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Tag Archives: EUC

VMware App Volumes and VMware ThinApp Combined: The Perfect Mix

By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware

Since the general availability of VMware App Volumes (formerly known as CloudVolumes), you have probably read about the many benefits that App Volumes can bring to your environment. Perhaps you have already downloaded and tested a trial version. If you use VMware ThinApp for application virtualization, you may be wondering if there are any significant benefits to combining the two products. In this blog, we will discuss the benefits of each product, and how those benefits can be magnified when you combine App Volumes and ThinApp.

App Volumes, ThinApp, or Both?

So, should you combine App Volumes and ThinApp, or not? The short answer is: It depends. There is no hard and fast rule, as individual requirements differ from environment to environment. Let us recap what each product does and the benefits offered. Continue reading

New VMware End-User Computing Channel on YouTube – Subscribe Today!

Here at VMware, we believe users should have one place to securely access all the applications, files, social tools and online services they need. This is why we’ve built one of the broadest technology platforms that bridges the entire end-user computing environment, from traditional desktops to the next generation of mobile devices.

And with VMware technology, end users get access to all of their apps and resources through one unified workspace. Pretty amazing, right? Well now our new YouTube channel aggregates all of the latest EUC video content for you, organized in playlists by the products and content you search you for the most. And better yet, you can subscribe to the channel for automatic updates.

On our new channel, discover the latest in product tutorials, customer testimonials and new product features. Get tech tips, best practices and view product demonstrations on how to implement VMware EUC technologies for your organization – including Horizon desktop and application solutions, AirWatch by VMware, Socialcast by VMware and more. You can also hear directly from our executives on milestone announcements and technology integrations, or catch a replay of a keynote you might have missed.

Below is just a snapshot of some of the resources you can expect to find on the new channel.  Subscribe to VMware EUC TV today!

 

 

 

 

 

How to Get In-Guest Metrics in vRealize Operations for Horizon 6

By Jim Yanik, End-User Computing Architect, VMware

When I was a child, I used to go camping at the Delaware Water Gap (some of you are heading for Wikipedia right now), and there were many caves that were super-tempting for an 11-year-old boy to explore. My brother and I would go into the caves and wander around, but we always stopped short into the adventure because we were missing something.

We never had a flashlight with us.

Flashlight

For a long time, I kind of felt that way about vRealize Operations for Horizon. Continue reading

Scanner Redirection in Horizon with View

By Peter Brown, Senior R&D Manager, VMware, London, UK

Over the years, I have worked with many devices that were connected remotely to a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) using USB redirection. Scanners are often problematic with USB redirection—scans take a long time to complete or do not complete at all.  Scanner redirection over USB requires a large amount of bandwidth and is sequential, so can be very slow over a latent or lossy network link (such as wifi or a WAN). Solving this problem required a similar solution as for webcam remoting (solved using RTAV).

I am delighted to announce that in our latest release we have added scanner redirection to Horizon with View for use with both VDI desktops and Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH) applications and desktops. The new scanner redirection functionality in View works by capturing the entire image at the client with the scanning device, compressing the image, and sending that compressed image to the guest in the data center, where the image is presented by a “virtual scanner device” to the application that requested the image capture. Continue reading

Retiring Old OSes: XP, Vista, Mac OS X 10.6 & 10.7

by Kristina De Nike, Product Management, VMware

Queen Maria Eleonora of Sweden kept her dead husband, King Gustav Adolf, in her bedroom for 18 months before he was finally interred. Microsoft retired XP April 8, 2014. Now, 8 months later, it’s time for VMware® Horizon® to accept that loss and plan a memorial.

We don’t do this lightly; we know that many customers are still using Microsoft XP. But with Microsoft dropping support, it is time for VMware to align with Microsoft’s decision. As Windows XP will not be support, there will be no drivers for new hardware, libraries that our products use will be incompatible and XP will not get the benefits of regular security fixes. For all these reasons, VMware is clearly outlining the support plan for Horizon to give our customers time to plan a transition.

Continue reading

Mirage 5.0 Reviewer’s Guide Now Available

By Judy Wu, End-User-Computing Solution Engineer, VMware

The Mirage 5.0 Reviewer’s Guide is available now!

Organization of the Reviewer’s Guide

This guide consists of the following major sections: Introduction, Architecture and Components, and Hands-On Evaluation Exercises for Mirage:

  • Introduction – Includes major use cases, key features in Mirage, and package and licensing information.
  • Architecture and Components – Includes descriptions of the major components and functionality, as well as architectural examples.
  • Hands-On Evaluation Exercises for Mirage – Provides detailed steps for most of the use cases and functionality of Mirage 5.0: image management, layer management, OS migration, endpoint provisioning, data recovery, disaster recovery, driver management, file portal, and more.

