1328279959814

Below is a recording of the session I did in January 2012 at Gillette Stadium with Paul Lembo called “Building your cloud with vCloud Director”.  I finally got a copy of the session and wanted to share it for those that could not make it to that event.  It was well received – thanks to Chris Harney for getting me the session video.  It takes a slightly different approach than the one done at VMworld and Partner Exchange.

One thing that was really funny about this session is that the stadium apparently pipes the audio into the restrooms.  I found out later that many people thought I was in both the Men’s and Ladies rooms just talking to myself.  I guess you had to be there, but it was pretty funny to find that out after the fact.  As we know the Patriots did beat the Ravens, but we won’t talk about the SuperBowl outcome.

Video:

 

Slides:

Chris is a Consulting Architect with the VMware vCloud Delivery Services team with over 10 years of experience working with IT hardware and software solutions. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Systems from the Daniel Webster College. Prior to VMware he served a Fortune 1000 company in southern NH as a Systems Architect/Administrator, architecting VMware solutions to support new application deployments. At VMware, in the roles of a Consultant and now Consulting Architect, Chris has guided partners as well as customers in establishing a VMware practice and consulted on multiple customer projects ranging from datacenter migrations to long-term residency architecture support. Currently, Chris is working on the newest VMware vCloud solutions and architectures for enterprise-wide private cloud deployments.

Vote Now for vCloud Sessions! VMworld 2012 Voting Ends June 8

By: David Davis

VMworld 2012 is just around the corner. It will be held in San Francisco, CA August 27-30 and in Barcelona, Spain October 9-11. Who will the speakers be and what topics will be covered? That is all up to you.

Vote

Fortunately, VMworld’s sessions and speakers are based on public voting. That public voting is going on NOW and will end tomorrow, Friday, June 8. With roughly 1600 sessions submitted this year but with room for only 300-400 sessions, only 25% of the sessions will get to be presented. Thus, your VOTE is very important.

There are SO MANY fantastic sessions and speakers to vote for so I don’t like to recommend some over others, however, as VMware vCloud solutions are consistently innovating and improving, I want to make sure those presenting on vCloud topics have a strong chance of getting selected to speak. Here’s a list of sessions covering VMware vCloud that I recommend you vote for (TODAY!):

