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Peeking At The Future with Giant Monster Virtual Machines

Remember that cool project with VMware, HP Enterprise, and IBM where four super huge monster virtual machines (VMs) of 120 vCPUs each were all running at the same time on a single server with great performance? 

That was Project Capstone, and it was presented at VMworld San Francisco and VMworld Barcelona last fall as a spotlight session.  The follow-up whitepaper is now completed and published,  which means that there are lots of great technical details available with testing results and analysis. 

In addition to the four 120 vCPU VMs test, additional configurations were also run with eight 60 vCPU VMs and sixteen 30 vCPU VMs.  This shows that plenty of large VMs can be run on a single host with excellent performance when using a solution that supports tons of CPU capacity and cutting edge flash storage.

The whitepaper not only contains all of the test results from the original presentation, but also includes additional details around the performance of CPU Affinity vs PreferHT and under-provisioning.  There is also a best practices section that if focused on running monster VMs.

 

Fault Tolerance Performance in vSphere 6

VMware has published a technical white paper about vSphere 6 Fault Tolerance architecture and performance. The paper describes which types of applications work best in virtual machines with vSphere FT enabled.

VMware vSphere Fault Tolerance (FT) provides continuous availability to virtual machines that require a high amount of uptime. If the virtual machine fails, another virtual machine is ready to take over the job.  vSphere achieves FT by maintaining primary and secondary virtual machines using a new technology named Fast Checkpointing. This technology is similar to Storage vMotion, which copies the virtual machine state (storage, memory, and networking) to the secondary ESXi host. Fast Checkpointing keeps the primary and secondary virtual machines in sync.

vSphere FT works with (and requires) vSphere HA—when an administrator enables FT, vSphere HA selects the secondary VM (admins can vMotion the VM to another server if needed). vSphere HA also creates a new secondary if the primary fails—the original secondary becomes the new primary, and vSphere HA selects an available virtual machine to use as the new secondary.

vSphere 6 FT supports applications with up to 4 vCPUs and 64GB memory on the ESXi host. The performance study shows results for various workloads run on virtual machines with 1, 2, and 4 vCPUs.

The workloads—which tax the virtual machine’s CPU, disk, and network—include:

  • Kernel compile – loads the CPU at 100%
  • Netperf-  measures network throughput and latency
  • Iometer- characterizes the storage I/O of a Microsoft Windows virtual machine
  • Swingbench- drives an OLTP load on a virtual machine running Oracle 11g
  • DVD Store –  drives an OLTP load on a virtual machine running Microsoft SQL Server 2012
  • A brokerage workload – simulates an OLTP load of a brokerage firm
  • vCenterServer workload – simulates actions performed in vCenter Server

Testing shows that vSphere FT can successfully protect a number of workloads like CPU-bound workloads, I/O-bound workloads, servers, and complex database workloads; however, admins should not use vSphere FT to protect highly latency-sensitive applications like voice-over-IP (VOIP) or high-frequency trading (HFT).

For the results of these tests, read the paper. Also useful is the VMware Fault Tolerance FAQ.

Scaling Performance for VAIO in vSphere 6.0 U1

by Chien-Chia Chen

vSphere APIs for I/O Filtering (VAIO) is a framework that enables third-party software developers to implement data services, such as caching and replication, to vSphere. Figure 1 below shows the general architecture of VAIO. Once I/O filter libraries are installed to a virtual disk (VMDK), every I/O request generated from the guest operating system to the VMDK will first be intercepted by the VAIO framework at the file device layer. The VAIO framework then hands over the I/O request to the user space I/O filter libraries, where a series of third party data service operations can be performed against the I/O. After processing the I/O, user space I/O filter libraries return the I/O back to the VAIO framework, which continues the rest of the issuing path. Similarly, upon completion, the I/O will first be processed by the user space I/O filter libraries before continuing its original completion path.