Experienced administrators might find the features, architecture, and best practices most useful. If you are new to Mirage, you might find the step-by-step exercises of both existing and new features most useful. Continue reading

Share Your Opinion on Desktop and Application Virtualization

Remember the days when you had to run virtual Windows 2000/XP VMs and users had to connect via RDP? Or when you used web portals to connect to physical desktops remotely with RDP? Or maybe you can recall when the first VDI brokers were brought into the market in 2007…

If you have followed these trends and these memories are near and dear to you, then you will also know that a lot has changed when it comes to desktop and application virtualization over the years. And many of these changes have come about thanks to your input and requests.

Here is your chance to influence the future of desktop and application virtualization offerings. If you have used Citrix or VMware desktop and application virtualization solutions or are thinking about using them, we’d love your input on some important research we are doing. We want to understand where your company is and where you are going on your desktop and application virtualization journey. This study will help build our understanding of your needs, interests, and influence our future offerings.

And in return for your time, if you qualify to take and complete the survey you will be entered into a drawing to win 1 of 15 iPads! Click here to view the terms and conditions.

So please take a few minutes and share your opinion. Don’t delay! Submit by January 9th at 11:59pm PST in order to qualify for the drawing.

Thanks again,
The VMware EUC Team

F5′s Username Persistence and Cloud Pod Architecture in VMware Horizon (with View) 6 – What’s the Story?

Guest Blog by Justin Venezia, Sr. Solutions Architect- VMware Alliances at F5 Networks

There’s been a lot that has changed with the release of VMware® Horizon® (with View) in June 2014. Aside from the support for RDS hosted desktops and published applications using PCoIP, there is also a new feature called Cloud Pod Architecture (CPA). CPA enables entitlements to desktops between multiple View pods within or across multiple data centers.

F5’s Local Traffic Manager (LTM), Access Policy Manager (APM), and Global Traffic Manager (GTM) solution has been able to address this challenge for some time. From a 30,000-foot view, here is how today’s integrated VMware/F5 solution works when detecting an existing session without Cloud Pod Architecture:

View-UserNamePersist

  • GTM gets you to a data center based on source IP, geo, least connections, etc.
  • You then land in one of two typical configurations:
    • LTM load-balances you between Horizon Security Servers (external connections)
    • LTM load balances you between Horizon Connection Servers (internal connections)
  • You authenticate…
  • APM can detect an existing user’s session across multiple Horizon pods, and send you to that data center to reconnect to an existing desktop
  • You are reconnected to your session!

With the introduction of Cloud Pod Architecture, how does this impact the F5 solution? What’s different? What value-add does F5 provide in this updated environment?

The beauty of the VMware/F5 relationship is that the solutions COMPLEMENT each other very well. But, a word to the wise – what you need (versus want) should be driven by an organization’s business and technical requirements in concert with the VMware/F5 solution capabilities.

Cloud Pod 101

So, let’s take a quick look at what Cloud Pod Architecture is and how it works. I’m not going to reinvent the wheel explaining this, as Narasimha Krishnakumar (Director of Product Management – EUC @ VMware) does a spot-on job of explaining it – check out this link for more info.

Basically, you can federate multiple “independent” Horizon pods and bring together pools from each Horizon Pod to appear as a “single” global pool (the official term is called Global Entitlement). If a user connects into one Horizon Pod, and their desktop resides in another, the Horizon Pod they connect to authenticates and brokers the connection on behalf of the other – and BAM! you are connected to your desktop.

This graphic – courtesy of VMware’s EUC Technical Enablement team – is the picture that’s worth a thousand words:

CPA-View6

Let’s walk through the flow of a connection to a Cloud Pod-enabled desktop pool:

  1. The user connects with a single namespace URL managed by a load balancer or directly to a Horizon Connection Server.  The user logs into Horizon using the appropriate credentials
  2. Horizon Connection Servers will search the Global AD LDS (where the CPA pool information is stored) and local Horizon Pod’s AD LDS
  3. Horizon Connection Server then checks the state of the desktop using the VIPA protocol and enumerates the desktops in the client.
  4. The user chooses the desktop.
  5. If they chose the desktop pool that is CPA enabled and their desktop is in the other Horizon Pod (in this case, the other data center), the connection is made from the client to the desktop in the remote location.