  • 1154 vCloud Director Infrastructure Resiliency: DR of the Cloud by Chris Colotti and Duncan Epping
  • 1162 The Biggest Difference Between Public IaaS Clouds Like Amazon, Azure, Openstack/CloudStack and the VMware vCloud by Willem van Engeland and Ton Hermes
  • 1166 Monitoring a vCloud Infrastructure by David Hill and Andy Troup
  • 1167 Architecting for vCloud Allocation Models by Chris Colotti and Frank Denneman
  • 1168 Architecting a Cloud Infrastructure by David Hill, Aidan Dalgleish, and Chris Colotti
  • 1179 Operationally Handling Upgrades to the vCloud Eco-System by Chris Colotti, Harry Smith, and Adian Dalgleish
  • 1195 Using VXLAN for vCloud Director DR and Failover Without Stretched Layer 2 Networking by Kamau Wanguhu and Aidan Dalgleish
  • 1196 vCloud Director Networking Deep Dive by Kamau Wanguhu
  • 1202 Cloud Infrastructure Architecture and Operations Q&A by Duncan Epping, Chris Colotti, Aidan Dalgleish, and Kamau Wanguhu
  • 1227 Metering and Billing in Cloud with vCenter Chargeback Manager by Ben Lin and Raman Veeramraju
  • 1263 vCloud Director Networking: Looking Behind the Curtains by Chris Colotti and Kendrick Coleman
  • 1266 Designing vCloud Director on VCE Vblock Platforms by Kendrick Coleman and Jeramiah Dooley
  • 1307 vCAT Part 1: vCloud Architecture Toolkit 3.0 Overview by Joe Sarabia and John Arrasjid
  • 1308 vCAT Part 2: Architecting a VMware vCloud by Wade Holmes and Ben Lin
  • 1309 vCAT Part 3: Operating a VMware vCloud by Kevin Lees and Rohan Kalra
  • 1310 vCAT Part 4: Consuming a VMware vCloud by Mahesh Rajani and Jason Karnes
  • 1385 Troubleshooting Storage Issues in a vCloud Director Environment by Faisal Akber
  • 1433 vCloud Director Customer Case Study: Enabling Agile Development at Ericsson Software Campus by Cathal Cleary and Shane Kelly
  • 1511 The Dynamic Duo; How vCenter Orchestrator and vCloud Director Were Used in Tandem to Enable a Real World Enterprise Private Cloud by Peter Janke
  • 1520 vCloud Director and vSphere for Business Critical Applications by David Gallant
  • 1543 Design and Implement vCloud Director: Use a People, Process, and Technology Approach to be Successful by Michael Mosley and Peg Eaton
  • 1595 Full Stack Infrastructure Migration Using Opscode Chef and vCloud Director by George Moberly
  • 1628 Turn Your vCloud Into a vTornado: Architectural and Performance Considerations by Mark Achtemichuk and Tom Ralph
  • 1630 Orchestrating vCloud by Tim Lawrence
  • 1658 Automating the Backup of Your vCloud Virtual Environment with the Tools You Already Have in Your Hands by Teck Meng Lee and Gene HUH
  • 1672 Scaling vCloud Director with IP Address Management (IPAM) Automation by Joe Sarabia and Peter Rizk
  • 1745 VMware Cloud: Connecting the Dots by Massimo Re Ferre'
  • 1768 Bending the vCloud Network Reference Architecture to Your Will: Use-cases for Org and vApp Network Types, and Their Integration to Physical Networks by Philip Ditzel and Brian Carlson
  • 1776 vCloud Director: Training Labs for Virtual and Physical Solutions by Michael Letschin and Theron Conrey
  • 1863 Going into the vCloud, and What it Means to IT Support Skills by Paul McSharry
  • 1880 How Can the Infrastructure Team Enable Agile Software Deveopment by Andy Steven
  • 1927 vCloud Networking: an Extensible and Open Platform by Harish Muppalla and Adina Simu
  • 1966 Designing a Comprehensive Performance Management and Monitoring Strategy for vCloud Powered Service Providers by William Bell II and Nic O'Donovan
  • 1968 Beyond Cloud Readiness:Is Your Organization Ready for vCloud Director? By JP Morgenthal and Damian Karlson
  • 1984 A Self-service Model for Supporting Engineering, Scientific and Other Technical Applications in a vCloud Environment by Josh Simons and Ryan Kelly
  • 1987 Continuous Deployment of Apps & Infrastructure With Chef and vCloud Director by Adam Jacob
  • 2002 DevCloud: Empowering Your Developers by Scott Strohmeyer and Jeremy Kuhnash
  • 2049 Build Your IT-as-a-Service (ITaaS) Architecture Leveraging VMware vCenter Orchestrator, -vCloud Director and EMC Atmos by Yossi Mesika
  • 2062 Certifying the Cloud: VMware’s New vCloud Certification Track by Jon Hall
  • 2070 Build Your Own Simple, Integrated, and Smart Cloud Services – Leveraging vCloud Director, vSphere 5, and Isilon by Tom Twyman and Aaron Miller
  • 2084 PCI & PHI Compliant Environments Using vCloud Director by Merritte Stidston
  • 2109 How to Setup Disaster Recovery for vSphere & vCloud Workloads by Gil Levonai and Pat O’Day
  • 2129 vCloud-inception (vCloud in a vCloud vApp) by Charles Llewellyn
  • 2134 Using vCloud IAAS for Simplifying Infrastructure Delivery – Higher Education Customer Panel with numerous customer experts
  • 2150 Lab Management with vCloud Director – Software Development Customer Panel with numerous experts
  • 2155 vCloud DR for Oxford University Computing Services – Real World Example with Aidan Dalgleish and Gary Blake
  • 2156 Protect Your Cloud – Backup and the vCloud Director with Nico Koenig
  • 2164 Automation of vCloud Director Disaster Recovery with Aidan Dalgleish and Alan Renouf
  • 2199 VMware vCloud Director Networking in Real-world: A Practical Approach by Raman Veeramraju
  • 2257 Disaster Recovery as a Service: Cost-effective and Secure DR in the vCloud with Gil Levonai and Christian van Barneveld
  • 2276 Getting Ready for the vCloud – Operational Best Practices by Andy Troup and Rich Benoit
  • 2318 Platform as a Service with VMware vCloud Director: As Seen from the Trenches and Ivory Towers by Christopher Kusek and Damian Karlson
  • 2350 Evolving VMware vSEL: The Journey to OneCloud by Ford Donald
  • 2373 Best Practice for Deploying VXLAN with Cisco Nexus 1000V and VMware vCloud Director by Hang Yang
  • 2420 Automating Disaster Recovery for vCloud Director Environment by Karol Boguniewicz and Aleksander Bukowiński
  • 2453 vCloud Network Reference Architecture: Use-cases for Org and vApp Network Types, and their Integration to Physical Networks by Brian Carlson and Philip Ditzel
  • 2520 vCloud Director: Understanding the Virtual Network Components for Private and Public Cloud by George Kobar and Chris Greene
  • 2523 Consuming the Cloud – Deep Dive into vCloud Consumption Models and How to Integrate Them with Chargeback by Milos Brkic
  • 2562 Protecting vCloud Director by Daniel Miller and Eddie Pavkovic
  • 2566 Customer Success  by Story: MicroStrategy Delivers Business Critical Analytic Applications in the Cloud Using VMware vCloud Director by Dave Korsunsk and Alejandro Freixas
  • 2599 A Customer Success Story: Microstrategy Delivers Business Critical Analytic Applications in the Cloud Using VMware vCloud Director by Alejandro Freixas and Dave Korsunsky
  • 2611 Customer Story: MicroStrategy Delivers Business Critical Analytic Applications in the Cloud Using VMware vCloud Director by Alejandro Freixas and Dave Korsunsky
  • 2684 Designing a Highly Available, Highly Resilient, Multi-site vCloud Director Environment by Jack McLeod
  • 2703 Adding a Secure Service Backend to your vCloud Datacenter by Jordan Janeczko and Ulrich Hansmair
  • 2713 Secure Services Backend for vCloud Datacenter Using vShield App by Jordan Janeczko and Ulrich Hansmair
  • 2730 Building an Enterprise Private Cloud with vCloud Director: Lessons Learned
  • 2756 Revolutionizing Labs with vCloud Director by Jon Sanchez and Jason Puig
  • 2837 Creating a Balanced Infrastructure-as-a-Service Portfolio with vCloud Director by Pat O'Day and Ian Perez-Ponce
  • 2897 Protecting and Restoring Your vCloud Director Assets by George Winter
  • 2925 Building Robust vCenter Management and vCloud Director Environments: Deployment Best Practices by Rajesh Dave and Justin King
  • 2955 Troubleshooting vCloud Director Networking by Chris Greene and George Kobar

