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Category Archives: fusiondemos

Fusion is one amazing hypervisor


Type 2 hypervisors are cool.

If you’re looking at the ones from VMware (Fusion Pro, Fusion, Workstation & Player Pro) then you should know that the core technology in those is not only the same, but it’s the same as in vSphere – the solution that powers many of the world’s most in-demand and high performance data centers.

Why should you care about that? Because it means that the care and attention to detail that drives billions of seamless internet transactions every day is available to work for you should you need to run Windows on your Mac, Linux on your Windows, or just about any combination there of.

In this demo I thought I’d be crazy and see how far I could push them. While it certainly wasn’t without its scary moments, I hit no walls, encountered no unrecoverable errors, and barely even caused the iMac’s fan to spin. I’m using a combination of Fusion Pro and Player Pro.

The only reason I stopped at 25 was that it was taking too much time to build all those operating systems – I have a day job according to my boss.

Here’s the 25 nested OS’s you can see in the video running ALL AT THE SAME TIME on a late-2014 27” iMac with 32Gb RAM, 4GHz Intel i7.

  1. OS/X 10.11 El Capitan
  2. OS/X 10.10 Yosemite
  3. OS/X 10.9 Mavericks
  4. OS/X 10.8 Mountain Lion
  5. OS/X 10.7 Lion
  6. OS/X 10.6 Snow Leopard Server
  7. OS/X 10.5 Leopard Server
  8. Windows 10 Pro Technical Preview
  9. Windows 8.1 Enterprise N
  10. Windows 7 Enterprise N
  11. Windows Vista Business
  12. Windows XP SP2
  13. Windows 2000 SP2
  14. Windows 98
  15. Windows 95
  16. Windows NT 4 SP6
  17. Windows 3.1
  18. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS
  19. Debian 8.1 (Jessie)
  20. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation 7.1 (maipo)
  21. openSUSE 13.2 (harlequin)
  22. Fedora 22
  23. Zorin OS 9 (trusty)
  24. OS/2 Warp v4
  25. Android 4.4.2 (kitkat)

Clearly, if you try this yourself don’t phone support. They’ll be impressed but I doubt they help you. This was fun. I wonder what I can do next?

Thanks for watching.

Help wanted!

Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/andjohan/

We’re hard at work on making VMware Fusion even better. We recently released a Technology Preview and we’d love to get feedback on how we’re doing. The Technology Preview includes some exciting new capabilities of particular interest to power-users including:

  • Improved support for Haswell processors, as found in the new Apple MacBook Air.
  • Improved support for very large virtual machines (up to 64GB each)
  • Improved support for Windows 8, including “Metro” style applications.

The Technology Preview is still a work in progress, so please don’t use it on production systems or with virtual machines that have not been backed up. Your thoughts and experiences with Technology Preview and ideas for features you’d like to see in future versions of VMware Fusion can be posted in the community discussion forum.

 

Fusion Geek Speak: Cooking up a Poor Man’s RAID-Z with ZFS, USB Memory Sticks, Solaris, and VMware Fusion

Solaris
OK, this post may not be for the faint of heart…put on your propeller beanies, because here we go.

Jim Laurent over at Sun has a really cool post over on his blog about using a VMware Fusion hosted Solaris 10 virtual machine to play around with the open source ZFS file system and  a trio of USB sticks to make a poor-man’s Raid-Z array using USB sticks instead of actual hard drives.

So if you ever had a dream of using your Mac to make yourself a redundant array of inexpensive disks using USB sticks, but without having to deal with RAID-5’s write hole (ed note: what a great name), well, now you know what you’re doing this weekend.

You can see a more advanced version of what Jim did with his VMware Fusion Solaris VM and three USB sticks demo’d by some german colleagues of his in this video, where they use three separate USB hubs, each with four USB sticks in it, to demonstrate  the redundancy of zPools and ZFS in a RAID-Z configuration.

Are your propeller’s spinning yet?


Fusion Movie Night: VMware Importer Demo Video

The Fusion team does its best to make Fusion, and everything that touches it, as user-friendly, and Mac-like as possible.  That means, in part, user interfaces and software that are self-explanatory, and "just work."

Of course, try as we might, documentation is always good to have.  And written documentation is great for going back to and poring over.  But, then again, video is great for making things really obvious in a hurry.

So, in the pursuit of making even documentation "just work" we’re going to be making it a habit to do screen casts of key features and utilities, going forward.  With a rocking backing soundtrack, of course.

Our first effort concerns VMware Importer, VMware’s free utility for importing Parallels and Virtual PC virtual machines to run with VMware Fusion.   We have release notes, of course.  But we also made a video to show just how easy importing a Parallels or Virtual PC virtual machine is. 

Just another step towards making Fusion the easiest way to run Windows on Mac.

Enjoy!