There have been questions around the overhead of the VAIO framework due to its extra user-to-kernel communication. In this blog post, we evaluate the performance of vSphere APIs for I/O Filtering using a null I/O filter and demonstrate how VAIO scales with respect to the number of virtual machines and outstanding I/Os (OIOs). The null I/O filter accepts each I/O request and immediately returns it.

fig1-iofilt-arch

Figure 1. vSphere APIs for I/O Filtering Architecture

System Configuration

The configuration of our systems is as follows:

  • One ESXi host
    • Machine: Dell R720 server running vSphere 6.0 Update 1
    • CPU: 16-core, 2-socket (32 hyper-threads) Intel® Xeon® E5-2665 @ 2.4 GHz
    • Memory: 128GB memory
    • Physical Disk: One Intel® S3700 400GB SATA SSD on LSI MegaRAID SAS controller
    • VM: Up to 32 link-cloned I/O Analyzer 1.6.2 VMs (SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 SP2; 1 virtual CPU (VCPU) and 1GB memory each). Each virtual machine has 1 PVSCSI controller hosting two 1GB VMDKs—one has no I/O filter and another has a null filter, both think-provisioned.
  • Workload: Iometer 4K sequential read (4K-aligned) with various number of OIOs

Methodology

We conduct two sets of tests separately—one against VMDK without an I/O filter (referred to as “default”) and another against the null-filter VMDK (referred to as “iofilter”). In each set of tests, every virtual machine has one Iometer disk worker to generate 4K sequential read I/Os to the VMDK under test. We have a 2-minute warm-up time and measure I/Os per second (IOPS), normalized CPU cost, and read latency over the next 2-minute test duration. The latency is the median of the average read latencies reported by all Iometer workers.

Note that I/O sizes and access patterns do not affect the performance of VAIO since it does no additional data copying, maintains the original access patterns, and incurs no extra access to physical disks.

Results

VM Scaling

Figures 2 and 3 below show the IOPS, CPU cost per 1K IOPS, and latency with a different number of virtual machines at 128 OIOs. Except for the single virtual machine test, results show that VAIO achieves similar IOPS and has similar latency compared to the default VMDK. However, VAIO introduces 10%-20% higher CPU overhead per 1K IOPS. The single virtual machine IOPS with iofilter is 80% higher than the default VMDK. This is because, in the default case, the VCPU performs the majority of synchronous I/O work; whereas, in the iofilter case, VAIO contexts take over a big portion of the work and unblock the VCPU from generating more I/Os. With additional VCPUs and Iometer disk workers to mitigate the single core bottleneck, the default VMDK is also able to drive over 70K IOPS.

fig2a-iofilt
Figure 2. IOPS and CPU Cost vs. Number of VMs (128 Outstanding I/Os)

fig3-iofilt

Figure 3. Iometer Read Latency vs. Number of VMs (128 Outstanding I/Os)

 

OIO Scaling

Figures 4 and 5 below show the IOPS, CPU cost per 1K IOPS, and latency with a different number of OIOs at 16 virtual machines. A similar trend again holds that VAIO achieves the same IOPS and has the same latency compared to the default VMDK while it incurs 10%-20% higher CPU overhead per 1K IOPS.

fig4-iofilt

Figure 4. Percent of a Core per 1 Thousand IOPS vs. Outstanding I/Os (16 VMs)

fig5-iofilt

Figure 5. Iometer Read Latency vs. Outstanding I/Os (16 VMs)

Conclusion

Based on our evaluation, VAIO achieves comparable throughput and latency performance at a cost of 10%-20% more CPU cycles. From our experience, when using the VAIO framework, we recommend the following general best practices:

  • Reduce CPU over-commitment. The VAIO framework introduces at least one additional context per VMDK with an active filter. Over-committing CPU can result in intensive CPU contention, thus much worse virtualization efficiency.
  • Avoid blocking when developing I/O filter libraries. Keep in mind that an I/O will be blocked until the user space I/O filter finishes processing. Thus additional processing time will result in higher end-to-end latency.
  • Increase concurrency wisely when developing I/O filter libraries. The user space I/O filter can potentially serve I/Os from all VMDKs. Thus, when developing I/O filter libraries, it is important to be flexible in terms of concurrency to avoid a single core CPU bottleneck and meanwhile without introducing too many unnecessary active contexts that cause higher CPU contention.