Whew! I know that is a LOT of vCloud-related sessions but that is just a very small percentage of the total number of sessions that were submitted so you can see why these great sessions need your vote!

While you are voting, please don’t forget my sessions with vCloud Director guy, Kendrick Coleman. Here they are:

  • 2911 Pass the First Time – VCP Certification Bootcamp
  • 2921 Cloud for Dummies – No BS Guarantee
  • 2927 Building a vCloud Director Home Lab – Stories From The Trenches
  • 2931 Top 25 Free Tools for vSphere Management – NEW in 2012

With so many great topics up voting, I can already tell this is going to be a GREAT VMWORLD in 2012!

It’s free and easy to vote so VOTE TODAY! (before it’s too late) CLICK HERE

David Davis is a VMware Evangelist and vSphere Video Training Author for Train Signal. He has achieved CCIE, VCP,CISSP, and vExpert level status over his 15+ years in the IT industry. David has authored hundreds of articles on the Internet and nine different video training courses for TrainSignal.com including the popular vSphere 5 and vCloud Director video training courses. Learn more about David at his blog or on Twitter and check out a sample of his VMware vSphere video training course from TrainSignal.com.

How To Handle Some vCloud Director Challenges

By: Chris Colotti, Consulting Architect, VMware Global Center of Excellence

This is a repost from Chris' personal blog, ChrisColotti.us.

The other day I was sent a link to a 9-slide deck titled “Life before and after vCloud Director”, put together by someone I do not know that takes time to point out some specific challenges with vCloud Director, mostly with networking and vShield Edge.  From what I have learned this deck was previously circulated and has recently re-surfaced.  It tries to explain that datacenters after vCloud Director are “Extremely Fragile” due mainly to the fact we use vShield Edge.  As a vCloud person myself I felt a bit obligated to address some of these for some of you in a more structured approach.  Some of the noteable points that are presented as “facts” in the slides are as follows:

  • “The Entire Networking Functions of vCloud Director relies on a single VM, and the Entire Datacenter performance and capabilities are then as powerful as this device…”
This is not entirely true.  The vShield Edge Appliances are an optional component to deploy based on your chosen network configuration.  It should be noted the vShield Manager appliance, however, is a requirement component to complete the vCloud Director configuration.  As we know these are two different things within vCloud Director, and should not be confused.  If you chose not to use it when setting up networks, then all your networking is backed by standard vSphere switch port groups, and networking is unchanged.  Some other notes pointed out about the vShield Appliance.

  • “One vShield is needed for every network”
  • “It Can Fail”
  • “It has no redundancy capability”
  • “It is the firewall, router, DHCP, and Load Balancer to the vCD system”
  • “vCloud does not support other 3rd party alternatives”
  • It creates very complex network connectivity”

A vShield appliance is only needed if you choose to NAT route the Organization networks or the vApp networks.  These NAT routed networks are not technically required, but are used if the design considerations call for it.  Of course using them within vCloud Director is a preferred means to achieve easy multi-tenancy.  Yes, vShield Edge devices and vShield Manager could fail.  Let’s be honest…ANYTHING can fail, so that statement is pretty broad and without much merit.  However, it is a VM protected most likely by VMware HA, as are so many other production Virtual Machines today.  There are  also multiple blog posts about how VMware Fault Tolerance can be used to protect the vShield Manager as well as the deployed vShield Appliances themselves.