Even though the desktop is in NYC (in this example), the user connected to the London Connection Servers – these brokers authenticated the user on behalf of NYC, so the user never passes through the brokers in NYC. This same traffic flow would also apply if there were Security Servers – the connection to the NYC data center would be proxied through the Security Servers in London.

So, does this remove the need for the F5 Username Persistence solution or the need for load balancing in general?

Well, the honest answer is “it depends”. You still need to load balance between security servers and connection servers for system resiliency and scalability. Around whether CPA will adequately replace F5’s username persistence solution, you need to do some homework to determine the best approach. Here are some key points on how to determine what you’ll need to address load balancing/connection management and session persistence features when using F5’s APM and/or Horizon’s Cloud Pod Architecture (CPA):

  • You STILL need to route the initial connection to the appropriate data center (in a multiple data center model). CPA doesn’t get the connection to the data center. F5’s Global Traffic Manager (GTM) module is the method used to make this happen.
  • You STILL need to load balance connections between a Horizon Pod’s Connection Servers and Security Servers. CPA doesn’t do this either. F5 Local Traffic Manager (LTM) is the best choice for intelligent load management and monitoring of Connection/Security Server resources..
  • Cloud Pod Architecture supports RDS hosted desktops and traditional hosted desktops – HTML desktops and RDS hosted applications (App Remoting) are not currently supported.
  • Although Cloud Pod Architecture can broker access and proxy the connection to a desktop in another pod, the network connection to the final communication between the client and the desktop (or security server, if external) may not be an optimal path. The connection path may cross an internal network connection that’s constrained for bandwidth or high latency.

If we use the picture above as example, the user is accessing their desktop in the NYC Pod through the London Pod.  Therefore, the path of data flow is over the internal link – which needs to be able to handle PCoIP traffic in addition to handling other inter data center traffic when hauling PCoIP over latency-sensitive connections.

How does F5′s Username Persistence solution complement View’s Cloud Pod Architecture?

F5’s username and session persistence solution can address many of the previously mentioned challenges through the use of GTM, LTM, and/or APM. Here’s some guidance that will help you choose the right path:

  • Leverage F5’s Username/Session Persistence to address these requirements:
    • Ability to detect and reconnect to existing RDS hosted application sessions – F5’s APM can detect existing sessions and route users to that existing data center or Horizon Pod.
    • Requirement to reconnect to HTML-based desktops across multiple Horizon Pods or data centers. Username and session persistence works with HTML Desktops.
    • Provide an option to route the user’s Horizon desktop/application connection across the most optimal connection, rather than traversing an internal or constrained/latent network connection.
  • Use APM’s-integrated PCoIP Proxy feature to keep access simple and secure.
    • It’s a secure and scalable alternative in the DMZ to removing the need for Security Servers in the DMZ.
    • Works OUT OF THE BOX with Horizon’s Cloud Pod Architecture.
    • If you already have an F5 Big-IP device in the DMZ and wish to enhance its functionality and leverage your existing investment.
    • Ability to provide multiple, unique instances of PCoIP Proxy Servers for different access scenarios, all running on a single appliance.

Well, that wraps up this blog post. Our next blog post will focus on understanding and implementing F5’s PCoIP Proxy feature – we’ll cover how it works, when to use it, and how to integrate it with Horizon.

You can also send any topics or ideas to vmwarepartnership@f5.com.

Until next time…

 

Resizing the Partitions of a Physical PC for a Mirage Migration

By Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, VMware  

When you manage physical PCs that have been in the field for some time, you will likely run into some problems that impact your approach to PC management. For example, in the early days, users would often partition their hard drives for various reasons: performance, ease of maintenance, personal data, or multiple OS support. Whatever the reason, this kind of partitioning can limit your approach to a fully automated Mirage-managed migration from Windows XP to Windows 7, or from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1. The reason: a lack of disk space. Continue reading

Enhanced Windows Media Redirection in VMware Horizon with View

By Tony Huynh, Product Line Manager, End-User Computing, VMware

It has been a great year for the VMware Horizon team, and we are closing out the year strong! You may have seen the recent blog post announcing the Horizon 6.0.2 with View release and the Horizon Client 3.2 release. There were many exciting features announced in these releases, but I want to do a deeper dive on the Windows Media redirection feature, which requires these new agent and client releases.

IT administrators who need to deliver rich multimedia workloads within their virtual desktops will find that multimedia redirection (MMR) technology helps improve performance. The core idea behind MMR is to use the client endpoint to perform media processing locally instead of on the host server. Because the host server does not perform any processing on the media stream, CPU utilization is reduced. MMR also reduces the bandwidth requirements for multimedia streaming and provides a smooth playback experience. Continue reading