 

VMware Virtual SAN Stretched Cluster Best Practices White Paper

VMware Virtual SAN 6.1 introduced the concept of a stretched cluster which allows the Virtual SAN customer to configure two geographically located sites, while synchronously replicating data between the two sites. A technical white paper about the Virtual SAN stretched cluster performance has now been published. This paper provides guidelines on how to get the best performance for applications deployed on a Virtual SAN stretched cluster environment.

The chart below, borrowed from the white paper, compares the performance of the Virtual SAN 6.1 stretched cluster deployment against the regular Virtual SAN cluster without any fault domains. A nine- node Virtual SAN stretched cluster is considered with two different configurations of inter-site latency: 1ms and 5ms. The DVD Store benchmark is executed on four virtual machines on each host of the nine-node Virtual SAN stretched cluster. The DVD Store performance metrics of cumulated orders per minute in the cluster, read/write IOPs, and average latency are compared with a similar workload on the regular Virtual SAN cluster. The orders per minute (OPM) is lower by 3% and 6% for the 1ms and 5ms inter-site latency stretched cluster compared to the regular Virtual SAN cluster.

vsan-stretched-fig1a
Figure 1a.  DVD Store orders per minute in the cluster and guest IOPS comparison

Guest read/write IOPS and latency were also monitored. The read/write mix ratio for the DVD Store workload is roughly at 1/3 read and 2/3 write. Write latency shows an obvious increase trend when the inter-site latency is higher, while the read latency is only marginally impacted. As a result, the average latency increases from 2.4ms to 2.7ms, and 5.1ms for 1ms and 5ms inter-site latency configuration.

vsan-stretched-fig1b
Figure 1b.  DVD Store latency comparison

These results demonstrate that the inter-site latency in a Virtual SAN stretched cluster deployment has a marginal performance impact on a commercial workload like DVD Store. More results are available in the white paper.

SQL Server VM Performance on VMware vSphere 6

Last October, I blogged about SQL Server performance with vSphere 5.5 using a four-socket Intel Xeon processor E7 based host.  Now that vSphere 6 is available, I’ve run an updated set of tests using this new release, on an even more powerful host, with Xeon E7 v2 processors.  A variety of virtual CPU (vCPU) and virtual machine (VM) quantities were tested to show that vSphere can handle hundreds of thousands of online transaction processing (OLTP) database operations per minute.

DVD Store 2.1, an open-source OLTP database stress tool, was the workload used to stress the VMs.  The first experiment in the paper was a generational performance comparison between the old and new setups; as you can see, there is a dramatic increase in throughput, even though the size of each VM has doubled from 8 vCPUs per VM to 16:

Generational performance improvement from old study to new study

There are also tests using CPU affinity to show the performance differences between physical cores and logical processors (Hyper-Threads), the benefit of “right-sizing” virtual machines, and measuring the impact of the advanced Latency Sensitivity setting. 

For more details and the test results, please download the whitepaper: Performance Characterization of Microsoft SQL Server on VMware vSphere 6.

Virtual SAN 6.0 Performance: Scalability and Best Practices

A technical white paper about Virtual SAN performance has been published. This paper provides guidelines on how to get the best performance for applications deployed on a Virtual SAN cluster.

We used Iometer to generate several workloads that simulate various I/O encountered in Virtual SAN production environments. These are shown in the following table.

Type of I/O workload Size (1KiB = 1024 bytes) Mixed Ratio Shows / Simulates
All Read 4KiB Maximum random read IOPS that a storage solution can deliver
Mixed Read/Write 4KiB 70% / 30% Typical commercial applications deployed in a VSAN cluster
Sequential Read 256KiB Video streaming from storage
Sequential Write 256KiB Copying bulk data to storage
Sequential Mixed R/W 256KiB 70% / 30% Simultaneous read/write copy from/to storage

In addition to these workloads, we studied Virtual SAN caching tier designs and the effect of Virtual SAN configuration parameters on the Virtual SAN test bed.

