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Tag Archives: VMware

Introducing VMware NSX – The Platform For Network Virtualization

Executive Overview: Today’s data center is largely virtualized from a compute perspective, and has unleashed unprecedented benefits of agility, efficiency and capex/opex savings. What is less known is that virtual network access ports have exceeded physical network access ports in number, and this trend is accelerating. In fact, today, 40% of vAdmins manage virtual networks. Beyond virtual switching, the time is ripe to virtualize the rest of the networking stack, and accelerate our customer’s journey to the software-defined data center.

The VMware NSX platform delivers the entire networking and security model in software, decoupled from traditional networking hardware, representing a transformative leap forward in data center networking architecture.

Network Virtualization In Action: Phoenix NAP

Phoenix NAP® is a full service data center and primary network access point (NAP) offering cloud services, dedicated server hosting, colocation, and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). William Bell, vice president of product development, cloud and enterprise services at Phoenix NAP, tells us that the company has implemented VMware network virtualization as a business-critical component of their new Virtual Private Data Center (VPDC).

“Network virtualization forms the foundation of everything else we’re able to do from a service delivery perspective, and it’s a major reason why we were able to extend our services globally to increase our business opportunities.”

 

Phoenix NAP’s VPDC combines leading-edge technologies, including network virtualization from VMware, to enable customers to rapidly extend their current IT environments to the cloud without high costs or lengthy timelines. Using VMware network virtualization technology, Phoenix NAP dynamically create virtual networks with advanced security services that are completely decoupled and independent from the physical network hardware. Phoenix NAP abstracts the network from physical underlying hardware to provide an integrated point-and-click network environment that enables customers to deploy their product closer to their locations. This allows Phoenix NAP to more efficiently utilize existing data center infrastructure, while reconnecting legacy environments within virtualized networks for customers.

“Network virtualization from VMware has freed us from the constraints of physical networking. We have more flexibility in determining where, when and how we advanced cloud services to our customers, and we have the agility to expand and contract those services in near real-time in an automated and programmatic way.”

 

The use of network virtualization reduces the time it takes Phoenix NAP to help customers extend their IT infrastructure to the cloud and more easily adopt infrastructure-as-a-service to improve their business agility.

Roger Fortier, VMware, Inc.

Network Virtualization Production Deployments Continue to Rise

It was interesting to read this post on TechTarget that posed the question, “Is network virtualization real or just vaporware?” The facts are pretty clear that network virtualization is being deployed in production networks today to create business opportunities and solve infrastructure challenges for real-world customers.

For example, NTT Communications, one of the world’s largest telecommunications providers, announced it is deploying network virtualization as foundation for its new service enterprise cloud service.

WorldPay has deployed network virtualization to enable user self-provisioning and support around-the-clock development to speed the delivery of new line-of-business applications. By virtualizing the network, WorldPay gains operational simplicity to quickly create development environments in a non-disruptive way, and has on-demand access to network services such as load balancing and firewalls.

How about ViaWest, one of the largest privately-held data center, cloud computing and managed service providers in North America? Network virtualization provides ViaWest with a more efficient way of deploying cloud services than traditional hardware-defined networking approaches, leading to lower overall costs and a more consistent customer experience.

Or Logicworks, which specializes in private, public and hybrid cloud solutions for a broad array of industries, including a cloud offering focused specifically on the emerging healthcare market. Network virtualization enables Logicworks to be flexible in meeting app-specific infrastructure requirements for healthcare customers in a fraction of the time it would take to deploy applications using traditional, physical infrastructure.

To his credit, the author took all of the feedback and comments in stride. He wrote a follow up post on his own blog where he answers his own question, saying, There’s no question that network virtualization is real and is a serious force in the market.”

I’m glad the industry as a whole is starting to see potential for our VMware NSX network virtualization platform. We look forward to delivering on both the potential and the excitement which the author highlighted.

Roger Fortier, VMware, Inc.

What is a Distributed Firewall?

In the post “What is Network Virtualization?” I described a model where the application’s complete L2-L7 virtual network is decoupled from hardware and moved into a software abstraction layer for the express purpose of automation and business agility. In this post I’ll focus on network security, and describe an imminent firewall form factor enabled by Network Virtualization — the Distributed Firewall.

ALL YOUR PACKET ARE BELONG TO US

If InfoSec ruled the world … well, OK, maybe not the world … if InfoSec ruled the data center network design, and if money was no object, we would probably have something like this. Every server in the data center directly connected to its own port on one massive firewall. Every packet sent from every server would be inspected against a stateful security policy before going anywhere. And every packet received by every server would pass one final policy check before hitting the server’s NIC receive buffer. The firewall wouldn’t care about the IP address of the servers, for the simple reason that it’s directly connected to every server. E.g. “The server on this port can talk to the server on that port, on TCP port X”. And if that wasn’t good enough, the firewall knows everything about the servers connected to it, and can create rules around a rich set of semantics. All of this with no performance penalty. That would be awesome, right? Continue reading

VMware @ Red Hat Summit – More Customer Choice for OpenStack

 

Back in April at the OpenStack Summit, VMware had the opportunity to highlight its leadership in OpenStack Networking.  I presented a deep dive technical session about VMware’s network virtualization technology, and Sachin Thakkar demonstrated how VMware technology enables advanced load-balancing, VPN, and firewalling in cloud deployments within OpenStack. To top it all off, networking guru Martin Casado spoke on major technical trends in networking and how these changes in network architecture – which is happening broadly across the cloud whether in OpenStack or non-OpenStack environments – represents an opportunity for network virtualization platforms to deliver transformative value in speed, cost and most importantly, choice to customers (summed up well in this blog post).

This week VMware will be at the Red Hat Summit in Boston, where we will highlight the support of VMware network virtualization with Red Hat OpenStack. Today, Red Hat and VMware are already with one of the world’s largest telecommunications providers and one of the most well-known Web 2.0 companies to enable VMware network virtualization with Red Hat OpenStack. VMware and Red Hat are now showing further commitment to supporting such joint customers. Mike Werner, senior director, Global Ecosystems at Red Hat, stated:

 “Red Hat and VMware are collaborating to support joint customers who are transforming their data center network operations and economics through network virtualization. Red Hat will distribute and support the platform software Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenStack, including Open vSwitch, and work together with VMware to support joint customers who chose to run VMware network virtualization software on the Red Hat platforms.”

 

For our part, VMware will be participating in the official launch of the Red Hat OpenStack Cloud Infrastructure Partner Network at the event. Hatem Naguib, VMware’s vice president, Cloud Networking and Security, said in support of the announcement:

 “VMware supports heterogeneous cloud environments and engages across a rich ecosystem of vendors, such as Red Hat. Red Hat OpenStack used with VMware network virtualization can help customers transform networking to a more agile, software-based model. We’re excited to join the Red Hat OpenStack ecosystem, and to provide customers with further choice in building their cloud infrastructure.”

 

The rationale for VMware’s involvement in OpenStack is simple. OpenStack is a framework for assembling a cloud solution from the customer’s choice of underlying compute, network and storage technologies and VMware’s combination of technical leadership and innovation across such technologies is second to none. Our work with Red Hat to enable VMware network virtualization for joint customers is just one example of how VMware is working to make enable customer choice when it comes to building cloud solutions.

 Dan Wendlandt, Sr. Product Line Manager