The appliance is the firewall, router, DHCP, and Load balancer for Selected Networks and Organizations, but not for the “vCD System”.  You can always use direct connected networks and external firewalls, as well as load balancers and VPN devices.  Again, vShield is NOT a requirement, it is simply a tool to assist in the design of a multi-tenant vCloud Director deployment.  We have also had folks deploy other Virtual Machines in the cloud itself to handle some of these functions, including virtual load balancers.

I have always said in public forums the networking is complex and is something that people need to start understanding. This is no different than when VMware administrators needed to start to understand and learn about VLANs, and trunking back in the early days.  As things evolve they inherently become more complex.  That's the nature of the beast and the new learning curve we all have to deal with.  Has storage become less complex over time?  What about networking in general with VXLAN, or other new technologies?  People in general are afraid of new complexity because it is hard, and most people fear change and learning something new.  Yes, it’s complex, life is complex….learn it and move onto the next thing to learn that is more complex.

Let’s be honest here.  Yes, there are some challenges with vCloud Director in some cases more than the networking alone, nobody will deny that I think.  The difference is many good architects have designed around them with what I call “Creative Critical Thinking”.  The points above are narrowly focussed on a few aspects and don’t tell the whole story in 9 slides.  I would submit that anyone can address many of the concerns, and many have including some large service providers.  it’s about architecting around the challenges.  Some of which may even be addressed in future releases of vCloud Director.  Talk to a couple of vCloud Director customers and community experts to understand how these things can be addressed.

Chris is a Consulting Architect with the VMware vCloud Delivery Services team with over 10 years of experience working with IT hardware and software solutions. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Systems from the Daniel Webster College. Prior to VMware he served a Fortune 1000 company in southern NH as a Systems Architect/Administrator, architecting VMware solutions to support new application deployments. At VMware, in the roles of a Consultant and now Consulting Architect, Chris has guided partners as well as customers in establishing a VMware practice and consulted on multiple customer projects ranging from datacenter migrations to long-term residency architecture support. Currently, Chris is working on the newest VMware vCloud solutions and architectures for enterprise-wide private cloud deployments.

The New Service Provider Learning Path on Partner Central

In case you missed yesterday’s vmLIVE presentation on the new Service Provider Learning Path available on Partner Central, here is a summary of what these new paths mean for VMware Service Providers. (You can also download a recording of the webinar)

As the VMware Service Provider Program (VSPP) grows and matures, VMware continually aims to add new benefits to help partners. Ensuring that Service Providers are receiving the education and tools they need to be successful is a natural part of this growth process.

Because VMware offers many courses through Partner University, the VSPP Learning Paths were created to help inform Service Providers as to which courses are relevant to them, and more specifically which courses are relevant to specific roles within the company. The training plans within the Learning Paths were designed to provide easy access to the educational materials that are most applicable to Sales Associates, Sales Engineers, Design Architects, and System Administrators.

Splearning1

Here’s the breakdown of what types of training are included in each of the different Learning Paths:

Splearning2

In sum, by following specific role-based training plans offered through the Service Provider Learning Paths, Service Providers will have the power to gain a better understanding of cloud technologies and attain the industry-recognized VMware accreditations and certifications available to them. 

Visit Partner Central today (login required) and try out a training plan! And be sure to follow @vCloud and @VMwareSP on Twitter for future updates. 

vCloud Director in the Real World with vExpert Jake Robinson

By: David Davis

VMware’s vCloud Director is a powerful cloud management and orchestration tool (which you can try for yourself for 60 days), but what real customers are using it and what are they using it for? In this video, vExpert and cloud administrator, Jake Robinson, from Bluelock (a vCloud Datacenter partner) covers some of the many use cases for vCloud Director – both in the enterprise and SMB.

Examples of case studies that Jake will walk you through are the EMC “Cloud 9”, the Consona Hybrid cloud, and how many companies are using the public cloud. At the end of the video, Jake walks us through his vCloud Director lab environment, showing us vApps he uses for vCloud Director virtual networking.

I believe that this video will really help you to visualize all that can be done with vCloud Director, how it can be used at companies of various sizes, and for what purposes.

This is great insight from a vCloud Director administrator at a vCloud Datacenter partner. 

 

For more vCloud Diretor resources, checkout these posts:

David Davis is a VMware Evangelist and vSphere Video Training Author for Train Signal. He has achieved CCIE, VCP,CISSP, and vExpert level status over his 15+ years in the IT industry. David has authored hundreds of articles on the Internet and nine different video training courses for TrainSignal.com including the popular vSphere 5 and vCloud Director video training courses. Learn more about David at his blog or on Twitter and check out a sample of his VMware vSphere video training course from TrainSignal.com.