Virtual SAN 6.0 can be configured in two ways: Hybrid and All-Flash. Hybrid uses a combination of hard disks (HDDs) to provide storage and a flash tier (SSDs) to provide caching. The All-Flash solution uses all SSDs for storage and caching.

Tests show that the Hybrid Virtual SAN cluster performs extremely well when the working set is fully cached for random access workloads, and also for all sequential access workloads. The All-Flash Virtual SAN cluster, which performs well for random access workloads with large working sets, may be deployed in cases where the working set is too large to fit in a cache. All workloads scale linearly in both types of Virtual SAN clusters—as more hosts and more disk groups per host are added, Virtual SAN sees a corresponding increase in its ability to handle larger workloads. Virtual SAN offers an excellent way to scale up the cluster as performance requirements increase.

You can download Virtual SAN 6.0 Performance: Scalability and Best Practices from the VMware Performance & VMmark Community.

Docker Containers Performance in VMware vSphere

by Qasim Ali, Banit Agrawal, and Davide Bergamasco

“Containers without compromise.” This was one of the key messages at VMworld 2014 USA in San Francisco. It was presented in the opening keynote, and then the advantages of running Docker containers inside of virtual machines were discussed in detail in several breakout sessions. These include security/isolation guarantees and also the existing rich set of management functionalities. But some may say, “These benefits don’t come for free: what about the performance overhead of running containers in a VM?”

A recent report compared the performance of a Docker container to a KVM VM and showed very poor performance in some micro-benchmarks and real-world use cases: up to 60% degradation. These results were somewhat surprising to those of us accustomed to near-native performance of virtual machines, so we set out to do similar experiments with VMware vSphere. Below, we present our findings of running Docker containers in a vSphere VM and  in a native configuration. Briefly,

  • We find that for most of these micro-benchmarks and Redis tests, vSphere delivered near-native performance with generally less than 5% overhead.
  • Running an application in a Docker container in a vSphere VM has very similar overhead of running containers on a native OS (directly on a physical server).

Next, we present the configuration and benchmark details as well as the performance results.

Deployment Scenarios

We compare four different scenarios as illustrated below:

  • Native: Linux OS running directly on hardware (Ubuntu, CentOS)
  • vSphere VM: Upcoming release of vSphere with the same guest OS as native
  • Native-Docker: Docker version 1.2 running on a native OS
  • VM-Docker: Docker version 1.2 running in guest VM on a vSphere host

In each configuration all the power management features are disabled in the BIOS and Ubuntu OS.

Figure 1. Different test scenarios

Benchmarks/Workloads

For this study, we used the micro-benchmarks listed below and also simulated a real-world use case.

Micro-benchmarks:

  • LINPACK: This benchmark solves a dense system of linear equations. For large problem sizes it has a large working set and does mostly floating point operations.
  • STREAM: This benchmark measures memory bandwidth across various configurations.
  • FIO: This benchmark is used for I/O benchmarking for block devices and file systems.
  • Netperf: This benchmark is used to measure network performance.

Real-world workload:

  • Redis: In this experiment, many clients perform continuous requests to the Redis server (key-value datastore).

For all of the tests, we run multiple iterations and report the average of multiple runs.

Performance Results

LINPACK

LINPACK solves a dense system of linear equations (Ax=b), measures the amount of time it takes to factor and solve the system of N equations, converts that time into a performance rate, and tests the results for accuracy. We used an optimized version of the LINPACK benchmark binary based on the Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL).

  • Hardware: 4 socket Intel Xeon E5-4650 2.7GHz with 512GB RAM, 32 total cores, Hyper-Threading disabled
  • Software: Ubuntu 14.04.1 with Docker 1.2
  • VM configuration: 32 vCPU VM with 45K and 65K problem sizes

Figure 2. LINPACK performance for different test scenarios

We disabled HT for this run as recommended by the benchmark guidelines to get the best peak performance. For the 45K problem size, the benchmark consumed about 16GB memory. All memory was backed by transparent large pages. For VM results, large pages were used both in the guest (transparent large pages) and at the hypervisor level (default for vSphere hypervisor). There was 1-2% run-to-run variation for the 45K problem size. For 65K size, 33.8GB memory was consumed and there was less than 1% variation.

As shown in Figure 2, there is almost negligible virtualization overhead in the 45K problem size. For a bigger problem size, there is some inherent hardware virtualization overhead due to nested page table walk. This results in the 5% drop in performance observed in the VM case. There is no additional overhead of running the application in a Docker container in a VM compared to running the application directly in the VM.

STREAM

We used a NUMA-aware  STREAM benchmark, which is the classical STREAM benchmark extended to take advantage of NUMA systems. This benchmark measures the memory bandwidth across four different operations: Copy, Scale, Add, and Triad.

  • Hardware: 4 socket Intel Xeon E5-4650 2.7GHz with 512GB RAM, 32 total cores, HT enabled
  • Software: Ubuntu 14.04.1 with Docker 1.2
  • VM configuration: 64 vCPU VM (Hyper-Threading ON)

Figure 3. STREAM performance for different test scenarios

We used an array size of 2 billion, which used about 45GB of memory. We ran the benchmark with 64 threads both in the native and virtual cases. As shown in Figure 3, the VM added about 2-3% overhead across all four operations. The small 1-2% overhead of using a Docker container on a native platform is probably in the noise margin.

FIO

We used Flexible I/O (FIO) tool version 2.1.3 to compare the storage performance for the native and virtual configurations, with Docker containers running in both. We created a 10GB file in a 400GB local SSD drive and used direct I/O for all our tests so that there were no effects of buffer caching inside the OS. We used a 4k I/O size and tested three different I/O profiles: random 100% read, random 100% write, and a mixed case with random 70% read and 30% write. For the 100% random read and write tests, we selected 8 threads and an I/O depth of 16, whereas for the mixed test, we select an I/O depth of 32 and 8 threads. We use the taskset to set the CPU affinity on FIO threads in all configurations. All the details of the experimental setup are given below:

  • Hardware: 2 socket Intel Xeon E5-2660 2.2GHz with 392GB RAM, 16 total cores, Hyper-Threading enabled
  • Guest: 32-vCPU  14.04.1 Ubuntu 64-bit server with 256GB RAM, with a separate ext4 disk in the guest (on VMFS5 in vSphere run)
  • Benchmark:  FIO, Direct I/O, 10GB file
  • I/O Profile:  4k I/O, Random Read/Write: depth 16, jobs 8, Mixed: depth 32, jobs 8

Figure 4. FIO benchmark performance for different test scenarios

The figure above shows the normalized maximum IOPS achieved for different configurations and different I/O profiles. For random read in a VM, we see that there is about 2% reduction in maximum achievable IOPS when compared to the native case. However, for the random write and mixed tests, we observed almost the same performance (within the noise margin) compared to the native configuration.

Netperf

Netperf is used to measure throughput and latency of networking operations. All the details of the experimental setup are given below:

  • Hardware (Server): 4 socket Intel Xeon E5-4650 2.7GHz with 512GB RAM, 32 total cores, Hyper-Threading disabled
  • Hardware (Client): 2 socket Intel Xeon X5570 2.93GHz with 64GB RAM, 8 cores total, Hyper-Threading disabled
  • Networking hardware: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme II BCM57810
  • Software on server and Client: Ubuntu 14.04.1 with Docker 1.2
  • VM configuration: 2 vCPU VM with 4GB RAM

The server machine for Native is configured to have only 2 CPUs online for fair comparison with a 2-vCPU VM. The client machine is also configured to have 2 CPUs online to reduce variability. We tested four configurations: directly on the physical hardware (Native), in a Docker container (Native-Docker), in a virtual machine (VM), and in a Docker container inside a VM (VM-Docker). For the two Docker deployment scenarios, we also studied the effect of using host networking as opposed to the Docker bridge mode (default operating mode), resulting in two additional configurations (Native-Docker-HostNet and VM-Docker-HostNet) making total six configurations.

We used TCP_STREAM and TCP_RR tests to measure the throughput and round-trip network latency between the server machine and the client machine using a direct 10Gbps Ethernet link between two NICs. We used standard network tuning like TCP window scaling and setting socket buffer sizes for the throughput tests.

Figure 5. Netperf Recieve performance for different test scenarios

Figure 6. Netperf transmit performance for different test scenarios

Figures 5 and 6 show the unidirectional throughput over a single TCP connection with standard 1500 byte MTU for both transmit and receive TCP_STREAM cases (We used multiple Streams in VM-Docker* transmit case to reduce the variability in runs due to Docker bridge overhead and get predictable results). Throughput numbers for all configurations are identical and equal to the maximum possible 9.40Gbps on a 10GbE NIC.

Figure 7. Netperf TCP_RR performance for different test scenarios (Lower is better)

For the latency tests, we used the latency sensitivity feature introduced in vSphere5.5 and applied the best practices for tuning latency in a VM as mentioned in this white paper. As shown in Figure 7, latency in a VM with VMXNET3 device is only 15 microseconds more than in the native case because of the hypervisor networking stack. If users wish to reduce the latency even further for extremely latency- sensitive workloads, pass-through mode or SR-IOV can be configured to allow the guest VM to bypass the hypervisor network stack. This configuration can achieve similar round-trip latency to native, as shown in Figure 8. The Native-Docker and VM-Docker configuration adds about 9-10 microseconds of overhead due to the Docker bridge NAT function. A Docker container (running natively or in a VM) when configured to use host networking achieves similar latencies compared to the latencies observed when not running the workload in a container (native or a VM).

Figure 8. Netperf TCP_RR performance for different test scenarios (VMs in pass-through mode)

Redis

We also wanted to take a look at how Docker in a virtualized environment performs with real world applications. We chose Redis because: (1) it is a very popular application in the Docker space (based on the number of pulls of the Redis image from the official Docker registry); and (2) it is very demanding on several subsystems at once (CPU, memory, network), which makes it very effective as a whole system benchmark.

Our test-bed comprised two hosts connected by a 10GbE network. One of the hosts ran the Redis server in different configurations as mentioned in the netperf section. The other host ran the standard Redis benchmark program, redis-benchmark, in a VM.

The details about the hardware and software used in the experiments are the following:

  • Hardware: HP ProLiant DL380e Gen8 2 socket Intel Xeon E5-2470 2.3GHz with 96GB RAM, 16 total cores, Hyper-Threading enabled
  • Guest OS: CentOS 7
  • VM: 16 vCPU, 93GB RAM
  • Application: Redis 2.8.13
  • Benchmark: redis-benchmark, 1000 clients, pipeline: 1 request, operations: SET 1 Byte
  • Software configuration: Redis thread pinned to CPU 0 and network interrupts pinned to CPU 1

Since Redis is a single-threaded application, we decided to pin it to one of the CPUs and pin the network interrupts to an adjacent CPU in order to maximize cache locality and avoid cross-NUMA node memory access.  The workload we used consists of 1000 clients with a pipeline of 1 outstanding request setting a 1 byte value with a randomly generated key in a space of 100 billion keys.  This workload is highly stressful to the system resources because: (1) every operation results in a memory allocation; (2) the payload size is as small as it gets, resulting in very large number of small network packets; (3) as a consequence of (2), the frequency of operations is extremely high, resulting in complete saturation of the CPU running Redis and a high load on the CPU handling the network interrupts.

We ran five experiments for each of the above-mentioned configurations, and we measured the average throughput (operations per second) achieved during each run.  The results of these experiments are summarized in the following chart.

Figure 9. Redis performance for different test scenarios

The results are reported as a ratio with respect to native of the mean throughput over the 5 runs (error bars show the range of variability over those runs).

Redis running in a VM has slightly lower performance than on a native OS because of the network virtualization overhead introduced by the hypervisor. When Redis is run in a Docker container on native, the throughput is significantly lower than native because of the overhead introduced by the Docker bridge NAT function. In the VM-Docker case, the performance drop compared to the Native-Docker case is almost exactly the same small amount as in the VM-Native comparison, again because of the network virtualization overhead.  However, when Docker runs using host networking instead of its own internal bridge, near-native performance is observed for both the Docker on native hardware and Docker in VM cases, reaching 98% and 96% of the maximum throughput respectively.

Based on the above results, we can conclude that virtualization introduces only a 2% to 4% performance penalty.  This makes it possible to run applications like Redis in a Docker container inside a VM and retain all the virtualization advantages (security and performance isolation, management infrastructure, and more) while paying only a small price in terms of performance.

Summary

In this blog, we showed that in addition to the well-known security, isolation, and manageability advantages of virtualization, running an application in a Docker container in a vSphere VM adds very little performance overhead compared to running the application in a Docker container on a native OS. Furthermore, we found that a container in a VM delivers near native performance for Redis and most of the micro-benchmark tests we ran.

In this post, we focused on the performance of running a single instance of an application in a container, VM, or native OS. We are currently exploring scale-out applications and the performance implications of deploying them on various combinations of containers, VMs, and native operating systems.  The results will be covered in the next installment of this series. Stay tuned!

Monster Performance with SQL Server VMs on vSphere 5.5

VMware vSphere provides an ideal platform for customers to virtualize their business-critical applications, including databases, ERP systems, email servers, and even newly emerging technologies such as Hadoop.  I’ve been focusing on the first one (databases), specifically Microsoft SQL Server, one of the most widely deployed database platforms in the world.  Many organizations have dozens or even hundreds of instances deployed in their environments. Consolidating these deployments onto modern multi-socket, multi-core, multi-threaded server hardware is an increasingly attractive proposition for IT administrators.

Achieving optimal SQL Server performance has been a continual focus for VMware; with current vSphere 5.x releases, VMware supports much larger “monster” virtual machines that can scale up to 64 virtual CPUs and 1 TB of RAM, including exposing virtual NUMA architecture to the guest. In fact, the main goal of this blog and accompanying whitepaper is to refresh a 2009 study that demonstrated SQL performance on vSphere 4, given the marked technology advancements on both the software and hardware fronts.

These tests show that large SQL Server 2012 databases run extremely efficiently with VMware, achieving great performance in a variety of virtual machine configurations with only minor tunings to SQL Server and the vSphere ESXi host. These tunings and other best practices for fully optimizing large virtual machines for SQL Server databases are presented in the paper.

One test in the paper shows the maximum host throughput achieved with different numbers of virtual CPUs per VM. This was measured starting with 8 vCPUs per VM, then doubled to 16, then 32, and finally 64 (the maximum supported with vSphere 5.5).  DVD Store, which is a popular database tool and a key workload of the VMmark benchmark, was used to stress the VMs.  Here is a graph from the paper showing the 8 vCPU x 8 VMs case, which achieved an aggregate of 493,804 opm (operations per minute) on the host:

8 x 8 vCPU VM throughput

There are also tests using CPU affinity to show the performance differences between physical cores and logical processors (Hyper-Threads), the impact of various virtual NUMA (vNUMA) topologies, and experiments with the Latency Sensitivity advanced setting.

For more details and the test results, please download the whitepaper: Performance and Scalability of Microsoft SQL Server on VMware vSphere 5.5.

Virtual SAP HANA Achieves Production Level Performance

VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger announced production support for SAP HANA on VMware vSphere 5.5 at EMC World this week during his keynote. This is the end result of a very thorough joint testing project over the past year between VMware and SAP.

HANA is an in-memory platform (including database capabilities) from SAP that has enabled huge gains in performance for customers and has been a high priority for SAP over the past few years.  In order for HANA to be supported in a virtual machine on vSphere 5.5 for production workloads, we worked closely with SAP to enable, design, and measure in-depth performance tests.

In order to enable the testing and ongoing production support of SAP HANA on vSphere, two HANA appliance servers were ordered, shipped, and installed into SAP’s labs in Waldorf Germany.  These systems are dedicated to running SAP HANA on vSphere onsite at SAP.  Each system is an Intel Xeon E7-8870 (Westmere-EX) based four-socket server with 1TB of RAM.  They are used for performance testing and also for ongoing support of HANA on vSphere.  Additionally, VMware has onsite support engineering to assist with the testing and support.

SAP designed an extensive performance test suite that used a large number of test scenarios to stress all functions and capabilities of HANA running on vSphere 5.5.  They included OLAP and OLTP with a wide range of data sizes and query functions. In all, over one thousand individual test cases were used in this comprehensive test suite.  These same tests were run on identical native HANA systems and the difference between native and virtual tests was used as the key performance indicator.

In addition, we also tested vSphere features including vMotion, DRS, and VMware HA with virtual machines running HANA.  These tests were done with the HANA virtual machine under heavy stress.

The test results have been extremely positive and are one of the key factors in the announcement of production support.  The difference between virtual and native HANA across all the performance tests was on average within a few percentage points.

The vMotion, DRS, and VMware HA tests were all completed without issues.  Even with the large memory sizes of HANA virtual machines, we were still able to successfully migrate them with vMotion while under load with no issues.

One of the results of the extensive testing is a best practices guide for HANA on vSphere 5.5. This document includes a performance guide for running HANA on vSphere 5.5 based on this extensive testing.  The document also includes information about how to size a virtual HANA instance and how VMware HA can be used in conjunction with HANA’s own replication technology for high availability.

VDI Benchmarking Using View Planner on VMware Virtual SAN – Part 3

In part 1 and part 2 of the VDI/VSAN benchmarking blog series, we presented the VDI benchmark results on VSAN for 3-node, 5-node, 7-node, and 8-node cluster configurations. In this blog, we compare the VDI benchmarking performance of VSAN with an all flash storage array. The intent of this experiment is not to compare the maximum IOPS that you can achieve on these storage solutions; instead, we show how VSAN scales as we add more heavy VDI users. We found that VSAN can support a similar number of users as that of an all flash array even though VSAN is using host resources.

The characteristic of VDI workload is that they are CPU bound, but sensitive to I/O which makes View Planner a natural fit for this comparative study. We use VMware View Planner 3.0 for both VSAN and all flash SAN and consolidate as many heavy users as much we can on a particular cluster configuration while meeting the quality of service (QoS) criteria. Then, we find the difference in the number of users we can support before we run out of CPU, because I/O is not a bottleneck here. Since VSAN runs in the kernel and uses CPU on the host for its operation, we find that the CPU usage is quite minimal, and we see no more than a 5% consolidation difference for a heavy user run on VSAN compared to the all flash array.

As discussed in the previous blog, we used the same experimental setup where each VSAN host has two disk groups and each disk group has one PCI-e solid-state drive (SSD) of 200GB and six 300GB 15k RPM SAS disks. We built a 7-node and a 8-node cluster and ran View Planner to get the VDImark™ score for both VSAN and the all flash array. VDImark signifies the number of heavy users you can successfully run and meet the QoS criteria for a system under test. The VDImark for both VSAN and all flash array is shown in the following figure.

View Planner QoS (VDImark)

 

 From the above chart, we see that VSAN can consolidate 677 heavy users (VDImark) for 7-node and 767 heavy users for 8-node cluster. When compared to the all flash array, we don’t see more than 5% difference in the user consolidation. To further illustrate the Group-A and Group-B response times, we show the average response time of individual operations for these runs for both Group-A and Group-B, as follows.

Group-A Response Times

As seen in the figure above for both VSAN and the all flash array, the average response times of the most interactive operations are less than one second, which is needed to provide a good end-user experience.  Similar to the user consolidation, the response time of Group-A operations in VSAN is similar to what we saw with the all flash array.

Group-B Response Times

Group-B operations are sensitive to both CPU and IO and 95% should be less than six seconds to meet the QoS criteria. From the above figure, we see that the average response time for most of the operations is within the threshold and we see similar response time in VSAN when compared to the all flash array.

To see other parts on the VDI/VSAN benchmarking blog series, check the links below:
VDI Benchmarking Using View Planner on VMware Virtual SAN – Part 1
VDI Benchmarking Using View Planner on VMware Virtual SAN – Part 2
VDI Benchmarking Using View Planner on VMware Virtual SAN – Part 3